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Look! A bird!

Started by professor_pat, May 31, 2019, 11:08:06 AM

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apl68

Quote from: Langue_doc on June 26, 2024, 12:36:47 PMOn the way to the PT appointment--long drive, three lanes most of the way--I saw what looked like three large vultures. On the way back, sitting in bumper to bumper traffic, a great egret flew majestically over the roadway, neck stretched out in front, and feet stretched back. Made my day! Later, an osprey soared above, flying rather low. There were other birds, but it's never a good idea to try to identify birds when driving.

When large egrets or other herons beat their wings to take off, it's almost like watching a slow levitation.  Fascinating to see such a large bird rise into the air.
For our light affliction, which is only for a moment, works for us a far greater and eternal weight of glory.  We look not at the things we can see, but at those we can't.  For the things we can see are temporary, but those we can't see are eternal.

Langue_doc

The goose family is down to four goslings. They're all grown up now, and have the same coloring and feathers as the parents.

I saw the egret alongside a pond. He flew off to the other pond when he saw me. Soon, another egret circled the trees alongside the pond and was about to settle down, but Egret-already-in-possession-of-territory decided to show the interloper who was in charge wouldn't let him alight, but instead tried to chase him off. They flew around for a short time, and then one of them flew away. The other one flew to the first pond and walked around trying to spear fish. The water was relatively low, so it was hit or miss for the egret--he got a couple, but there were instances when he couldn't bend down that low, or just couldn't reach the fish. Unlike herons, egrets are rather skittish, so you have to keep your distance.

FishProf

At a coffee shop this morning, Smolt was feeding croissant to the local beggar-birds.  A myna would get the food, then fledgling house sparrows would come to it begging (wings flapping, moths open, pathetic cheeping) and the myna would look at them like "go away, this is mine", then would feed the babies.  It was a great example of the convergence of begging behavior.  This is what allows brood parasites (cuckoos and cowbirds, for example) to exploit parents of other species.
I'd rather have questions I can't answer, than answers I can't question.

AmLitHist

A new brood of 4 hungry baby robins has hatched by our window AC! Mom and Dad Robin are actively fussing and dive-bombing anyone who even looks toward that end of the house.

Langue_doc

The goose family was quite happily swimming in the pond. Goslings are the spitting image of their parents, albeit slightly smaller. The egret was looking for morsels--didn't seem to be hungry as he took his time deciding whether to spear a tidbit with his beak or just saunter on.

I often have interesting conversations with people I encounter here. This morning, it was a man with an East European accent who pointed to the egret, and then asked me what it was called. After asking me to repeat the name twice, he told me that this was his second bird (name) as earlier someone else had told him the name of the red-winged blackbird. When I showed him the Merlin app on my phone and how to install it on his phone, he looked quite happy. Later I encountered someone I know who asked me what birds I'd seen this morning.

Yesterday, on my way home, just past the exit ramp, there was an egret flying overhead.

ciao_yall

Quote from: Langue_doc on July 04, 2024, 11:24:21 AMThe goose family was quite happily swimming in the pond. Goslings are the spitting image of their parents, albeit slightly smaller. The egret was looking for morsels--didn't seem to be hungry as he took his time deciding whether to spear a tidbit with his beak or just saunter on.

I often have interesting conversations with people I encounter here. This morning, it was a man with an East European accent who pointed to the egret, and then asked me what it was called. After asking me to repeat the name twice, he told me that this was his second bird (name) as earlier someone else had told him the name of the red-winged blackbird. When I showed him the Merlin app on my phone and how to install it on his phone, he looked quite happy. Later I encountered someone I know who asked me what birds I'd seen this morning.

Yesterday, on my way home, just past the exit ramp, there was an egret flying overhead.

You need to submit this to the Metro Diary or whatever it's called in the NY Times!

Langue_doc

Quote from: ciao_yall on July 04, 2024, 12:21:29 PMYou need to submit this to the Metro Diary or whatever it's called in the NY Times!


I go to this place for peace and quiet, so posting my experiences and encounters anywhere (other than the anonymous Fora) would defeat the purpose.

ciao_yall

Quote from: Langue_doc on July 04, 2024, 01:38:49 PM
Quote from: ciao_yall on July 04, 2024, 12:21:29 PMYou need to submit this to the Metro Diary or whatever it's called in the NY Times!


I go to this place for peace and quiet, so posting my experiences and encounters anywhere (other than the anonymous Fora) would defeat the purpose.

This morning's Metropolitan Diary had a birdwatching story. Thought of you, Langue_doc.

FishProf

The myna birds here on the Big Island (Hawai'i) sing the twitter notification tone.  How much do they have to hear that for all of them to sing it?
I'd rather have questions I can't answer, than answers I can't question.

Langue_doc

Quote from: ciao_yall on July 07, 2024, 09:07:09 AM
Quote from: Langue_doc on July 04, 2024, 01:38:49 PM
Quote from: ciao_yall on July 04, 2024, 12:21:29 PMYou need to submit this to the Metro Diary or whatever it's called in the NY Times!


I go to this place for peace and quiet, so posting my experiences and encounters anywhere (other than the anonymous Fora) would defeat the purpose.

This morning's Metropolitan Diary had a birdwatching story. Thought of you, Langue_doc.

Thanks, ciao_yall!

Puget

Saw a pair of great horned owls when I was out walking around dusk. There was a very plentiful bunny population in the area, so I doubt they had to go far for dinner.
"Never get separated from your lunch. Never get separated from your friends. Never climb up anything you can't climb down."
–Best Colorado Peak Hikes