Author Topic: Look! A bird!  (Read 12763 times)

mamselle

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #315 on: November 05, 2020, 08:10:18 AM »
Blue birds of happiness flitting in and out of blue bird box.....

Reminds me of this book,

"Beakless Bluebirds and Featherless Penguins" by an Anglican nun in the 1990s, a bird rehibilator who wrote about her charges...
https://books.google.com/books/about/Beakless_Bluebirds_Featherless_Penguins.html?id=ZvxPAAAAYAAJ

Definitely worth reading if there are bluebirds in your life.

M.
   
Forsake the foolish, and live; and go in the way of understanding.

Reprove not a scorner, lest they hate thee: rebuke the wise, and they will love thee.

Give instruction to the wise, and they will be yet wiser: teach the just, and they will increase in learning.

nebo113

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #316 on: November 06, 2020, 04:25:40 AM »
Blue birds of happiness flitting in and out of blue bird box.....

Reminds me of this book,

"Beakless Bluebirds and Featherless Penguins" by an Anglican nun in the 1990s, a bird rehibilator who wrote about her charges...
https://books.google.com/books/about/Beakless_Bluebirds_Featherless_Penguins.html?id=ZvxPAAAAYAAJ

Definitely worth reading if there are bluebirds in your life.

M.
 

Thanks.

evil_physics_witchcraft

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #317 on: November 20, 2020, 11:09:52 AM »
We set up a temporary feeding table in the backyard near the birdbaths. One brave Brown Thrasher landed on it, while other birds flew near it. Bluebirds, Carolina wrens, Phoebes, Cardinals and Downy Woodpeckers were also hanging out.

Langue_doc

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #318 on: November 20, 2020, 03:22:04 PM »
I went birding last weekend.  I saw several red-tailed hawks, turkey vultures, sharp-shinned or Cooper's hawks, and a couple of bald eagles. A heron in flight, and another one looking for a meal by the water's edge. Several warblers and assorted waterfowl. The birds of prey were circling quite low so their markings were quite clear.

I used to go on bird watching trips post-pandemic. In addition to trips organized by the local Audubon, which fill up months in advance, state and city parks schedule trips as do a few other non-profit organizations.

mamselle

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #319 on: November 20, 2020, 03:48:19 PM »
Do you keep a life-list?

Kids at the Audubon camp I was a counselor at one summer had lists longer than your arm by age 10.

(I was impressed, but never started one.)

M.
Forsake the foolish, and live; and go in the way of understanding.

Reprove not a scorner, lest they hate thee: rebuke the wise, and they will love thee.

Give instruction to the wise, and they will be yet wiser: teach the just, and they will increase in learning.

Langue_doc

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #320 on: November 20, 2020, 04:33:21 PM »
I don't keep lists, but get one from the trip leader on the Audubon trips. The trip leaders send us lists that contain anywhere between 150-200 birds that we (the trip leader and several others; by the time I managed to get the binoculars in focus, the bird was long gone) saw during the 2-3 hour walk in a park or wildlife area in the city. There are birds I like and recognize, and others that I like to look at, but not list or record. Avid birders on these trips enter the sightings on ebird. Spring and fall migration times are peak viewing opportunities even in small parks such as Bryant Park.