Author Topic: The TV Series Thread  (Read 2560 times)

evil_physics_witchcraft

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Re: The TV Series Thread
« Reply #90 on: January 12, 2021, 12:41:26 PM »
I started watching Grimm on Prime. Predictable, but the universe is interesting. It seems like a new animorph-type character is introduced each episode.

hmaria1609

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Re: The TV Series Thread
« Reply #91 on: January 12, 2021, 07:11:55 PM »
We have recorded All Creatures Great and Small but haven't had a chance to watch it yet.  I'm dying to see it.  I've seen the trailers, and of all the characters, I think that the new, younger Mrs. Hall will be hard to get used to.  The actor who plays Tristan was in The Durells in Corfu. It's a similar kind of roleā€”the slightly less responsible/unsettled younger brother.
Anna Madeley, who plays Mrs. Hall, has been in other shows and movies. These are the three I best remember seeing her: Miss Ravillious, the accessories dept. head on "Mr. Selfridge" 1st season, Lucy Steele in Sense & Sensibility (2008), and Isabella Beeton in "The Secret Life of Mrs. Beeton" (2006).

Callum Woodhouse played Leslie Durrell on the "Durrells in Corfu." It's his 2nd round with animals as part of the show.

Economizer

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Re: The TV Series Thread
« Reply #92 on: January 16, 2021, 09:40:11 AM »
I don't know if it, a wildlife show, can be termed a series but I found "Hope in the Wild" to be very entertaining. The main subjects were animal recuperation although the program is quite informative and features a gentle and mild humor.

Today the opening spoke of groundhogs, saying that they, those, were commonly called woodchucks. I did not know that! I do think that beavers more readily deserve that distinction though. But, who am I to say. The very mention of the word woodchuck, however, causes me to ask, myself, "How many?".

This episode also featured successful and ongoing treatment of a variety of avian and marine creatures. Their handling was quite a chore and exciting to watch! Oh, and quite a few young chicks were in the action, and I ain't talkin' birds. The principle, Hope, is more my speed though, but then I digress.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2021, 09:55:16 AM by Economizer »
So, I tried to straighten everything out and guess what I got for it.  No, really, just guess!

ergative

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Re: The TV Series Thread
« Reply #93 on: January 17, 2021, 11:32:01 AM »
Absolutive and I just started the BBC miniseries of 'Cranford'. I'd been putting it off because I'd read that it also included some other Gaskell novellas and I wanted to read them first, but we had ice cream and wanted to watch something, so we dove in. I must say, the seams where My Lady Ludlow was tacked onto Cranford show badly. The plots intersect at one point when the Cranford people get some ice from My Lady Ludlow's ice house, but otherwise it's two entirely distinct stories alternating scenes with each other.

hmaria1609

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Re: The TV Series Thread
« Reply #94 on: January 17, 2021, 07:34:27 PM »
Absolutive and I just started the BBC miniseries of 'Cranford'. I'd been putting it off because I'd read that it also included some other Gaskell novellas and I wanted to read them first, but we had ice cream and wanted to watch something, so we dove in. I must say, the seams where My Lady Ludlow was tacked onto Cranford show badly. The plots intersect at one point when the Cranford people get some ice from My Lady Ludlow's ice house, but otherwise it's two entirely distinct stories alternating scenes with each other.
I remember watching that show and "Return to Cranford" when they broadcasted on "Masterpiece."  Fun TV trivia fact: the show was shot in historic Lacock, UK. The village has been used for numerous period TV shows and movies.