Author Topic: What Do You Fix?  (Read 1259 times)

wareagle

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #30 on: August 20, 2020, 02:08:23 PM »
I am actually quite good at fixing jammed copiers.  Often the key is unplugging them, and thereby removing the fear that you might electrocute yourself if you really dig into its bowels.
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evil_physics_witchcraft

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #31 on: August 20, 2020, 02:25:41 PM »
My washer is now getting overbalanced too easily and trying to walk around the room, and has developed incontinence.  The dryer sounds like it has belts slipping.  The set is 12 years old, I can't fix them, and it's hard anymore to find anybody locally who still can.  Looks I may have to replace them soon.

Is it a front-loading or top-loading washer? It could be that the feet just aren't level (or something else). Twelve years is kind of young, IMO, for a washer/dryer set to go kaput.

It's a top-loader.  The feet are level.  I've also determined that the lines hooking it to the water supply aren't leaking.  And the leaked water that ends up on the floor is clearly "used."

Could be a bad seal or gasket.

hmaria1609

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #32 on: August 20, 2020, 06:35:01 PM »
I am actually quite good at fixing jammed copiers.  Often the key is unplugging them, and thereby removing the fear that you might electrocute yourself if you really dig into its bowels.
I've dealt lots of paper jams with older models of our Xerox machines at the library. (The ones we have now don't jam as often) I've also emptied out the ink waste tray and replaced the ink cartridge.

apl68

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #33 on: August 21, 2020, 07:11:34 AM »
I am actually quite good at fixing jammed copiers.  Often the key is unplugging them, and thereby removing the fear that you might electrocute yourself if you really dig into its bowels.
I've dealt lots of paper jams with older models of our Xerox machines at the library. (The ones we have now don't jam as often) I've also emptied out the ink waste tray and replaced the ink cartridge.

I've fixed a lot of jams over the years too.  What's tough is when the paper tears and there's a minute fragment of paper hidden deep in the machine.  The machine keeps telling you it's still jammed, and you can't find it until you've searched and searched.

The new ones are indeed a lot better about not jamming.

Toner cartridges over the years have shown quite a bit of variety.  I used to supervise a library media center with multiple copiers and multiple student workers.  Frequently I'd come to work in the morning and find that the student on duty the night before had been unable to remember the instructions for changing toner or dealing with a jam.  I wrote up cheat sheets all over the place to help them deal with equipment malfunctions.

Vkw10

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #34 on: August 21, 2020, 08:31:32 PM »
Many years ago, as and undergraduate student worker, I fixed the roll laminator in the school of education’s curriculum materials center. Loading the film correctly prevented most problems, but at least once a week someone found a new way to cause problems.
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ab_grp

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #35 on: August 22, 2020, 01:33:51 PM »
I'm not good at fixing much of anything (though I would love to be... just too nervous most of the time), but I got very good at de-jamming our main department printer years ago.  Our admin Brian had named it Lola and would get very protective of Lola if anyone became too frustrated with it.  Sadly, Lola tended to jam a lot, especially in humid weather.  I became very familiar with all the possible jam points and de-jamming procedure and even replaced a spring that had popped out from somewhere once.  I wasn't too fond of Lola at times, but our admin was a true gem, so it was worth taking the time to get to know Lola a little better and to be able to de-jam after hours so Brian didn't have to come in only to find that Lola had had the Office Space treatment.

On a side note, when I was about 10 my bff and I (same age) decided to earn some money and made flyers up, distributed throughout the neighborhood, offering to do any chore or make any repair, including fixing washing machines, ovens, or other major appliances.  I'm pretty glad no one took us up on it.  I'm not sure I was even very proficient with using my family's washing machine at the time.

Parasaurolophus

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #36 on: August 25, 2020, 10:46:18 AM »
Our dryer's been acting up, so today I heroically pulled it out (it's bolted to the washer, and there's no unbolting without out-pulling anyway), detached the exhaust pipe, and removed all the lint in the world.

Alas, 'twas not enough, for the dryer still refuses to heat up.
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fishbrains

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #37 on: August 25, 2020, 11:06:55 AM »
Our dryer's been acting up, so today I heroically pulled it out (it's bolted to the washer, and there's no unbolting without out-pulling anyway), detached the exhaust pipe, and removed all the lint in the world.

Alas, 'twas not enough, for the dryer still refuses to heat up.

If the dryer coils got too hot because of the all lint blocking the exhaust hose, it has probably popped the fuses in the dryer (this is actually a very good thing that probably prevented a fire). These fuses (my dryer has three) are pretty easy to replace with a socket set, needle-nose plyers, and a Phillips screwdriver by ordering about $20 worth of parts and watching a YouTube video. I've done this a few times on our 20+-year-old dryer, my sister-in-law's dryer, and my neighbor's dryer. A lot cheaper than a new dryer.

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Parasaurolophus

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #38 on: August 25, 2020, 11:59:07 AM »
Our dryer's been acting up, so today I heroically pulled it out (it's bolted to the washer, and there's no unbolting without out-pulling anyway), detached the exhaust pipe, and removed all the lint in the world.

Alas, 'twas not enough, for the dryer still refuses to heat up.

If the dryer coils got too hot because of the all lint blocking the exhaust hose, it has probably popped the fuses in the dryer (this is actually a very good thing that probably prevented a fire). These fuses (my dryer has three) are pretty easy to replace with a socket set, needle-nose plyers, and a Phillips screwdriver by ordering about $20 worth of parts and watching a YouTube video. I've done this a few times on our 20+-year-old dryer, my sister-in-law's dryer, and my neighbor's dryer. A lot cheaper than a new dryer.

That's reassuring! I was thinking it was the fuse, but also didn't expect it could easily be replaced.

Happily, it's the landlord's job to fix it, not mine, but he'll be pleased at the prospect of just buying a fuse.
I know it's a genus.

evil_physics_witchcraft

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #39 on: August 25, 2020, 01:22:37 PM »
Our dryer's been acting up, so today I heroically pulled it out (it's bolted to the washer, and there's no unbolting without out-pulling anyway), detached the exhaust pipe, and removed all the lint in the world.

Alas, 'twas not enough, for the dryer still refuses to heat up.

If the dryer coils got too hot because of the all lint blocking the exhaust hose, it has probably popped the fuses in the dryer (this is actually a very good thing that probably prevented a fire). These fuses (my dryer has three) are pretty easy to replace with a socket set, needle-nose plyers, and a Phillips screwdriver by ordering about $20 worth of parts and watching a YouTube video. I've done this a few times on our 20+-year-old dryer, my sister-in-law's dryer, and my neighbor's dryer. A lot cheaper than a new dryer.

That's reassuring! I was thinking it was the fuse, but also didn't expect it could easily be replaced.

Happily, it's the landlord's job to fix it, not mine, but he'll be pleased at the prospect of just buying a fuse.

We have a 20 year old dryer and had two thermal fuses go out. Easy fix.

ergative

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #40 on: November 20, 2020, 03:56:45 AM »
The thingummy that holds the toilet paper roll to the wall has gotten rather wobbly over the last few months. I've taken a screwdriver to the visible screws, but that hasn't helped.

In more successful home improvements, I've successfully ordered curtains from Ikea, along with curtain hooks that are compatible with my existing support mechanism, and installed them with a minimum of faff. They fit the window, darken the room appropriately, and slide freely. They also are not encrusted with mold, which is rather nice. Unfortunately, the wall by the windows does tend to sprout little colonies in wet weather, so I don't know how long that state of affairs will last.

Puget

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #41 on: November 20, 2020, 06:27:41 AM »
Unfortunately, the wall by the windows does tend to sprout little colonies in wet weather, so I don't know how long that state of affairs will last.

You really don't want to be living with mold! Depending on the kind, it can be very unhealthy to breathe, even if you aren't allergic.

Is water getting in around the frame, or condensing on the inside of the glass? If the former, you might want to try using silicone caulk around the outer part of the frame and foam tape to get a tighter seal between window and frame. In either case, a dehumidifier may help.

There is also anti-mold paint meant for moist environments like bathrooms you could repaint the wall with (I used a Rost-Oleum one called Perma-White in my bathroom-- it can be tinted if you don't want white).

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ergative

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #42 on: November 20, 2020, 07:26:42 AM »
Unfortunately, the wall by the windows does tend to sprout little colonies in wet weather, so I don't know how long that state of affairs will last.

You really don't want to be living with mold! Depending on the kind, it can be very unhealthy to breathe, even if you aren't allergic.

Is water getting in around the frame, or condensing on the inside of the glass? If the former, you might want to try using silicone caulk around the outer part of the frame and foam tape to get a tighter seal between window and frame. In either case, a dehumidifier may help.

There is also anti-mold paint meant for moist environments like bathrooms you could repaint the wall with (I used a Rost-Oleum one called Perma-White in my bathroom-- it can be tinted if you don't want white).

These are very useful tips for when I own my own place and can make decisions like repainting rooms! As it is, I had to ask my letting agency to ask my landlord for permission just to change the curtains, and since she recently had to pay for some extremely expensive repairs (new washing machine, then boiler + heating system, in the span of a couple of months) I don't want to make too many demands. This is the kind of mildew that goes away easily enough with a quick bleachy wipedown, so I'm not too fussed about it.

I've noticed myself asking various workmen who make repairs how much each type of job would cost if I were in charge of paying for it. It's all very nice to fantasize about owning my own place and hiring people to install built-in bookshelves and build secret rooms behind wardrobe doors, but I'm well aware that I should probably be budgeting more for projects like fixing the roof and replacing the refrigerator. Oh, well.

Tee_Bee

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #43 on: November 21, 2020, 10:00:16 PM »
My wife sat on a Chromebook and broke the screen. I fixed it by buying a screen online and following instructions in a Youtube video. I am a bit too proud of this, I fear. But keeping an otherwise working computer out of a landfill was remarkably satisfying.

Puget

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Re: What Do You Fix?
« Reply #44 on: November 22, 2020, 06:45:09 AM »
Unfortunately, the wall by the windows does tend to sprout little colonies in wet weather, so I don't know how long that state of affairs will last.

You really don't want to be living with mold! Depending on the kind, it can be very unhealthy to breathe, even if you aren't allergic.

Is water getting in around the frame, or condensing on the inside of the glass? If the former, you might want to try using silicone caulk around the outer part of the frame and foam tape to get a tighter seal between window and frame. In either case, a dehumidifier may help.

There is also anti-mold paint meant for moist environments like bathrooms you could repaint the wall with (I used a Rost-Oleum one called Perma-White in my bathroom-- it can be tinted if you don't want white).

These are very useful tips for when I own my own place and can make decisions like repainting rooms! As it is, I had to ask my letting agency to ask my landlord for permission just to change the curtains, and since she recently had to pay for some extremely expensive repairs (new washing machine, then boiler + heating system, in the span of a couple of months) I don't want to make too many demands. This is the kind of mildew that goes away easily enough with a quick bleachy wipedown, so I'm not too fussed about it.

I've noticed myself asking various workmen who make repairs how much each type of job would cost if I were in charge of paying for it. It's all very nice to fantasize about owning my own place and hiring people to install built-in bookshelves and build secret rooms behind wardrobe doors, but I'm well aware that I should probably be budgeting more for projects like fixing the roof and replacing the refrigerator. Oh, well.

I don't think it's asking too much to demand your rental be free of mold. Remember, the part you can see is the tip of the iceberg vs. what's potentially IN the walls. I would look into your local tenant's rights laws.

In the meantime, a portable dehumidifier is something under your control.

Here, it's time to set up the humidifiers, as the heating is drying out the air and making my sinuses sad.
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