Author Topic: Vaccination nation  (Read 4949 times)

apl68

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #135 on: February 20, 2021, 08:33:45 AM »
I find it ironic that if I was obese and a cigarette smoker, I'd now be eligible for vaccination in some states. But since I make an effort to keep myself as healthy as possible given that I have a chronic immunological disorder, I'm not eligible.

Wouldn't a chronic immunological disorder be considered a risk factor that put a person in a higher vaccination classification?
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clean

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #136 on: February 20, 2021, 09:35:58 AM »
Check with your physician.  Mine wrote a prescription to use.

Phase 1B: People 65+ or people 16+ with a health condition that increases risk of severe COVID‑19 illness, including but not limited to:

Cancer
Chronic kidney disease
COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
Down Syndrome
Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
Organ transplantation
Obesity
Pregnancy
Sickle cell disease
Type 2 diabetes
If you have a medical condition not listed above, you may still qualify for the vaccine. Talk to your provider to confirm.
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spork

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #137 on: February 20, 2021, 10:42:42 AM »
I find it ironic that if I was obese and a cigarette smoker, I'd now be eligible for vaccination in some states. But since I make an effort to keep myself as healthy as possible given that I have a chronic immunological disorder, I'm not eligible.

Wouldn't a chronic immunological disorder be considered a risk factor that put a person in a higher vaccination classification?

Depends on the disorder. Mine isn't on the list.
It's terrible writing, used to obfuscate the fact that the authors actually have nothing to say.

Langue_doc

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #138 on: February 20, 2021, 11:57:47 AM »
I find it ironic that if I was obese and a cigarette smoker, I'd now be eligible for vaccination in some states. But since I make an effort to keep myself as healthy as possible given that I have a chronic immunological disorder, I'm not eligible.

Wouldn't a chronic immunological disorder be considered a risk factor that put a person in a higher vaccination classification?

Depends on the disorder. Mine isn't on the list.

Depends on your state. Cigarette smokers get priority in NJ, but not in NY. Each state seems to be making its own arbitrary set of guidelines.

spork

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #139 on: February 20, 2021, 12:28:53 PM »
I find it ironic that if I was obese and a cigarette smoker, I'd now be eligible for vaccination in some states. But since I make an effort to keep myself as healthy as possible given that I have a chronic immunological disorder, I'm not eligible.

Wouldn't a chronic immunological disorder be considered a risk factor that put a person in a higher vaccination classification?

Depends on the disorder. Mine isn't on the list.

Depends on your state. Cigarette smokers get priority in NJ, but not in NY. Each state seems to be making its own arbitrary set of guidelines.

Yes. Arbitrary is the correct word.
It's terrible writing, used to obfuscate the fact that the authors actually have nothing to say.

kaysixteen

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #140 on: February 21, 2021, 06:11:38 PM »
I suppose one might argue that a smoker, who chooses his bad health habits, ought not to be rewarded for that by going to the head of the vax queue.   I am not sure of the morality of such an argument, but, like it or not, at the present time, we do not have enough vax available for all who would want it, so some decisions as to prioritization must be made.   It is a black swan event.

dismalist

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #141 on: February 21, 2021, 06:35:18 PM »
Quote
Arbitrary is the correct word.

Yes and no.

Whats the proper objective function?

-save the maximum number of lives;
-save the maximum number of remaining years of life;
-save my life;
-save the maximum number of voters' lives. :-)

Politicians decide for us, as they have to, for that is what they were elected for. But we can stand back and evaluate.
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hesitant

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #142 on: February 22, 2021, 08:27:33 PM »
All of this brings me to my own dilemma: should I get vaccinated? I qualify in my state because I am obese (BMI: 33.4) and a former smoker, both of which are listed as co-morbidities by the CDC that  put me at higher risk for COVID complications. And yes, I do realize these are both result of life style choices. I wouldn't just get a vaccine  because I can, but here is why I am even contemplating it.

 I am  an immigrant (no family in the US), 48 year old,  with a 7 year old daughter, who attends school in person twice a week. My husband, who is 56, is also a  former smoker (a very heavy one at that; 2 packs a day for 30 years...). Had it been just us, with no child in school, I would not even contemplate a vaccination at this point: we work from home and can socially distance. My neighbors who work in supermarkets, hospitals and schools need the shot more than I do. However, just the thought of my daughter bringing COVID to one or both of us and one of us -- or, the unthinkable, both of us --  dying, horrifies me. (Keeping her home is not an option for her; she developed some serious mental health issues in the spring, as 6 year old who lived in isolation for 6 months before her school partially reopened last fall).

I know  that I am not the only one in this position, but what would you do if you were me -- obese former middle aged smoker with a young child? If your state allowed it, would you get the vaccine now or wait for it to be available to everyone first? I really do not know (and my intense anxiety around health/death and leaving a young child behind is not helping me make the right decision...)

ergative

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #143 on: February 23, 2021, 02:58:40 AM »
hesitant, if you're eligible get the vaccine! Your thoughts for grocery store workers are admirable, but you have a higher responsibility not to leave your child an orphan.

If it assuages your guilt, you can offer to go on grocery runs or other errands for your neighbors to minimize their risk going out unvaccinated--indeed, that would not only protect your neighbors, but also protect the people that they might come in contact with if they go grocery shopping while not realizing they're contagious.

The worse-case scenario is not you getting the vaccine instead of a more 'deserving' neighbor. It is you not getting a vaccine and that dose then expiring because your state doesn't consider your neighbors eligible yet. This stranger on the internet gives you the A+ thumbs up to get vaccinated.

spork

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #144 on: February 23, 2021, 04:03:38 AM »
All of this brings me to my own dilemma: should I get vaccinated? I qualify in my state because I am obese (BMI: 33.4) and a former smoker, both of which are listed as co-morbidities by the CDC that  put me at higher risk for COVID complications. And yes, I do realize these are both result of life style choices. I wouldn't just get a vaccine  because I can, but here is why I am even contemplating it.

 I am  an immigrant (no family in the US), 48 year old,  with a 7 year old daughter, who attends school in person twice a week. My husband, who is 56, is also a  former smoker (a very heavy one at that; 2 packs a day for 30 years...). Had it been just us, with no child in school, I would not even contemplate a vaccination at this point: we work from home and can socially distance. My neighbors who work in supermarkets, hospitals and schools need the shot more than I do. However, just the thought of my daughter bringing COVID to one or both of us and one of us -- or, the unthinkable, both of us --  dying, horrifies me. (Keeping her home is not an option for her; she developed some serious mental health issues in the spring, as 6 year old who lived in isolation for 6 months before her school partially reopened last fall).

I know  that I am not the only one in this position, but what would you do if you were me -- obese former middle aged smoker with a young child? If your state allowed it, would you get the vaccine now or wait for it to be available to everyone first? I really do not know (and my intense anxiety around health/death and leaving a young child behind is not helping me make the right decision...)

Get vaccinated. You fall into multiple co-morbidity risk categories. Minimize the chance that your child becomes an orphan.
It's terrible writing, used to obfuscate the fact that the authors actually have nothing to say.

Charlotte

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #145 on: February 23, 2021, 04:48:17 AM »
All of this brings me to my own dilemma: should I get vaccinated? I qualify in my state because I am obese (BMI: 33.4) and a former smoker, both of which are listed as co-morbidities by the CDC that  put me at higher risk for COVID complications. And yes, I do realize these are both result of life style choices. I wouldn't just get a vaccine  because I can, but here is why I am even contemplating it.

 I am  an immigrant (no family in the US), 48 year old,  with a 7 year old daughter, who attends school in person twice a week. My husband, who is 56, is also a  former smoker (a very heavy one at that; 2 packs a day for 30 years...). Had it been just us, with no child in school, I would not even contemplate a vaccination at this point: we work from home and can socially distance. My neighbors who work in supermarkets, hospitals and schools need the shot more than I do. However, just the thought of my daughter bringing COVID to one or both of us and one of us -- or, the unthinkable, both of us --  dying, horrifies me. (Keeping her home is not an option for her; she developed some serious mental health issues in the spring, as 6 year old who lived in isolation for 6 months before her school partially reopened last fall).

I know  that I am not the only one in this position, but what would you do if you were me -- obese former middle aged smoker with a young child? If your state allowed it, would you get the vaccine now or wait for it to be available to everyone first? I really do not know (and my intense anxiety around health/death and leaving a young child behind is not helping me make the right decision...)

I think it’s wonderful that you are being so thoughtful and selfless, but your daughter needs you and the people making the decisions on who gets the vaccine think that you need it too. My vote is to get the vaccine and don’t feel guilty. You are doing it for your daughter and that’s what a good mother does.

secundem_artem

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #146 on: February 23, 2021, 06:46:33 AM »
If you qualify for a vaccine, you qualify.  Full stop.  You are not "taking" an opportunity from somebody who "needs it more". 

In other news, Mrs. Artem got her first shot yesterday.  Former smoker, mild to moderate COPD and meets the age requirement.  No lines got jumped.
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Sun_Worshiper

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #147 on: February 23, 2021, 07:12:41 AM »
Agree with the above. The more people who get vaccinated the better, so you are helping the wider cause by getting yourself vaccinated, and protecting yourself and your family.

hesitant

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #148 on: February 23, 2021, 09:07:13 AM »
Hi All,
Thank you all for your thoughtful responses, and the encouragement, of course... My husband and I were going back and forth on this and we were overthinking it in all kinds of ways: I only smoked for 9 years and only half a pack a day, so may be that it does not put me at such a higher risk...I even found studies that quantified the risk in pack  years (packs a day multiplied by the number of years, etc...) It just  felt that I wanted to game the system ( doesn't apply to my husband who  does not qualify yet; he will when people with one health issue come up...) and yet my anxious brain was telling me that, yes, if the state thinks I should get the vaccine , then I should...thank you again for confirming that! And now let the hunting for an appointment begin (mission impossible in my state!)

mythbuster

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Re: Vaccination nation
« Reply #149 on: February 23, 2021, 12:16:30 PM »
In Florida, no plan as to who gets the vaccine next after the seniors. DeSantis must think that only the over 65 set ever votes.
https://www.tampabay.com/news/health/2021/02/23/who-gets-vaccinated-next-floridas-the-only-state-that-doesnt-tell-you/