The Fora: A Higher Education Community

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Thursday's_Child on August 29, 2019, 07:37:58 AM

Title: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on August 29, 2019, 07:37:58 AM
We have threads for gardens, dogs, cats, and birds.  Perhaps we can use this one for wildlife sightings (& all the other interesting stuff) - not that I really mind having bats & coyotes on the bird thread, and rabbits & skunks on the things to tell people thread, of course!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 29, 2019, 09:21:49 AM
Glad you started this, that was me and the skunk on the "Tell Folks" thread...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on August 29, 2019, 09:56:16 AM
I've only seen them a few times, but was pretty sure you were describing a skunk!

My recent critters include an about half-grown rabbit - a very silly one who is extremely fortunate that the patio door was closed when it hopped across the patio early the other morning.  Two predators closely observed its progress, gnashing their teeth in frustration all the while!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on August 29, 2019, 02:25:56 PM
We have had a few interesting (to me, not originally being from this area) sightings.  We had a strangely behaving little black and white furry creature set up shop on the patio last summer.  It did not seem to have any problems with the human folk being around, but we had some problems with his/her presence, naturally.  It led to some fun times trying to get rid of the critter.  Another appeared this summer but didn't make much of an impression.

I have also encountered three tarantulas this summer.  No, just no.  I am aware that they are not as "bad" as black widows (which we also have at the house!), but I can't see the black widows.  These three just appeared at various times on the patio.  They were gigantic.  No.

Husband had a brief encounter with a coyote last night while taking the garbage out.  He seemed irrationally calm when recounting the tale. 

We also had a pack of wild boars hanging around the neighborhood a couple months back.  They were large and apparently believed themselves to be in charge, but I guess they wandered off at some point to raise hell elsewhere.

The neighbors seem to have a goat.  At least that is something I am not afraid of.  We also have bunnies in the yard, doves who have made a nest on the patio (which led to a frightening scene with an owl last year), stray cats.  I love the cats.  When the boars made their appearance and were discussed on the neighborhood watch group, a neighbor apparently thought it was time to bring up their anger about the stray cats (several times!).  I like it when the cats visit.  Not so much the boars.  There have also been some rattlesnakes around, but I have not (knock on wood, never will) run into one yet.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on August 29, 2019, 05:32:42 PM
I’ve already posted on the bird board about my current stint farm sitting next to a nature preserve. Fauna-wise, I’ve been seeing a lot of deer, and while I haven’t yet seen them, I’ve certainly been hearing a LOT of coyotes.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 29, 2019, 05:43:09 PM
Re: boar: not here, but south of Paris, once, I was invited to stay with a British ex-pat who lived near Fontainebleau.

Actually, in a village near the King's Woods...which we had to drive through when she decided to go to a party some friends were giving, and asked me to go along. I was tired, didn't really want to go, but she insisted. She didn't really mind driving alone, but she needed me to do something for her.

Puzzled, I agreed.

I had no sooner gotten in the car than she said, "Alright, here's what you need to do. There are no lights along this road. There are wild boar in the woods. If they run into the car, they'll wreck it, AND I'll be fined.

So I sat shotgun, looking out for boar, as we rocketed through the Bois du Roi and back.

The party was OK, but I was very glad we had no close encounters with wild boar that night....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on August 29, 2019, 07:02:27 PM
Of late, I've seen deer in people's yards or crossing the road at various hours.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on August 29, 2019, 07:03:07 PM
Recently: lots of white-tailed deer, a couple sea otters, a few sea lions (California, I think), tons of harbor seals, orcas, bald eagles, turkey vultures, a mouse, a squirrel, and a small army of dead shrews and more-or-less intact lizards (European wall lizards and alligator lizards, I thinK). On the mainland, one cow moose and three black bears.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on August 30, 2019, 03:58:54 AM
Sadly, the doe and her fawn who've been visiting has been reduced to just the fawn.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on August 30, 2019, 05:01:00 AM
We have had a few interesting (to me, not originally being from this area) sightings.  We had a strangely behaving little black and white furry creature set up shop on the patio last summer.  It did not seem to have any problems with the human folk being around, but we had some problems with his/her presence, naturally.  It led to some fun times trying to get rid of the critter.  Another appeared this summer but didn't make much of an impression.

I have also encountered three tarantulas this summer.  No, just no.  I am aware that they are not as "bad" as black widows (which we also have at the house!), but I can't see the black widows.  These three just appeared at various times on the patio.  They were gigantic.  No.

Husband had a brief encounter with a coyote last night while taking the garbage out.  He seemed irrationally calm when recounting the tale. 

We also had a pack of wild boars hanging around the neighborhood a couple months back.  They were large and apparently believed themselves to be in charge, but I guess they wandered off at some point to raise hell elsewhere.

The neighbors seem to have a goat.  At least that is something I am not afraid of.  We also have bunnies in the yard, doves who have made a nest on the patio (which led to a frightening scene with an owl last year), stray cats.  I love the cats.  When the boars made their appearance and were discussed on the neighborhood watch group, a neighbor apparently thought it was time to bring up their anger about the stray cats (several times!).  I like it when the cats visit.  Not so much the boars.  There have also been some rattlesnakes around, but I have not (knock on wood, never will) run into one yet.

I'm going to push back, politely and diplomatically I hope, on stray felines.  Feral felines face a desperate life.  Moreover, they can breed incestuously which can produce deformed offspring, which lead extremely desperate and short lives.  Finally, ferals and strays can harbor diseases.  And, they kill birds.  Please do reconsider your affection for stray felines, especially ferals.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on August 30, 2019, 05:12:34 AM
We have had deer as well on a fairly regular basis in our suburb, which is hardly rural.  They seem to be growing less concerned about being around human habitats.  We saw a gray fox once last year; it looked far less comfortable than the deer.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: polly_mer on August 30, 2019, 05:31:42 AM
We have bears and deer.  The bears are enough of a problem that the town is discussing requiring bear-proof containers for all residents.  The large businesses in town have already implemented bear-proof containers and have put up cameras so we can all enjoy the wildlife.

The schools haven't been in session long enough to have an animal-related lockdown yet, but last year, the schools had several animal-related lockdowns for mountain lions in addition to bears.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hesitant on August 30, 2019, 06:23:37 AM
Having grown up in apartments in the city, spouse and I were ecstatic to move to our 1,200 sq ft house on an acre wooded lot. Oh, the giant old oaks and pines, the fall colors (maple), the deer, the chipmunks, the birds!

Six years in, we have learned that nature does not conveniently stay in the backyard but constantly tries to move in with you (carpenter ants, wasps, even lady bug infestations have happened more than once!)

One time, I found a pound of dirt on the inside of the attached garage as my husband was complaining that his hiking boots (also in the garage) were filled with bird seed. Turns out, our friendly chipmunk has dug a tunnel under the driveway and set house in the lower level, using the hiking boots as barns.

We have had a garter snake curl up on the rug under the desk in the  home office on the lower level (spouse had forgotten to close the garage door).

Deer and wild turkey  reign over our yard, and once I saw a (what looked to me like a) giant groundhog standing on the front lawn.

It was only last year that I saw my first fox, but it was gorgeous! Also, red tailed hawks like spying on potential pray from the big trees in my yard and landing upon the unsuspecting victim as it crosses the back lawn (which is really a clearing in the forest).

Overall, they are all quite enjoyable and I have made peace with the regular sessions of deer excrement collection I have to perform on the yard (5 year old kiddo loves running barefoot on the grass).  My warm feelings do not apply to  the ticks (I live in the NE, so no fun), which cost me 300 dollars a year in spraying and the wasps, who seem to love building 2 ft long nests under the steps of our deck (and who also cost me 200 bucks every two years or so in pest control).
 

 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on August 30, 2019, 10:07:56 AM
We have had a few interesting (to me, not originally being from this area) sightings.  We had a strangely behaving little black and white furry creature set up shop on the patio last summer.  It did not seem to have any problems with the human folk being around, but we had some problems with his/her presence, naturally.  It led to some fun times trying to get rid of the critter.  Another appeared this summer but didn't make much of an impression.

I have also encountered three tarantulas this summer.  No, just no.  I am aware that they are not as "bad" as black widows (which we also have at the house!), but I can't see the black widows.  These three just appeared at various times on the patio.  They were gigantic.  No.

Husband had a brief encounter with a coyote last night while taking the garbage out.  He seemed irrationally calm when recounting the tale. 

We also had a pack of wild boars hanging around the neighborhood a couple months back.  They were large and apparently believed themselves to be in charge, but I guess they wandered off at some point to raise hell elsewhere.

The neighbors seem to have a goat.  At least that is something I am not afraid of.  We also have bunnies in the yard, doves who have made a nest on the patio (which led to a frightening scene with an owl last year), stray cats.  I love the cats.  When the boars made their appearance and were discussed on the neighborhood watch group, a neighbor apparently thought it was time to bring up their anger about the stray cats (several times!).  I like it when the cats visit.  Not so much the boars.  There have also been some rattlesnakes around, but I have not (knock on wood, never will) run into one yet.

I'm going to push back, politely and diplomatically I hope, on stray felines.  Feral felines face a desperate life.  Moreover, they can breed incestuously which can produce deformed offspring, which lead extremely desperate and short lives.  Finally, ferals and strays can harbor diseases.  And, they kill birds.  Please do reconsider your affection for stray felines, especially ferals.

I do agree.  My interactions with the ones here have been limited and fine, but I'm sure they cause havoc for some.  I wouldn't want to encourage them.  I pretty much let them be but do not mind when they stop by and then get on their way.  My ex-MIL used to feed the stray cats in her neighborhood, and she ended up getting some not-so-polite push back from her neighbors.  I understand why! Cats are great, but for all the reasons you mentioned it does not seem wise to befriend ferals or strays or encourage them to stick around.  I guess it was more a comment that I don't mind them stopping by as much as some of the other creatures who have visited.  But, I do take your point.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Juvenal on August 30, 2019, 02:02:52 PM
Deer me!  So many mentions of the artiodactyl plague.  Some friends have given up on hostas.  Other friends have groundhogs to finish things off.  Bring back the wolves.  Die, "Bambi," die!  I speak dispassionately, having neither of these mammals anywhere close enough to affect my so-called "garden."
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 30, 2019, 05:13:59 PM
Quote
The bears are enough of a problem that the town is discussing requiring bear-proof containers for all residents.

How do the residents get in and out of the containers???

<ducks and runs...>

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: polly_mer on August 30, 2019, 05:39:12 PM
Quote
The bears are enough of a problem that the town is discussing requiring bear-proof containers for all residents.

How do the residents get in and out of the containers???

<ducks and runs...>

M.
We have lots of engineers who are good with latching technology.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 31, 2019, 07:32:19 PM
Quote
The bears are enough of a problem that the town is discussing requiring bear-proof containers for all residents.

How do the residents get in and out of the containers???

<ducks and runs...>

M.
We have lots of engineers who are good with latching technology.

Well done.

;--》

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on September 01, 2019, 05:27:33 AM
I encountered a coyote, a fox, and a herd of deer this morning on my travels.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on September 01, 2019, 07:23:43 AM
One rabbit while walking the dog about dawn.  I wonder what size of home range a suburban rabbit would have?  We were far enough away from home that I doubt it's one of 'mine'.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on September 03, 2019, 05:10:30 AM
I can now add a very large skunk to my fauna encounters list. Fortunately, we each went our own way, amicably.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: waterboy on September 03, 2019, 12:29:03 PM
Came across an unfortunately deceased gray fox this morning. Common but rarely seen...like the bobcat I did see this summer.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on September 06, 2019, 04:33:27 PM
Lots of very interesting sightings! I am sorry to hear about the gray fox.  And I miss seeing deer (but not having a constant fear of hitting them at certain times of the year).  We used to have some in my neighborhood who were pretty funny.  I guess they were a deer family.  They'd come up from the canal/woods area in the mornings as a group, walk up the street and through a neighbor's yard, then return as a group in the evening and go back to the canal.  It's like they were going to work every day.  I don't know if I talked about this elsewhere.  If so, I might have mentioned that my oldest had to go to the bus stop very early in the morning (and no streetlights in the neighborhood) and would occasionally hear hooves clopping along behind her closer than she wished.

Anyway, my latest sighting is (thankfully, not mine! but the info was conveyed by a neighbor) a rattlesnake in our yard.  Woo hoo.  And our exterminator came for the quarterly visit and found hobo spiders.  I know their venom is not considered toxic to humans, but I would rather not.  They're over by where some of the black widows tend to hang out.  No new tarantula sightings yet.  Exterminator confirmed that tarantulas are not the "bad" spiders like black widow, brown recluse, and hobo, which I think are the top 3 arachnid villains, and tarantulas can be helpful.  But, he did say that I should watch out if one turns its back on me, because they shoot something out of their behind area (he said something about hair) that goes into the throat, nose, etc. of the enemy.  They apparently use this tactic on coyotes.  Lots to learn.

I have not yet (knock on wood) encountered a ringtail cat or a scorpion yet. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on September 10, 2019, 12:20:20 PM
Monarch butterflies are now migrating through and one of them laid eggs on my milkweeds, so I have young caterpillars!  I haven't had much luck growing milkweeds - I buy plants in spring and they die in fall instead of being perennials - but that may be changing b/c some of the seeds sprouted.  They're not in desirable places and don't look like their parental varieties, but I'm keeping them anyways!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 10, 2019, 12:27:29 PM
Cool!

I remember going past a parking lot near a lot of tall buildings and seeing monarchs.

Looked a little closer, and there was a lone milkweed growing out of a crack in the sidewalk near the fence.

Urban butterflies do exist...

:--}

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 10, 2019, 12:32:47 PM
Hmmmm.  I should plant some milkweed.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on September 10, 2019, 12:44:04 PM
Hmmmm.  I should plant some milkweed.

I agree.  :)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: fast_and_bulbous on September 11, 2019, 12:31:33 AM
Hmmmm.  I should plant some milkweed.
Butterfly bush is highly recommended as well. It also smells divine (to me).
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on September 11, 2019, 11:45:59 AM
I miss my butterfly bush! I second that idea. 

We had another black and white furry critter on the back patio last night.  Between these guys and the tarantulas and snakes, I feel validated for insisting that the patio light be on before we head out there.  This one had its tail up the whole time, nosing around here and there, under the grill, etc.  I'm glad we saw it before opening the door, as it was just about two feet away at the time.  I'm sure that would have been a fun surprise for all.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on September 14, 2019, 09:24:24 AM
If I'd been more alert a couple of days ago I'd still have two monarch caterpillars.  Instead, I have one.  Also, its abrupt increase in size led to some internet searching and I now fear that it's a cannibal.

The long story is both caterpillars were on a rather small plant.  I saw eggs laid on the larger plant, but have never seen caterpillars there.  One recent evening I noticed that there were only about 4 leaves left on the small plant.  Silly me assumed that four leaves was adequate food for the night and I could wait and move them to the large plant in the morning.  In the morning there was one much larger caterpillar busily eating the now-leafless milkweed stem.  I successfully moved it and have seen no sign of the other.

Live and learn, I guess.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 14, 2019, 12:35:40 PM
Nature red in tooth and mandible....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on September 16, 2019, 05:38:02 AM
Lots of deer yesterday.  Almost hit one, but wasn't going fast (curvy road) and slammed on brakes.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 16, 2019, 10:31:46 AM
I watched two chipmunks outside my office run headlong into each other 3 times in rapid succession, the scurry away.  I'd never seen a fight like that before.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 16, 2019, 01:35:30 PM
Fighting?

Or Alvin running into Simon,  who's lost his glasses?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 17, 2019, 08:59:13 AM
Fighting?

Or Alvin running into Simon,  who's lost his glasses?

M.

I though it was just a silly collision (think Far Side "Nature Scenes We rarely See (https://imgur.com/t/garylarson/GJlK9)"), but the repetition led me to conclude conflict.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 17, 2019, 09:24:35 AM
Were they males? Was there a female nearby?

Stag fights?

Or over food?

(Now I'm recalling the Chipmunks with those reindeer antler things tied to their heads and butting away...don't mind me, I'm in editing mode at the moment...)

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 18, 2019, 11:22:38 AM
Were they males? Was there a female nearby?

I can't tell them apart from a distance.

Only they know the difference. (https://ifunny.co/picture/only-they-know-the-difference-DRvWDjOt5)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: miss jane marple on September 18, 2019, 11:31:20 AM
If I'm recalling correctly, the female chipmunks wear skirts...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Kron3007 on September 18, 2019, 01:59:57 PM
Wild turkeys everywhere!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 20, 2019, 03:33:31 AM
If I'm recalling correctly, the female chipmunks wear skirts...

..and bows, right?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on September 20, 2019, 01:53:10 PM
Wild turkeys everywhere!
There was a wild turkey named Gus that roamed near my college campus.  Not sure how it got its name.  It was killed by a van on the local town thoroughfare.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on September 20, 2019, 03:20:20 PM
There is a tree frog who has apparently decided that our watering can, atop the rain barrel, is their personal (frogonal?) swimming hole or nap spot. 
I'm charmed.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on September 21, 2019, 08:38:12 AM
There is a tree frog who has apparently decided that our watering can, atop the rain barrel, is their personal (frogonal?) swimming hole or nap spot. 
I'm charmed.

So am I.  That sounds like the perfect spot - sheltered & humid.

I had to stop yardwork the other day to photograph a gray tree frog who was resting in the opening to an old birdhouse.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on October 31, 2019, 12:46:26 PM
According to spouse's hypothesis based on the evidence present at the scene, a coyote visited our back patio last night and may have played with one of spouse's outdoor shoes.  Maybe it was partaking in Mischief Night festivities.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on November 03, 2019, 06:30:24 AM
HUGE rat on my back stoop last night, courtesy of one of the barn kitties. Thanks! I didn't need for it to be dragged all the way up from the barn to prove your ratting prowess! The LGD (livestock guardian dog) was also very active last night - the coyotes must have been out and about. It's one reason I don't worry about the ancient barn cats - they are great protection for everything. I looked at the camera footage, though, and didn't see anything other than her pacing and the goats sleeping.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on November 05, 2019, 10:50:49 AM
That sounds both yuck and eerie, backatit!

We had a rather impudent fox last night.  We were stepping out onto the back patio when I spotted it a couple feet away, walking along our fence line.  It had been headed away from the house and looked to be crossing through the fence out to the street area, but it stopped and looked at us and hopped down and headed our way instead, as if we were intruding on its space! I kicked the door closed.  I don't know what its intentions were, but if I needed to go hand-to-paw with it I first needed to put my glass of wine down at least.  When we were somewhat mentally prepared to deal with the fox, we headed back out, but it had (supposedly) left the scene.  Maybe it was hiding, who knows.  It didn't show its surly and entitled face again last night, thankfully.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on November 05, 2019, 11:53:50 AM
That sounds both yuck and eerie, backatit!

We had a rather impudent fox last night.  We were stepping out onto the back patio when I spotted it a couple feet away, walking along our fence line.  It had been headed away from the house and looked to be crossing through the fence out to the street area, but it stopped and looked at us and hopped down and headed our way instead, as if we were intruding on its space! I kicked the door closed.  I don't know what its intentions were, but if I needed to go hand-to-paw with it I first needed to put my glass of wine down at least.  When we were somewhat mentally prepared to deal with the fox, we headed back out, but it had (supposedly) left the scene.  Maybe it was hiding, who knows.  It didn't show its surly and entitled face again last night, thankfully.

Your neighbors may be feeding it--
Foxes make it very clear how domestication happens. We have a family cabin in the mountains that comes with a semi-domesticated fox (or foxes-- we took pictures of their markings this summer to try to figure out if there was more than one but couldn't agree) which makes daily circuits around all the cabins that feed it (including my grandmother, who gives it things like hotdogs she buys just for it, and toast with jam. We lost the battle in suggesting his might not be good for it). It has gotten to the point where if there isn't food out for it it will walk right up to the glass door and sit there looking at you with its head cocked in a way it must have learned humans find irresistible. I'm pretty sure if you opened the door and held out food it would trot right in.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on November 05, 2019, 12:34:02 PM
That could very well be, Puget! I would be a little surprised given all the push back around my area about "wild" animals, but you never know.  This one definitely seemed as though it would have been fine joining us for some wine or, maybe, enjoying the wine without us.  It's my first time being that close to a fox, so I guess it's good to hear if maybe it was just domesticated and not homicidal.  Just one more critter to keep an eye out for.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on November 05, 2019, 12:47:09 PM
That could very well be, Puget! I would be a little surprised given all the push back around my area about "wild" animals, but you never know.  This one definitely seemed as though it would have been fine joining us for some wine or, maybe, enjoying the wine without us.  It's my first time being that close to a fox, so I guess it's good to hear if maybe it was just domesticated and not homicidal.  Just one more critter to keep an eye out for.

I will just leave this here for anyone interested in fox domestication, genetics, and Soviet history (and who wouldn't be really?):
https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/radiolab/segments/91696-new-nice
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on November 05, 2019, 02:47:03 PM
That could very well be, Puget! I would be a little surprised given all the push back around my area about "wild" animals, but you never know.  This one definitely seemed as though it would have been fine joining us for some wine or, maybe, enjoying the wine without us.  It's my first time being that close to a fox, so I guess it's good to hear if maybe it was just domesticated and not homicidal.  Just one more critter to keep an eye out for.

I will just leave this here for anyone interested in fox domestication, genetics, and Soviet history (and who wouldn't be really?):
https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/radiolab/segments/91696-new-nice

That was pretty interesting all around, especially the end.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on November 16, 2019, 08:37:14 AM
If anyone follows earthquakes, there is an on-going swarm of small & shallow earthquakes just SW of Iceland, underwater, on the Reykjanes ridge.  It's been going on for about four hours now - so far, the largest was a magnitude 4.6.

https://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 16, 2019, 08:48:58 AM
Wow. I hadn't realized Iceland sits directly atop the mid Atlantic Ridge.

Talk about being on the growing edge of things....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Juvenal on November 16, 2019, 08:50:51 AM
Wow. I hadn't realized Iceland sits directly atop the mid Atlantic Ridge.

Talk about being on the growing edge of things....

M.

It's Splitsville for Icelanders.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on November 16, 2019, 08:57:36 AM
Wow. I hadn't realized Iceland sits directly atop the mid Atlantic Ridge.

Talk about being on the growing edge of things....

M.

Yep - growing from volcanism along one side and eroding away on the other!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 16, 2019, 02:45:25 PM
In the last few days, a pile of sea otters, some bald eagles, and a grey whale. Possibly a glimpse of seal.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: professor_pat on November 17, 2019, 07:45:41 PM
Woohoo, sounds like a nice submarine volcanic eruption off the Reykjanes Peninsula! Thanks for sharing that, Thursdays_Child.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 18, 2019, 07:04:14 AM
Wow. I hadn't realized Iceland sits directly atop the mid Atlantic Ridge.

Talk about being on the growing edge of things....

M.

Yep - growing from volcanism along one side and eroding away on the other!

Everything's so politicized these days, it wouldn't be too surprising to see a student protest with signs saying "Down with Vulcanism"....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Anselm on November 18, 2019, 03:51:11 PM
Iceland is lacking in fauna with only the Arctic Fox as its only native mammal.  Other things like reindeer were introduced by settlers.  An occasional polar bear lands there on its chunk of ice.  The locals believe that elves and trolls are hiding in the interior.  You can take a tour to where they filmed some scenes from Game of Thrones at the mid-Atlantic Ridge, specifically at Thingvellir.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on December 01, 2019, 12:45:36 PM
We had another couple of fox incidents.  One night while we were sitting on the patio, I looked to the left and saw a fox heading toward us not too far from where we first had spotted the first one.  Spouse scared it away.  Then, a few minutes later, I looked to the right and saw something through some tree leaves.  Something fox-sized! Sure enough, it was a fox.  At first, we thought the left side one had circled around the house to approach from the other side, but spouse said this one was bigger.  He chased that one off as well.  A couple nights later, I saw something perched on one of our fence posts (a square rock fixture).  At first I thought it was a cat.  It was not.  Spouse thinks it was the littler fox.  It just sat there looking at us while we tried in vain to get a good picture of it.  Once spouse finally remembered how to use his good camera, it hopped down and went wherever.  Oh well.  He thought he saw it ambling up the road a day or so after that.

I need to get a new phone (would love not to, but this one keeps crashing) and was trying to figure out how much storage is needed.  Spouse reminded me that I might need extra storage for the videos I take of cats.  Apparently, I am cat lady.  Not a surprise, but always interesting to hear what people think of first in these situations.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on December 14, 2019, 06:46:36 AM
The lake is frozen and has become a highway for wildlife.  One male deer crossed to check out opportunities to the west, then went back to collect his harem.

As in previous years, a fox crosses from west to east in the morning and returns late afternoon every day.

And otters are crouching by cracks in the ice waiting for fish.

My desk faces all this-- a great break from marking and writing.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on December 16, 2019, 03:30:08 PM
Sounds a lot cooler than most of what I get to see, Catherder!  Our local pond doesn't freeze over, for one thing.

I did recently have a rare up-close armadillo sighting.  It's amazing how those short-legged critters can try to bound like a deer when they're running.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Wahoo Redux on December 16, 2019, 04:00:39 PM
I never realized how beautiful fungus could be unless one looks at it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on December 17, 2019, 05:28:24 AM
Sounds a lot cooler than most of what I get to see, Catherder!  Our local pond doesn't freeze over, for one thing.

I did recently have a rare up-close armadillo sighting.  It's amazing how those short-legged critters can try to bound like a deer when they're running.

An armadillo is pretty cool!

The fox that crosses the lake is a grey fox, the one that keeps trying to dig its way into my shed is red.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on December 17, 2019, 06:07:56 AM
My cats are launching themselves at windows trying to get to squirrels on feeders.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on December 30, 2019, 09:29:07 AM
Several days ago I was watching the sunset from a semi-open utility pipeline cut area behind my parents' house (they live well out of town), and saw a bat flying overhead.  I watched it pass back and forth for quite some time.  They definitely don't move like birds.  The aerobatics they make are amazing.  The only sound it made that my human ears could hear was the occasional flutter of wings.

Several days later Dad saw what he thinks might have been a pair of bears some distance down the pipeline.  He didn't have binoculars handy to make a positive identification.  Bear sightings where they live would be plausible, though.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on December 30, 2019, 04:39:12 PM
my father has a fish pond. He feeds the fish about 5 pm everyday.  About 510 every day a great blue heron lands a bit away and then walks to the spot that my dad feeds the fish.  Im not sure how successful he has been but I did see him with a pretty big fish earlier this week, but it was much earlier than feeding time and he was at the other end of the pond. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on December 30, 2019, 04:43:37 PM
my parents live in a rural area.

While driving to civilization, I drove past 3 turkeys (toms) .
On the way home, on the other side of the road, I passed 3 pigs!  (probably yearlings, as they didnt look like they would be much bigger than 50 pounds or so.. ... (the right size for eating!!)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on January 06, 2020, 11:39:00 AM
Be wary of feral pigs, Clean.  They're highly destructive and should be killed whenever possible, but they're also known to attack humans and to carry some nasty parasites.

I didn't know my yard had deer mice - and had forgotten how much prettier than other mice they are.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Aster on January 06, 2020, 12:40:00 PM
Feral cats are both my joy and my bane.

Feral cats are so cute. Feral kittens are super cute.

But feral cats kill every other wild animal larger than an ant, so I am sad. No birds. No frogs. No squirrels. No rabbits. No lizards. No beetles. Cats are like the atomic bomb of invasive species.

Feral kittens got into my outdoor pots last week. What a mess.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on January 06, 2020, 12:56:04 PM
A few years ago a small feral cat was visiting our back door--we named her LBK for "little black kitty".  I asked the local animal shelter for advice, and they said they could take her if I could at least partially "socialize" her.  After a few weeks of my putting out food and treats, LBK would let me stroke her and check her for parasites.

Then one day she showed up during a horrible sleet storm, so I reached out and pulled her indoors. She went nuts, climbed all the walls, landing on the stove, the washer and the microwave, and finally fled out the door when I opened it.

She never came back.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on January 06, 2020, 03:00:54 PM
Quote
Be wary of feral pigs, Clean.  They're highly destructive and should be killed whenever possible

I used to really enjoy pig hunting, when I had a place to do it.  They can be very tasty when less than a year old... big enough to have some meat on them, fat enough to be flavorful, but not mature enough to be gamy (if male) or have piglets if female (and lose all of the fat when nursing)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on January 06, 2020, 03:02:48 PM
Coyote problems!!  At the Airport!!!

My last flight out of my current town was delayed because a coyote was too close to the runway!  They had to use a John Deere Tractor to chase it far enough away to not be a problem for the plane!!

Not a Big City Problem (usually, anyway!!) but coyotes are now Everywhere!!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on January 06, 2020, 05:57:51 PM
Strange that - we had a BIG coyote walking down the road today. I wish I could keep the small dogs in for a few days till he makes his way out of the neighborhood (till his next round - he seems to come by every couple of weeks and he's bold as brass). I need to get them coyote vests.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on January 07, 2020, 07:33:47 AM
Coyote problems!!  At the Airport!!!

My last flight out of my current town was delayed because a coyote was too close to the runway!  They had to use a John Deere Tractor to chase it far enough away to not be a problem for the plane!!

Not a Big City Problem (usually, anyway!!) but coyotes are now Everywhere!!

I've seen that happen with a plain old stray dog before.  While waiting for our flight we saw the spectacle of a guy in a pickup making several passes at it to run it off.  Don't know whether it delayed any flights.  Ours wasn't.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on January 07, 2020, 08:37:46 AM
Our new Kitten, Orestes, is a natural hunter.  This morning Smolt found him playing with a (now dead) mouse.  Impressive that he caught a mouse when he never goes outside.

Hmmm....now I need to find out where they are getting in.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on January 07, 2020, 09:23:53 AM
Our new Kitten, Orestes, is a natural hunter.  This morning Smolt found him playing with a (now dead) mouse.  Impressive that he caught a mouse when he never goes outside.

Hmmm....now I need to find out where they are getting in.

Best mouse deterrent ever:  soak cotton balls in peppermint oil (available in health food stores) and toss them in the bottom of all your cupboards, or in any suspicious crevices.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on January 07, 2020, 10:54:31 AM
While taking my morning walk I found a dead rat lying in the street.  It's the first time I've ever seen a rat in any condition in the street, anywhere.  I hope it isn't a bad sign.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on January 08, 2020, 01:20:00 PM
While taking my morning walk I found a dead rat lying in the street.  It's the first time I've ever seen a rat in any condition in the street, anywhere.  I hope it isn't a bad sign.

It was for the rat ...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on January 08, 2020, 01:31:37 PM
Quote
Quote from: apl68 on January 07, 2020, 10:54:31 AM
While taking my morning walk I found a dead rat lying in the street.  It's the first time I've ever seen a rat in any condition in the street, anywhere.  I hope it isn't a bad sign.

It was for the rat ...

Ive seen news where a bird drops a fish.  The last I remember was a bird that dropped a fish and broke someone's windshield!

So it may have been a bad sign for the bird that may have lost its meal!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on January 08, 2020, 03:40:34 PM
I was travelling last week and saw: pronghorns, elk, coyotes, a red fox, bald eagles, some kind of small eagle or perhaps a hawk, and ubiquitous ravens and crows.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on January 09, 2020, 08:33:07 AM
Quote
Quote from: apl68 on January 07, 2020, 10:54:31 AM
While taking my morning walk I found a dead rat lying in the street.  It's the first time I've ever seen a rat in any condition in the street, anywhere.  I hope it isn't a bad sign.

It was for the rat ...

Ive seen news where a bird drops a fish.  The last I remember was a bird that dropped a fish and broke someone's windshield!

So it may have been a bad sign for the bird that may have lost its meal!

It never occurred to me that some raptor might have lost its lunch there, so to speak. 

I have seen a hawk take a squirrel, on the edge of Vanderbilt University's campus no less.  I also once saw a bird repeatedly try to grab a cicada that still had a lot of fight left in it.  After the third try the bird decided it wasn't worth it and went looking for a less combative meal.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on January 09, 2020, 09:26:40 AM
Yes, likewise, twice: Once at the site of the first known Maypole in the colonies: I was scaling the knoll up to the top of the hill and a big rush of breeze and a loud flapping sound startled me into looking up....to a very bloody rabbit being lifted up and away by a huge hawk.

The other was outside my back deck, when I had a deck. A Red Hawk had located a chipmunk for its lunch.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: marceltr on January 10, 2020, 06:26:57 AM
I prefer grow some mj in litlle boxes:-)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on January 11, 2020, 05:54:16 PM
I have seen hawks on campus (a little scary at times), but I have thankfully not seen a rat anywhere in person yet (except in a psych lab).  Today I did see what I can only assume is a peacock on the side of the road.  I'll have to look it up, but spouse seemed nonchalant about its presence, so I guess there are some around here.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on January 12, 2020, 05:34:54 AM
Last night sitting at a beachside restaurant with some friends, and a rat ran across the fence above our heads. Not surprising, given the area, but funny.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Wahoo Redux on January 15, 2020, 10:18:50 AM
I have seen hawks on campus (a little scary at times), but I have thankfully not seen a rat anywhere in person yet (except in a psych lab).  Today I did see what I can only assume is a peacock on the side of the road.  I'll have to look it up, but spouse seemed nonchalant about its presence, so I guess there are some around here.

We have peacocks in my childhood neighborhood, non-indigenous.  A local farmer used to raise them.  I guess the farm died or he let them go or they escaped.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on January 15, 2020, 03:24:29 PM
Our university meeting with the president was today.  The important issue for this forum is that in December 16 critters were relocated (to someone else's neighborhood I suppose).

The list included:
8 skunks!
6 coons
2 opossum

One of the biggest (most divisive) issues on my campus is the cat population.  I have stayed out of it, but there is an organized (!) effort to feed them (but only at specific locations and for limited times to limit the food available to attract the more unwanted, less controversial critters like the 16 removed).  The cat group also traps some of the cats, have them 'fixed' (though I would suspect that the cats didnt know that they were 'broken'), and then they are returned and released back on campus. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on January 16, 2020, 12:08:19 PM
That's an awful lot of skunks!  They do come in batches sometimes, though.  One of our staff members had repeated skunk invasions at her house a while back.  The poor lady seemed at her wits' end for a while there.  They think they've finally fixed the problem now.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on January 16, 2020, 04:51:45 PM
I teach late in the day ( not exactly by choice) and I often leave when it is dark.  I have often seen skunks.  And there have been many that didnt quite make it across the street as well!!  I doubt that 8 is the total skunk population! 

All I can say is that they aint cats and when I see one, I allow them the right of way! 

Given that the president's remarks on the topic included an apology to a faculty member and a remark, "i wish we could have done this sooner" I suspect that someone was on the bad end of one of those skunks! 

I wonder if that may trigger a 'workman's comp' response? 
AS they are carriers of rabies, I wonder if their presence posed a liability issue for the campus? 

Any thoughts? 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on January 17, 2020, 04:14:20 PM
I was once 6 inches away from patting the back of the "nice kitty" that had crossed my path on the quiet, twilit sidewalk in front of a student's home....

Then I saw the white stripe and just as quietly backed away....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on January 18, 2020, 03:49:49 AM
LOL, that would have been dire!

I'm visiting one of the grown kids, and they live near a canal in Florida. We've been walking down every day to see the piles (herds? What do you call a plethora of them?) manatee who are congregating there. Usually they do it when it's cold but it's been in the 70's. The babies look like fat ticks with their undersized heads :).
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on January 20, 2020, 08:41:30 AM
I was once 6 inches away from patting the back of the "nice kitty" that had crossed my path on the quiet, twilit sidewalk in front of a student's home....

Then I saw the white stripe and just as quietly backed away....

M.

The old Pepe Le Pew error, only in reverse!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Anselm on January 20, 2020, 09:38:08 AM
LOL, that would have been dire!

I'm visiting one of the grown kids, and they live near a canal in Florida. We've been walking down every day to see the piles (herds? What do you call a plethora of them?) manatee who are congregating there. Usually they do it when it's cold but it's been in the 70's. The babies look like fat ticks with their undersized heads :).



An aggregation.

https://www.livescience.com/27405-manatees.html
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on January 21, 2020, 08:06:39 AM
The lake is frozen solid again, and deer are cantering across, white tails flapping.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on January 21, 2020, 08:25:54 AM
It's scarcely gotten cold enough around here for a mud puddle to freeze over during the past several years.  I did have a close-ish encounter with a deer near the park pond before sunrise this morning.  I assume that's what I heard snorting and dashing away in the dark.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on January 30, 2020, 06:57:53 PM
Got a photo of a squirrel enjoying a nut on the exterior window ledge at my library the other day.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on January 31, 2020, 08:35:58 AM
Thinking of one of our forumites' names, I was interested to discover that cat cafe's in Japan now include Capybaras among their furry, friendly denizens.

I always wondered what that forumite might look like...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on February 01, 2020, 09:16:46 AM
If anyone follows earthquakes, there is an on-going swarm of small & shallow earthquakes just SW of Iceland, underwater, on the Reykjanes ridge.  It's been going on for about four hours now - so far, the largest was a magnitude 4.6.

https://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes

And it's still going on, both there and along the R. peninsula - rather vigorously recently.  There is apparently a "very small" amount of magma intrusion (1 million cubic meters doesn't seem small, but the volcanologists should know what they're talking about) ongoing under Mt. Thorbjorn.  An eruption isn't considered imminent.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on February 02, 2020, 01:36:01 AM
The song, "Shake, Rattle, and Roll," comes to mind...

Stay safe!

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on February 04, 2020, 11:13:39 AM
The first otter I've seen this winter is perched, fishing, on the ice at the edge of open water on the lake. 

On firmer ground, a variety of squirrels, black, red and grey, are dashing around the lawn.  All, including the otter, are engaging in a lot of tail-flicking.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on February 04, 2020, 12:40:03 PM
I saw, what I believe to be, a red-shouldered hawk in my backyard last week. It was perching in a tree about 25 ft. from my kitchen window. I also witnessed a hawk (red-tail maybe?) swoop down from a tree and grab something on campus.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on February 04, 2020, 02:25:04 PM
The first otter I've seen this winter is perched, fishing, on the ice at the edge of open water on the lake. 

On firmer ground, a variety of squirrels, black, red and grey, are dashing around the lawn.  All, including the otter, are engaging in a lot of tail-flicking.

Otters are some of my favorite animals. I've seen them in my neighbor's pond but ours is a little too exposed for their taste, I think. I used to work on a big cattle ranch when I was a grad student (I was developing a program to count and track purebred cattle herds) and right down the road from the office was a creek, and the otters LOVED that area. I'd take my lunch down there and sit with them, and some of the babies got quite used to me during the couple of years I worked there, and would sit near me, hoping for a bit of tuna.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on February 04, 2020, 03:02:09 PM
Before the property next to mine was sold and landscaped, there was an otters' burrow in the creek bank within sight of my desk.

In winter the young otters would play, sliding down the creek, and in summer they chased each other right under my window.

Sadly they are scarcer now.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on February 05, 2020, 06:21:15 AM
Before the property next to mine was sold and landscaped, there was an otters' burrow in the creek bank within sight of my desk.

In winter the young otters would play, sliding down the creek, and in summer they chased each other right under my window.

Sadly they are scarcer now.

Sad.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on February 05, 2020, 06:40:26 AM
That IS sad. I saw the herd of red deer at Fountains Abbey in Yorkshire on a hike this winter. That was the high point of my winter trip to visit family there. I saw a rather large herd at the barn the other day, too, though, which was cool. American deer are huge!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on February 05, 2020, 06:44:43 AM
Before the property next to mine was sold and landscaped, there was an otters' burrow in the creek bank within sight of my desk.

In winter the young otters would play, sliding down the creek, and in summer they chased each other right under my window.

Sadly they are scarcer now.

Sad.

On the bright side, the new owner got a $10,000 CDN fine for destroying habitat. The creek and lake shore along his property belong to the local conservation authority.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on February 08, 2020, 05:33:11 AM
That IS sad. I saw the herd of red deer at Fountains Abbey in Yorkshire on a hike this winter. That was the high point of my winter trip to visit family there. I saw a rather large herd at the barn the other day, too, though, which was cool. American deer are huge!

We have (basically) two kinds:  white tailed and mule.  Mule deer are larger.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on February 08, 2020, 05:33:37 AM
Before the property next to mine was sold and landscaped, there was an otters' burrow in the creek bank within sight of my desk.

In winter the young otters would play, sliding down the creek, and in summer they chased each other right under my window.

Sadly they are scarcer now.

Sad.

On the bright side, the new owner got a $10,000 CDN fine for destroying habitat. The creek and lake shore along his property belong to the local conservation authority.

Karma!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on February 08, 2020, 05:51:57 AM
Yes, but will the otters come back?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on February 08, 2020, 01:11:37 PM
I just stopped my car to let a coyote cross the lane in front of my house--first one I've seen in a couple of years.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on March 04, 2020, 07:34:39 AM
 Two young otters just trotted across the lawn to the lake.  And two handsome foxes are using the lawn as a throughway, and a place to case squirrels.

I repeat: spring just might have arrived.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 04, 2020, 06:42:01 PM
Glad some others are back.

But do two others a spring make?

;--}

M.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on March 05, 2020, 10:26:17 AM
Treefrogs are out and about around here.  One hopped across the patio the other evening and then scaled a brick wall (with some help from me when it got stuck at an apparently slippery spot near the top) and vanished into a tree.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 05, 2020, 06:16:58 PM
It's early for this but there are places near a large pond where the town sets out driving recommendation for times when the spring peepers have to cross the road for breeding purposes.

That earlier note was intended as "two otters" by the way. Auto-correct needs to be taken down a peg!

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on March 08, 2020, 08:29:34 AM
Treefrogs are out and about around here.  One hopped across the patio the other evening and then scaled a brick wall (with some help from me when it got stuck at an apparently slippery spot near the top) and vanished into a tree.

My good feel for the day!  Thanks!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on March 08, 2020, 03:27:45 PM
We were walking in Greensboro's Revolutionary War battlefield park--along with lots of other people and their dogs--and saw a rather fast-moving young deer run across the road about 1.5 football fields ahead of us, very near some young women from one of the local colleges.

It was moving--sproing, sproing, sproing, and then gone into the newly green underbrush.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on March 08, 2020, 03:39:49 PM
Somebody saw a pod of orcas in one of the bays this morning. All I've seen are ducks, cormorants, and a couple seals.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on March 08, 2020, 04:50:16 PM
Two signs of spring at the local wildlife refuge today-- the muskrats are back up and doing, and the redwing blackbirds are back.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on March 08, 2020, 04:57:27 PM
The weeds in my front yard have already gone to seed.  The little seed pods follow very small,pretty little purple flowers. I made the mistake a few years ago of mowing them rather than pulling them and now I have to pull the weeds a few times in February and March just to keep them somewhat controlled the following year. I doubt that I will ever get on top of them again.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 09, 2020, 09:16:46 AM
A No Dumping sign
The redbud bloom above it
Draws my gaze upward
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 10, 2020, 11:43:41 AM
The blooming clover
Makes lawns white like the snowfall
We missed this winter
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 10, 2020, 12:52:11 PM
The blooming clover
Makes lawns white like the snowfall
We missed this winter

Lovely!

Enjoying the random acts of haiku.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on March 11, 2020, 07:44:17 AM
Such a delightful relief to come here after reading the Covid 19 news.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on March 11, 2020, 08:09:12 AM
Such a delightful relief to come here after reading the Covid 19 news.

So true.  If it cheers you up any, I had a young fox trot right under my window. "Fox!" I exclaimed, and I swear he chortled "heh, heh" as he passed by.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 11, 2020, 10:36:25 AM
The blooming clover
Makes lawns white like the snowfall
We missed this winter

Lovely!

Enjoying the random acts of haiku.

M.

Thanks!  I hadn't composed any haiku in a long, long time.  Now my mind is finally thinking haiku-shaped thoughts again.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on March 14, 2020, 10:18:31 AM
Yesterday my cat noticed the teensiest - maybe an inch long, but I doubt it - box turtle I've ever seen!  It has to be from last year's hatch.  Last summer had so many hot dry spells that my first thought was of the improbability of it's survival.  Then I remembered that the shrubs where it was found are among those where I put a little sprinkler for the birds during hot spells.  Teeny is now in protective custody because I need to do some yardwork around and under those shrubs.  Also, my first act will be to very carefully remove all leaves and thoroughly check for siblings!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on March 14, 2020, 02:57:10 PM
Yesterday my cat noticed the teensiest - maybe an inch long, but I doubt it - box turtle I've ever seen!  It has to be from last year's hatch.  Last summer had so many hot dry spells that my first thought was of the improbability of it's survival.  Then I remembered that the shrubs where it was found are among those where I put a little sprinkler for the birds during hot spells.  Teeny is now in protective custody because I need to do some yardwork around and under those shrubs.  Also, my first act will be to very carefully remove all leaves and thoroughly check for siblings!
Ooh!  How exciting!

Our chipmunks have reemerged.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 16, 2020, 10:47:50 AM
Among the grey trees
A spray of bright white petals
The year's first dogwood
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 16, 2020, 11:13:03 AM
Among the grey trees
A spray of bright white petals
The year's first dogwood

Oh, yes.

Reminds me of this:

   https://www.icp.org/browse/archive/objects/dogwood-and-oak-trees

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on March 16, 2020, 05:49:14 PM
Among the grey trees
A spray of bright white petals
The year's first dogwood

May I copy and paste to my FB page?  How do I credit you?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 17, 2020, 07:05:35 AM
Among the grey trees
A spray of bright white petals
The year's first dogwood

May I copy and paste to my FB page?  How do I credit you?

Sure!  I guess you can just credit it to somebody you know online.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on March 18, 2020, 05:49:44 AM
Among the grey trees
A spray of bright white petals
The year's first dogwood

May I copy and paste to my FB page?  How do I credit you?


Thank you!
Sure!  I guess you can just credit it to somebody you know online.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on March 22, 2020, 07:29:56 AM
First butterflies a few days ago; first firefly yesterday evening.  Spring is springing early and fast this year.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 25, 2020, 07:39:50 AM
Beneath a grey sky
Great outbursts of new color
Fragrance in the air
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 25, 2020, 07:43:33 AM
First butterflies a few days ago; first firefly yesterday evening.  Spring is springing early and fast this year.

We don't seem to get fireflies here; I remember whole fields of them, growing up...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 25, 2020, 10:01:12 AM
We still have them out near my parents' house.  I can walk down the road there in the summer and it looks like all the stars have come down to our level.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on March 25, 2020, 10:25:13 AM

We don't seem to get fireflies here; I remember whole fields of them, growing up...

M.

Yeah, we don't seem to have them here on the west coast, either. Growing up back east, though, there were loads. I miss them.


For my part: loads of hawks and bald eagles these days. Will go check out the seals this evening.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on March 25, 2020, 10:37:45 AM
We have them here in Ontario, but yes, there were lots more on the East Coast.  I have fond memories of my cat leaping up trying to catch them there.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on March 25, 2020, 04:53:57 PM
I miss fireflies, too.  I grew up in the mid-Atlantic US, and there were so many at times lighting up the backyard.  None here, unfortunately.  It was weird to get used to.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on March 25, 2020, 07:50:31 PM
Our seals were complemented by a single passing sea lion just as we left.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on March 26, 2020, 10:14:08 AM
Found one of the Thundercats in my office chair low-growling out the window where she is usually chirp-watching the bird feeder.    Under the feeder, a fox basking in the sun.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on March 26, 2020, 10:16:25 AM
We haven't seen our foxes around recently.  There was a cat on the patio last night, though.  And a bunny or two has come back to the yard.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on March 26, 2020, 10:26:10 AM
The last fox I saw crossed the ice on the lake two days ago. Before he made it all the way east the ice sheet he was on  tipped and he scrambled for land.

Haven't seen one since, and yes, the rabbits are back here too.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on March 26, 2020, 04:13:09 PM
Bobcat snoozing in the back yard; hares in the front.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on March 27, 2020, 05:16:07 AM
Bobcat snoozing in the back yard; hares in the front.

WOW!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 27, 2020, 06:40:03 AM
Do they know about each other, I wonder?

Or perhaps they're practicing social distancing....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on March 27, 2020, 07:17:16 PM
Quote
Do they know about each other, I wonder?

Or perhaps they're practicing social distancing....

M.

Perhaps they are segregationists!  (rabbits can be such racists!) 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on March 28, 2020, 05:44:03 AM
To be nearer my 91 year old mother, I am staying on a coastal island where idiot tourists and stupid residents feed the deer.  Two of them stood expectantly off the back porch this morning, as my dog barked madly, assuming food was coming.  Bipeds ....grrrrr.....
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 30, 2020, 07:54:29 AM
On an old house place
Jonquils still bloom long after
The planters are gone
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on March 30, 2020, 08:32:36 AM
On an old house place
Jonquils still bloom long after
The planters are gone

Don't know whether it was intended, but I like the wordplay with "planters."
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 30, 2020, 09:56:29 AM
On an old house place
Jonquils still bloom long after
The planters are gone

Don't know whether it was intended, but I like the wordplay with "planters."

+1

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on April 01, 2020, 05:34:18 AM
I have, for the duration, relocated to be nearer by mother.  My abode is on a coastal island with far too many deer who are accustomed to bipeds and handouts.  When I walk onto the porch, said deer will look up expectantly, undeterred by the madly barking dog next to me.  If I see bipeds feeding deer, I explain (from 6 feet away) that it's unhealthy...yaddayaddayadda.  However, it's when I mention ticks that the bipeds take note and move back.    Deer health unimportant.....
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: statsgeek on April 02, 2020, 06:59:51 AM
StatSpouse and I spent a significant amount of time yesterday watching the squirrel vs. bird feeder drama unfolding in our yard.  The best part is, we didn't intentionally squirrel-proof this one.  (We usually just accept that they can have some, too.) 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on April 07, 2020, 11:47:39 AM
A rather large hawk just landed on my front porch railing, looked around, saw me through the window, and took off again.

Now I know why there was a quick uptick in noise from the other birds, just prior. The whole thing was a nice break from work.





Okay, signing off and getting back to it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on April 07, 2020, 04:46:16 PM
I saved a squirrel's life today!
I had to go out (I know...)  to get syringes for my allergy shots. 
On the way home I slowed down because a squirrel was running down the street heading for a tree.  Off to the right running right at him was a cat!  The cat was startled to see my car and broke off the chase, otherwise im sure it would be Kitty 1, Squirrel  supper!!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on April 08, 2020, 05:21:42 AM
Turtle rescue question:  I am in a place where I can safely ride my bicycle.   Twice within a week, a turtle (not the same turtle) was heading toward the sidewalk and the road.  Both times, I moved the turtle to the other side of the road....the directions in which each one was headed.  A body of water is on the other side of the road.

When I am able to do so safely, I rescue turtles who are crossing a road/highway, but these hadn't yet reached the road.

Did I do the right thing?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 08, 2020, 05:32:29 AM
Yes. I've done the same in a couple of cases.

I think turtles, like turkeys, have a kind of one-track mind about where they are going and don't realize how fast other things (like cars) move.

Much kinder to prevent them becoming turtle soup.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 08, 2020, 07:01:09 AM
I've rescued turtles in the road whenever possible as well.  When I was younger I accidentally drove over a couple of them (Once, while driving a large, unfamiliar car with the window down, I tried to miss a turtle and steered right into it instead.  I've never forgotten that sickening crunch....).  My turtle rescues ever since have been an effort to atone for those accidents.  I've long since lost count, but I know I'm out ahead now on rescues.

Several years ago I encountered what looked remarkably like a turtle migration.  I found them around almost every bend on a winding road.  There was nowhere to pull over to try moving any of them out of harm's way.  I had all I could do just to miss all of them.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on April 08, 2020, 07:43:51 AM
Turtle rescue question:  I am in a place where I can safely ride my bicycle.   Twice within a week, a turtle (not the same turtle) was heading toward the sidewalk and the road.  Both times, I moved the turtle to the other side of the road....the directions in which each one was headed.  A body of water is on the other side of the road.

When I am able to do so safely, I rescue turtles who are crossing a road/highway, but these hadn't yet reached the road.

Did I do the right thing?

Yes.  If you moved them along their path, good work. 

Unless it was a snapping turtle, then, count our fingers.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 08, 2020, 01:24:03 PM
A rather large hawk just landed on my front porch railing, looked around, saw me through the window, and took off again.

Now I know why there was a quick uptick in noise from the other birds, just prior. The whole thing was a nice break from work.





Okay, signing off and getting back to it.

Join us on the bird thread!

We are becoming hawk experts.

You can add your knowledge.

;--}

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 08, 2020, 09:57:28 PM
A rather large hawk just landed on my front porch railing, looked around, saw me through the window, and took off again.

Now I know why there was a quick uptick in noise from the other birds, just prior. The whole thing was a nice break from work.





Okay, signing off and getting back to it.

Join us on the bird thread!

We are becoming hawk experts.

You can add your knowledge.

;--}

M.

Yes. Join us. Reminds me of a movie...

So, what kind of hawk was it?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on April 09, 2020, 05:00:03 AM
Caterpillars.

I hate them.

They are eating my spinach.

I've tried soapsuds sprayed on them, and they laughingly blow bubbles at me. I am apparently not cut out for farming, as I've managed to lose an entire container garden INSIDE A SCREENED ENCLOSURE. Help?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on April 09, 2020, 06:06:27 AM
Caterpillars.

I hate them.

They are eating my spinach.

I've tried soapsuds sprayed on them, and they laughingly blow bubbles at me. I am apparently not cut out for farming, as I've managed to lose an entire container garden INSIDE A SCREENED ENCLOSURE. Help?

LOL because that's me!!!  Fortunately, I have kinfolk who have large gardens and take pity on me.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 09, 2020, 11:57:10 AM
Caterpillars.

I hate them.

They are eating my spinach.

I've tried soapsuds sprayed on them, and they laughingly blow bubbles at me. I am apparently not cut out for farming, as I've managed to lose an entire container garden INSIDE A SCREENED ENCLOSURE. Help?

Do you know what kind they are? Have you tried insecticidal soap? Some people swear by diluted tobbaco juice.

Edit: Are they large enough to pick off and dispose of? What about neem oil?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on April 09, 2020, 12:48:37 PM
I've been picking them off - they are about an inch long and look sort of like the ones that eat my tomatoes (I have successfully grown tomatoes SO THERE, gardening gods!). But my salads are still disappearing (I planted kale and spinach and apparently the kale is a bit better- the caterpillars apparently feel about kale like my 20 year old son does - they'll eat it if nothing else is around, but the lettuce and spinach go first.

What is neem oil and where can I get it? I heard that about tobacco but we are a tobacco free house...hmmm..

I may try what my sister suggested - dawn dish soap mixed with cayenne pepper and sprayed on them. We shall see. I may try a decoy pot of spinach to lure the caterpillars and some kale for consumption. I also ordered some marigold seeds; we will see if that really works.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 09, 2020, 05:06:11 PM
I've been picking them off - they are about an inch long and look sort of like the ones that eat my tomatoes (I have successfully grown tomatoes SO THERE, gardening gods!). But my salads are still disappearing (I planted kale and spinach and apparently the kale is a bit better- the caterpillars apparently feel about kale like my 20 year old son does - they'll eat it if nothing else is around, but the lettuce and spinach go first.

What is neem oil and where can I get it? I heard that about tobacco but we are a tobacco free house...hmmm..

I may try what my sister suggested - dawn dish soap mixed with cayenne pepper and sprayed on them. We shall see. I may try a decoy pot of spinach to lure the caterpillars and some kale for consumption. I also ordered some marigold seeds; we will see if that really works.

I've also heard of using a hot pepper and soap solution. Do you think they are cabbage loopers? You can buy neem oil off Amazon, or any 'big box' store. It is the oil extracted from the neem tree.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on April 09, 2020, 06:12:31 PM
I've been picking them off - they are about an inch long and look sort of like the ones that eat my tomatoes (I have successfully grown tomatoes SO THERE, gardening gods!). But my salads are still disappearing (I planted kale and spinach and apparently the kale is a bit better- the caterpillars apparently feel about kale like my 20 year old son does - they'll eat it if nothing else is around, but the lettuce and spinach go first.

What is neem oil and where can I get it? I heard that about tobacco but we are a tobacco free house...hmmm..

I may try what my sister suggested - dawn dish soap mixed with cayenne pepper and sprayed on them. We shall see. I may try a decoy pot of spinach to lure the caterpillars and some kale for consumption. I also ordered some marigold seeds; we will see if that really works.

I've also heard of using a hot pepper and soap solution. Do you think they are cabbage loopers? You can buy neem oil off Amazon, or any 'big box' store. It is the oil extracted from the neem tree.

Eewww, I just looked those up. They look like those, but darker. I think they are fall armyworms, only really dark ones because they're feeding on spinach. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_armyworm
It sounds like their behavior, too; horrid things.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: waterboy on April 10, 2020, 06:22:42 AM
We had 4 deer stroll by the dining room window at noon the other day. These are supposed to be dawn/dusk animals. It finally prompted me to get that trail camera to see what else wanders by.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 10, 2020, 07:26:30 AM
We had 4 deer stroll by the dining room window at noon the other day. These are supposed to be dawn/dusk animals. It finally prompted me to get that trail camera to see what else wanders by.

My parents' neighbor, the hermit who lives on their land, has a camera that records the wildlife.  He occasionally shows them pictures of the highlights.  They've seen deer, hogs, turkeys, a bobcat, what might have been a bear, a huge tarantula, etc., all in the woods just a few minutes' walk from the house. 

They also saw, on one occasion, saw a guy in camouflage and carrying a rifle who wasn't supposed to be there.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on April 10, 2020, 09:54:43 AM
eek.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: downer on April 10, 2020, 03:09:17 PM
I have a yard with grass. I have in the past used a lawn service. I have seen some lawn services working but I'm pretty sure that it is not really an essential service. I also like the idea of a wild yard that does not require a lawn service.

So maybe this is the time for me to convert my yard from grass to something else.

Does anyone have any experience of this?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on April 10, 2020, 03:40:16 PM
Does anyone have any experience of this?
Yes, though mostly inadvertent.  ;)

What region, or what kind of climate do you live in?  And what kind of neighborhood / area do you live in, and are there restrictions on what your yard can look like?  These will help determine your best options.

There are some "no-mow lawn" mixes that use low-growing grasses and sedges for a lawn-replacement look; there are xeriscaping plans for places that get little rainfall; if you have space and climate and interest you can grow a wildflower meadow or a vegetable garden, etc.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on April 10, 2020, 04:04:01 PM
"maintenance" is often a necessary function, and it could be argued that lawn care is maintenance.

Your community may not agree, though.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 10, 2020, 04:08:48 PM
Quote
...xeriscaping plans for places that get little rainfall;

I had to look this up.

I was also thinking, "I've seen some cool gardens with colored stones and glass pebbles and cacti and stuff...."

...and lo and behold, there's a name for it!

There's also a lovely prayer garden here:

   https://www.mfa.org/collections/featured-galleries/japanese-garden-tenshin-en

If you were to create something like that with a traditional arrangement by a skilled landscaper, the occasional raking with a wooden pegged rake might be quite contemplative, as opposed to the noisy, gassy-smelling lawnmowers most people are owned by.

M. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Blackadder on April 10, 2020, 05:43:05 PM
Coyote howling at night near our condo is creepy. No dogs and we are on the second floor but I still get chills when I hear it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: downer on April 10, 2020, 06:04:35 PM
Does anyone have any experience of this?
Yes, though mostly inadvertent.  ;)

What region, or what kind of climate do you live in?  And what kind of neighborhood / area do you live in, and are there restrictions on what your yard can look like?  These will help determine your best options.

There are some "no-mow lawn" mixes that use low-growing grasses and sedges for a lawn-replacement look; there are xeriscaping plans for places that get little rainfall; if you have space and climate and interest you can grow a wildflower meadow or a vegetable garden, etc.

Thanks.

I'm in the north east US. Hardiness Zone 7.

There are definitely rules about overgrown lawns in my area. I'm not sure if that is just for what is visible from the street or whether it also applies to back yards too.

I have about half an acre, so I can't fill that with a veg garden. I am planning on a small garden.

I'm hoping to make this low cost -- or at least no more than it costs to pay my landscaper for a summer.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 10, 2020, 06:10:15 PM
Make a .moss-and rock garden in several areas.

Fill in with grass where you must.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 10, 2020, 07:08:30 PM
Make a .moss-and rock garden in several areas.

Fill in with grass where you must.

M.

Moss lawns are stunning! If you have a lot of shade, then it should work well for you. That actually gives me an idea on what to do with a path I have. It's loose river rock and has tons of weeds in it. Flagstone with moss in between sounds nice.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on April 11, 2020, 04:59:16 AM
I have a yard with grass. I have in the past used a lawn service. I have seen some lawn services working but I'm pretty sure that it is not really an essential service. I also like the idea of a wild yard that does not require a lawn service.

So maybe this is the time for me to convert my yard from grass to something else.

Does anyone have any experience of this?

Actually, yes, although not in your climate. When I lived beachside in Florida I xeriscaped our yard because it was too much hassle to grow grass. I did it gradually over a period of about 10 years (we lived there for a fair amount of time till hurricanes in 2008 drove us inland). I made rock borders, tore up the grass within them, and planted native plants in those areas (I laid gardening cloth first, but it was mostly useless against the weeds although I did use rocks on top). It was a constant battle for a long time to distinguish weeds from "native plants" until the plants got established and big enough, but after then it looked more "on purpose" than "this person is just a lazy gardener"

Our property now is kind of that way as well - we have woods that we brush hog about once a year to fix the fence, but otherwise it's kind of overgrown, but that's more inadvertent.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on April 21, 2020, 04:55:54 PM
Well, I just had my first rattlesnake sighting out here.  We were sitting on the back patio, when spouse said WTF is that! It was a rattlesnake (surprise!), right by the patio.  I hadn't even noticed it! He shot at it a few times with an air rifle and the thing did not even flinch at the very close misses.  He did manage to wing it, and it slithered off to the other side of the patio.  He then tried to smack it with a shovel as it made its way into the rosemary, but it started rattling and this is not the time for hospital visits.  Ack, it's gone now and will likely be back.  I periodically go through paranoia-driven checks of the patio, under the furniture, etc. when it gets warmer, but now I don't even want to go out there.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on April 21, 2020, 05:00:45 PM
Cats brought in two (live and undamaged) alligator lizards.

Yesterday we sighted a few sea lions, a pile of seals, and a river otter.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 22, 2020, 07:55:18 AM
One of our cats has discovered the five-lined skinks who sun themselves on the outside window sills. She is entertained for hours- just watching them from inside, which is good for us, since she gets into so much trouble.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on April 22, 2020, 08:09:16 AM
Well, I just had my first rattlesnake sighting out here.  We were sitting on the back patio, when spouse said WTF is that! It was a rattlesnake (surprise!), right by the patio.  I hadn't even noticed it! He shot at it a few times with an air rifle and the thing did not even flinch at the very close misses.  He did manage to wing it, and it slithered off to the other side of the patio.  He then tried to smack it with a shovel as it made its way into the rosemary, but it started rattling and this is not the time for hospital visits.  Ack, it's gone now and will likely be back.  I periodically go through paranoia-driven checks of the patio, under the furniture, etc. when it gets warmer, but now I don't even want to go out there.

Just walk slowly and listen for the buzz - they don't want to get stepped on, so they'll warn you if you get close.
<ducks and runs away, fast!>
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: AmLitHist on May 05, 2020, 06:42:22 AM
A young doe ran across the interstate about 60 yards ahead of me early Saturday morning.  Traffic was light, but flashed my lights for oncoming cars. I slowed down and watched in my mirror to make sure she made it across all the lanes safely, and I saw her go into the woods on the far side of the road.

(We've had about 5" of rain in the past 10 days, so the creeks and bottoms are really high now.)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 05, 2020, 07:32:02 AM
In the last couple of weeks I've found a remarkable number of squirrels flattened in the streets of my neighborhood.  Since the traffic has been less in the same weeks, I don't know why that would be.  The city has been cleaning up the remains fairly promptly, except for one mummified example.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on May 05, 2020, 08:13:11 AM
Yeek!  A mouse just ran across my floor and the cat was too lazy to chase it.  Time to bring out the peppermint oil and cotton balls.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 05, 2020, 11:58:31 AM
Yeek!  A mouse just ran across my floor and the cat was too lazy to chase it.  Time to bring out the peppermint oil and cotton balls.

Or you could do what my brother did when we were kids.  He shot a mouse in the kitchen with a pellet gun.  It did the job.  He wasn't encouraged to do it again, though.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on May 05, 2020, 02:10:59 PM
Yeah, I accidentally killed the mouse. I shoved a heavy box against the wall not knowing the mouse was behind it.  I feel very bad about that. I usually catch them and release them in the field across the road.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 05, 2020, 02:31:55 PM
It has been skink season over here. We have the five-lined skink and the broad-headded skink in this region and they have been known to sneak into the house when they're not sunning themselves on the sidewalk.

I actually caught one today, so the cat wouldn't kill it, and it bit me. Not surprised. I've been bitten before, doesn't really hurt, but it is surprising.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on May 05, 2020, 02:46:24 PM
T'other day, the sea lions were hunting herring. It was wonderful to watch.

I guess it's lizard season, because the cats are bringing 2-3 alligator lizards in every day now. They don't seem to harm them at all; they just grab them and bring them home to show us. The lizards appear entirely unharmed, apart from the occasional dropped tail. The red cat doesn't like it when they drop their tails, so he's perfected a technique for bringing in whole lizards: he stuff them into his mouth face-first, tail dangling out.

As far as I can tell, the lizards don't even have any puncture marks from the cats' teeth. Weird kitlets.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 05, 2020, 09:26:58 PM
T'other day, the sea lions were hunting herring. It was wonderful to watch.

I guess it's lizard season, because the cats are bringing 2-3 alligator lizards in every day now. They don't seem to harm them at all; they just grab them and bring them home to show us. The lizards appear entirely unharmed, apart from the occasional dropped tail. The red cat doesn't like it when they drop their tails, so he's perfected a technique for bringing in whole lizards: he stuff them into his mouth face-first, tail dangling out.

As far as I can tell, the lizards don't even have any puncture marks from the cats' teeth. Weird kitlets.

Our kitties haven't gotten to that point and if they do- I don't trust them. One of them almost ate a cicada!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on May 06, 2020, 07:03:26 AM
Our kitties haven't gotten to that point and if they do- I don't trust them. One of them almost ate a cicada!

Cicadas are apparently quite edible (for people too), and described as tasting like shrimp. As a vegetarian I won't partake, but would not begrudge the cats the opportunity to snack.

Question-- anyone have experience harness and leash training cats? I just got them for my two yearlings, who are very interested in the outside through screened windows but have never been outside for real. I'm not imagining walking down the street with them, just taking them in the backyard. I'm planning to start training indoors with treats. Any tips welcome!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on May 06, 2020, 07:58:45 AM
Our kitties haven't gotten to that point and if they do- I don't trust them. One of them almost ate a cicada!

Cicadas are apparently quite edible (for people too), and described as tasting like shrimp. As a vegetarian I won't partake, but would not begrudge the cats the opportunity to snack.

Question-- anyone have experience harness and leash training cats? I just got them for my two yearlings, who are very interested in the outside through screened windows but have never been outside for real. I'm not imagining walking down the street with them, just taking them in the backyard. I'm planning to start training indoors with treats. Any tips welcome!

Late great cat absolutely loved cicadas!  During summer he would sit outside in the evening waiting for them to emerge from the ground and munch them before they could even molt.

Puget, my limited experience with trying to harness-train a cat had typical results - cat froze, stared at me in horror, bunny hopped a bit, then fell over sideways and stayed there until I got bored and removed the harness.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on May 06, 2020, 08:11:06 AM
Our kitties haven't gotten to that point and if they do- I don't trust them. One of them almost ate a cicada!

Cicadas are apparently quite edible (for people too), and described as tasting like shrimp. As a vegetarian I won't partake, but would not begrudge the cats the opportunity to snack.

Question-- anyone have experience harness and leash training cats? I just got them for my two yearlings, who are very interested in the outside through screened windows but have never been outside for real. I'm not imagining walking down the street with them, just taking them in the backyard. I'm planning to start training indoors with treats. Any tips welcome!

Late great cat absolutely loved cicadas!  During summer he would sit outside in the evening waiting for them to emerge from the ground and munch them before they could even molt.

Puget, my limited experience with trying to harness-train a cat had typical results - cat froze, stared at me in horror, bunny hopped a bit, then fell over sideways and stayed there until I got bored and removed the harness.

Yup. Same experience here.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on May 06, 2020, 08:36:42 AM
LOL, yes, actually I do have some experience, if only secondhand. My daughter worked for the animals shelter for quite some time that was dedicated to providing exceptional training opportunities for staff, and we have a cat (a very young one at the time) so she decided to practice on the cat. She used clicker training to teach her to sit, to jump up on things to get her food, etc. And finally, she taught her to walk on a leash so she could go outside. She loved it, and basically dragged us around the yard for as long as we'd tolerate it. We didn't get her to the point where she was truly leash-trained; you kind of went where she led (she is a CAT, after all, and not a dog, and her personality is different) but you could guide her where you wanted if you were patient and used clicks and rewards, and she got to where she was quite responsive.

I've known some cats who were braver than her (she's a timid personality) who would walk down the road, but we never attempted it with her, because she's a nervous cat, and would try to bolt if she were chased by a dog or such.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on May 06, 2020, 12:08:32 PM
She used clicker training to teach her to sit, to jump up on things to get her food, etc. And finally, she taught her to walk on a leash so she could go outside. She loved it, and basically dragged us around the yard for as long as we'd tolerate it. We didn't get her to the point where she was truly leash-trained; you kind of went where she led (she is a CAT, after all, and not a dog, and her personality is different) but you could guide her where you wanted if you were patient and used clicks and rewards, and she got to where she was quite responsive.


We did the exact same thing with our red cat. He tolerates the vest and leash (it took some trial and error to find a vest he was comfortable with), and does pretty OK with it all, especially when goaded with treats. He slinks around a little weird with the vest on, but he doesn't mind it much.

He's a total outdoor cat, however, so he doesn't get the vest and leash treatment often; mostly when he's been confined indoors for a while due to illness.

He knows, like, twentyish tricks, however!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 06, 2020, 12:25:05 PM
Our kitties haven't gotten to that point and if they do- I don't trust them. One of them almost ate a cicada!

Cicadas are apparently quite edible (for people too), and described as tasting like shrimp. As a vegetarian I won't partake, but would not begrudge the cats the opportunity to snack.

Some dogs too.  I know of a Chihuahua that used to crunch down the occasional cicada during cicada season.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on May 06, 2020, 01:28:18 PM
The 13/17 year cicadas come out together in part as a survival mechanism.  They taste good to those critters that eat them, so one way to deal with that is to all come out together and let the predators eat so many that they become satiated .  Let them eat so many that they never want to eat another one again!

(In graduate school, I cooked a turkey every term, cut it into packages and ate turkey several times a week.  I have been out of graduate school for 20 years now, and I no longer even like the smell of a turkey cooking!  I am more than happy to eat it for Thanksgiving, and not again for the rest of the year!  I think that the same applies to cicadas.  Let them eat all they want,so that the later emergents  wont be bothered.   
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 06, 2020, 03:31:01 PM
Our kitties haven't gotten to that point and if they do- I don't trust them. One of them almost ate a cicada!

Cicadas are apparently quite edible (for people too), and described as tasting like shrimp. As a vegetarian I won't partake, but would not begrudge the cats the opportunity to snack.

Question-- anyone have experience harness and leash training cats? I just got them for my two yearlings, who are very interested in the outside through screened windows but have never been outside for real. I'm not imagining walking down the street with them, just taking them in the backyard. I'm planning to start training indoors with treats. Any tips welcome!

My suggestion is to start them young! We started evil cat when she was probably two months old. She doesn't go on full fledged walks, like most canines, but she has no problem being on a harness and being outside. She'll even want to walk around (inside) the house on it!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 06, 2020, 03:33:26 PM
LOL, yes, actually I do have some experience, if only secondhand. My daughter worked for the animals shelter for quite some time that was dedicated to providing exceptional training opportunities for staff, and we have a cat (a very young one at the time) so she decided to practice on the cat. She used clicker training to teach her to sit, to jump up on things to get her food, etc. And finally, she taught her to walk on a leash so she could go outside. She loved it, and basically dragged us around the yard for as long as we'd tolerate it. We didn't get her to the point where she was truly leash-trained; you kind of went where she led (she is a CAT, after all, and not a dog, and her personality is different) but you could guide her where you wanted if you were patient and used clicks and rewards, and she got to where she was quite responsive.

I've known some cats who were braver than her (she's a timid personality) who would walk down the road, but we never attempted it with her, because she's a nervous cat, and would try to bolt if she were chased by a dog or such.
Evil cat is somewhat of a scaredy-cat, the oddest things set her off. She will lead us on the leash/harness combo and can pull me around a bit.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on May 06, 2020, 05:03:18 PM
LOL, yes, actually I do have some experience, if only secondhand. My daughter worked for the animals shelter for quite some time that was dedicated to providing exceptional training opportunities for staff, and we have a cat (a very young one at the time) so she decided to practice on the cat. She used clicker training to teach her to sit, to jump up on things to get her food, etc. And finally, she taught her to walk on a leash so she could go outside. She loved it, and basically dragged us around the yard for as long as we'd tolerate it. We didn't get her to the point where she was truly leash-trained; you kind of went where she led (she is a CAT, after all, and not a dog, and her personality is different) but you could guide her where you wanted if you were patient and used clicks and rewards, and she got to where she was quite responsive.

I've known some cats who were braver than her (she's a timid personality) who would walk down the road, but we never attempted it with her, because she's a nervous cat, and would try to bolt if she were chased by a dog or such.
Evil cat is somewhat of a scaredy-cat, the oddest things set her off. She will lead us on the leash/harness combo and can pull me around a bit.

Thanks for all the comments-- I guess I should have posted on the herding cats threat so as not to derail this one, though I suppose "fauna and other natural things" includes cats. . . Our first indoor habituation session this evening went better than expected. There was some flopping and attempts at escape at first, but I immediately gave them catnip and lots of attention and they adjusted pretty rapidly. Little calico girl played with the wand toy and even went to get a snack after awhile, and her brother the big panther boy climbed the play structure for more catnip. We'll see what reserving catnip for only harness on time will buy us.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on May 06, 2020, 06:11:44 PM
LOL, yes, actually I do have some experience, if only secondhand. My daughter worked for the animals shelter for quite some time that was dedicated to providing exceptional training opportunities for staff, and we have a cat (a very young one at the time) so she decided to practice on the cat. She used clicker training to teach her to sit, to jump up on things to get her food, etc. And finally, she taught her to walk on a leash so she could go outside. She loved it, and basically dragged us around the yard for as long as we'd tolerate it. We didn't get her to the point where she was truly leash-trained; you kind of went where she led (she is a CAT, after all, and not a dog, and her personality is different) but you could guide her where you wanted if you were patient and used clicks and rewards, and she got to where she was quite responsive.

I've known some cats who were braver than her (she's a timid personality) who would walk down the road, but we never attempted it with her, because she's a nervous cat, and would try to bolt if she were chased by a dog or such.
Evil cat is somewhat of a scaredy-cat, the oddest things set her off. She will lead us on the leash/harness combo and can pull me around a bit.

Thanks for all the comments-- I guess I should have posted on the herding cats threat so as not to derail this one, though I suppose "fauna and other natural things" includes cats. . . Our first indoor habituation session this evening went better than expected. There was some flopping and attempts at escape at first, but I immediately gave them catnip and lots of attention and they adjusted pretty rapidly. Little calico girl played with the wand toy and even went to get a snack after awhile, and her brother the big panther boy climbed the play structure for more catnip. We'll see what reserving catnip for only harness on time will buy us.

Or give her catnip and chicken, when she calms down. Calm, even for a moment? Here's a piece of chicken. It works pretty well for most animals (including me!)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on May 08, 2020, 12:55:01 PM
Oh! Oh! The flying ants are swarming today!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on May 08, 2020, 07:15:28 PM
Oh! Oh! The flying ants are swarming today!

As long as it's not the flying monkeys ...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on May 11, 2020, 11:09:12 PM
I saw a whale tonight! Pretty close to shore. Minke, I think.

Seals and sea lions and an owl, too. But! A whale!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 12, 2020, 04:54:57 AM
Morning walk: Cottontail, 2 deer, Ducks, Geese, muskrat, woodchuck, Squirrels (grey and Red), chipmunk, Cardinal, Oriole.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on May 12, 2020, 07:38:21 AM
I saw a cottontail this morning, too.  It hopped away at a reasonable speed after I made the cat put it down...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 12, 2020, 10:10:46 AM
Yikes!  Did it Scream?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on May 12, 2020, 06:26:47 PM
Saw 6 squirrels enjoying breakfast from the bird feeder in the front yard at a neighbor's house. I've never seen so many squirrels at one time like that!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 13, 2020, 02:42:44 AM
Watched (safely from a 3rd floor window) a striped skunk digging for grubs in my (newly planted) lawn at midnight.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on May 13, 2020, 08:03:21 AM
Watched (safely from a 3rd floor window) a striped skunk digging for grubs in my (newly planted) lawn at midnight.

"The skunk grubs at midnight..." sounds like code for something, but I'm not sure what.  :)

Our chipmunks have been very active lately. 

The barred owlets on the Cornell/Wild Birds Unlimited webcam [nest box interior view (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/barred-owls/) | exterior view (https://www.youtube.com/embed/wNNTrW3sTmU?rel=0&autoplay=0)] are close to fledging.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 13, 2020, 06:14:24 PM
Sounds like a song I remember...have to tinker with the scansion a bit...

It on'-ly comes out at mid-night'
It's a striped and ruffly sight,
And it can do what few can do
If it doesn't want you--right!

Grubs on the platter....
it's a beautiful thing,
but the scents it brings
Can smart....

Ohh-hh, here it comes,
Watch out, now, its tail is u--u-p
Ohh-hh, here it comes,
It's the grub-eater..."


Well, anyway....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 13, 2020, 10:01:21 PM
That was awesome, Mamselle.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 14, 2020, 05:21:44 AM
Aw, thanks <<blushes>>...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 14, 2020, 07:24:40 AM
That was awesome, Mamselle.

Potential Posting Hall of Fame material, except you'd have to include context!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 14, 2020, 12:40:03 PM
Sounds like a song I remember...have to tinker with the scansion a bit...

It on'-ly comes out at mid-night'
It's a striped and ruffly sight,
And it can do what few can do
If it doesn't want you--right!

Grubs on the platter....
it's a beautiful thing,
but the scents it brings
Can smart....

Ohh-hh, here it comes,
Watch out, now, its tail is u--u-p
Ohh-hh, here it comes,
It's the grub-eater..."


Well, anyway....

M.

Oh I wouldn't if I were you,
I know what it can do,
It'll blind your eyes,
with way worse than a fa-a-art,

She's a grub-eater...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 14, 2020, 05:39:25 PM
Great!!!!

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on May 15, 2020, 02:00:36 PM
Fox Squirrels

https://www.outdooralabama.com/rodents/fox-squirrel

I was discussing squirrels with my friend in Canada and I mentioned that Fox Squirrels can weigh up to 2 pounds.  He had never seen one
I have only seen them a few times. I know I saw some in Florida when I had a hunting lease.

I think that I saw one when I lived in SC.

What about you?  Do you have them in your neighborhood (however broadly we define that?)

The link I posted is the markings I am familiar with.  Are the colors different where you are?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on May 15, 2020, 02:16:04 PM
No fox squirrels here in central Ontario, but one odd looking fox runs down the lane every day around 6 PM--his tail is either bare of fur or wet with something. And he is big and skinny.

Also 3 maybe 4 beavers are swimming around the mouth of the creek next to my house. One year they cleared all the fallen branches from my lawn.  I'm kind of hoping to see them do that again, unless they use the branches to dam the culvert.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 15, 2020, 02:34:37 PM
I caught another blue-tailed skink to keep it away from Evil cat again. I wonder if it's the same skink? It also bit me.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 15, 2020, 02:35:17 PM
I never saw fox squirrels until I moved to my current town.  I've seen them a number of times here, mainly in the city park. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on May 15, 2020, 03:21:32 PM
I caught another blue-tailed skink to keep it away from Evil cat again. I wonder if it's the same skink? It also bit me.
Such ingrates!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 15, 2020, 04:22:29 PM
I caught another blue-tailed skink to keep it away from Evil cat again. I wonder if it's the same skink? It also bit me.
Such ingrates!

It doesn't really hurt. I'm sure I scared the absolute bejeezus out of it and that's why it bit me. Rather it bite me than have the cat eat it.

Interestingly enough, I also saw an adult skink foraging for bugs yesterday. Their movements are so jerky- reminds me of an old stop-motion film.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: spork on May 17, 2020, 02:30:49 PM
My backyard is being invaded by ISIS terrorist bunnies. Yesterday evening three of them arrived in a pack while I was standing on the back porch. I chased them all under the fence. Not ten minutes later a fourth wandered in and went straight to an ornamental plant. I chased that one in a circle around the yard, up my driveway, and across the neighbor's front lawn. My neighbors' houses are too close for me to buy a gun and legally shoot them. Otherwise I think I'd be putting rabbit meat in the freezer.

A pair of mourning doves decided that a wandering jew in a basket hanging on the back porch would make a great place for a nest. I haven't yet decided whether to evict them.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: backatit on May 17, 2020, 03:42:54 PM
Fox Squirrels

https://www.outdooralabama.com/rodents/fox-squirrel

I was discussing squirrels with my friend in Canada and I mentioned that Fox Squirrels can weigh up to 2 pounds.  He had never seen one
I have only seen them a few times. I know I saw some in Florida when I had a hunting lease.

I think that I saw one when I lived in SC.

What about you?  Do you have them in your neighborhood (however broadly we define that?)

The link I posted is the markings I am familiar with.  Are the colors different where you are?

We used to have quite a few of them but they are getting rarer here. A friend who is a wildlife rehabber just got one in that had been hit on the road, so there are still aa few around, but not like there used to be. I love them - they are the big galoots of the squirrel family!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on May 18, 2020, 04:39:33 AM
My backyard is being invaded by ISIS terrorist bunnies. Yesterday evening three of them arrived in a pack while I was standing on the back porch. I chased them all under the fence. Not ten minutes later a fourth wandered in and went straight to an ornamental plant. I chased that one in a circle around the yard, up my driveway, and across the neighbor's front lawn. My neighbors' houses are too close for me to buy a gun and legally shoot them. Otherwise I think I'd be putting rabbit meat in the freezer.

A pair of mourning doves decided that a wandering jew in a basket hanging on the back porch would make a great place for a nest. I haven't yet decided whether to evict them.

On the bright side, you're getting plenty of exercise.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 19, 2020, 07:14:37 AM
Early this morning
I robbed my gardenia bush
The house now smells sweet
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 19, 2020, 10:49:29 AM
Gardenias have such a deep pungent scent.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on May 19, 2020, 11:31:16 AM
Where are the Cicadas this year?

have they started to emerge?

My travel bucket list includes 2 bug tourist spots. I want to see the synchronous fireflies in the smokey mountain national park.
I want to be a travel geek tourist and visit the cicadas of the different broods and follow like a rock star!  (I may need a motor home in my early retirement... IF I can afford a motor home in early retirement!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on May 21, 2020, 05:42:38 AM
Early this morning
I robbed my gardenia bush
The house now smells sweet

We had gardenias just outside the front door when I was growing up.  Scent reminds me of death, though I have no idea why.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 21, 2020, 07:24:05 AM
Right now the gardenia bush is being so generous I even have them in my office.  It's great!

If only Baka-inu next door didn't make such a fuss every time I go over to that end of the yard to gather some blossoms.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 21, 2020, 12:52:28 PM
Out scouting a site for my ornithology class and saw a beaver (a big 'un too!).

And birds.  Lots of birds.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 21, 2020, 01:03:54 PM
Out scouting a site for my ornithology class and saw a beaver (a big 'un too!).

And birds.  Lots of birds.

Hurry up and enjoy those trees, birds, before the beavers gnaw them down.

Seriously, I visited a state park in Tennessee once where the beavers had demolished the timber.  Judging from the size of some of those beaver cuts, the beavers must have been monsters.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on May 21, 2020, 06:28:31 PM
Where are the Cicadas this year?
have they started to emerge?
https://www.cicadamania.com/

This year, look for Brood IX in parts of WV, VA, and NC.
https://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/brood-ix-9-will-emerge-in-2020-in-north-carolina-virginia-and-west-virginia/

Quote from: clean
My travel bucket list includes 2 bug tourist spots. I want to see the synchronous fireflies in the smokey mountain national park.
Me, too.  Also, the oyamel fir forests in Mexico where the monarchs overwinter, before they're gone.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on May 25, 2020, 09:18:30 AM
It was an exciting afternoon in the backyard yesterday.  I saw three separate predators - a cat (not mine - I made sure it saw me and had a good head start before letting the dog out to send it over the fence and encourage it to stay there), a Cooper's hawk, and a half-grown bullfrog (it wasn't in the pond this morning - must not have liked being caught, checked over for large lumps in its stomach, and lectured about it's dining preferences...) - each fail to catch a bird.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 25, 2020, 10:07:00 AM
It was an exciting afternoon in the backyard yesterday.  I saw three separate predators - a cat (not mine - I made sure it saw me and had a good head start before letting the dog out to send it over the fence and encourage it to stay there), a Cooper's hawk, and a half-grown bullfrog (it wasn't in the pond this morning - must not have liked being caught, checked over for large lumps in its stomach, and lectured about it's dining preferences...) - each fail to catch a bird.

I did not know that bullfrogs ate birds.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 26, 2020, 07:25:06 AM
It was an exciting afternoon in the backyard yesterday.  I saw three separate predators - a cat (not mine - I made sure it saw me and had a good head start before letting the dog out to send it over the fence and encourage it to stay there), a Cooper's hawk, and a half-grown bullfrog (it wasn't in the pond this morning - must not have liked being caught, checked over for large lumps in its stomach, and lectured about it's dining preferences...) - each fail to catch a bird.

I did not know that bullfrogs ate birds.

They evidently will eat just about anything that they can swallow.  They've even been known to eat small snakes, baby alligators, and smaller frogs.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 26, 2020, 09:19:28 AM
This brings the complementary picture of Baby Yoda swallowing a frog whole.."Gulp!" (...and looking up pleased, as if having accomplished something)...to mind.

Things do eat the oddest other things.

OK, back to Earth...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 26, 2020, 10:35:14 AM
Walking down the street
I pass a small debris field
A most unlucky squirrel
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on May 26, 2020, 12:34:27 PM
Working at my desk I looked up to see a bumble bee the size of my thumb banging against the outside of my window--maybe a foot from my face. The next time I looked up the same monstrous bee was on the inside of the same window.

I can't figure out how he did that--checked all my screens and doors.  But I caught him in a plastic cup and released him on the other side of the house. I hope he's grateful enough not to enter again.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on May 27, 2020, 02:45:46 PM
I think I just caught a glimpse of a golden eagle flying by the house--just as the smallest cat was bringing home a (live, unharmed) alligator lizard.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 27, 2020, 07:50:07 PM
I think I just caught a glimpse of a golden eagle flying by the house--just as the smallest cat was bringing home a (live, unharmed) alligator lizard.

Wow! as to the bird!

Re: The continued arrival of (living) alligator lizards: it seems as if your pet wants a pet.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on May 31, 2020, 06:16:53 AM
The chipmunk living in the back and side yards has obviously decided that it's safe to play on our front porch during the day, given that we haven't gone outside much during the pandemic lockdown.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 01, 2020, 05:17:02 AM
Dog meets racoon around 4:30 this morning.  I forgot to bring in the bird feeder and the critter was on the porch railing when I let dog out.  Dog had a wonderful time running back and forth, barking madly, and just generally letting the racoon know who was really the boss.  Critter exited gracefully, without a backward glance.  Bird seed gone.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 01, 2020, 07:09:53 AM
 
A raccoon we named "Sneak" is the reason I no longer have bird feeders. I have a photo of his last pillaging, but I can't remember how to upload it to the Fora.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 01, 2020, 08:02:27 AM
Create a Photobucket account in your fora name, then post links to your uploads.

Looking forward to seeing that!

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 01, 2020, 08:47:32 AM

Having trouble getting rid of unwanted info.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 01, 2020, 09:47:21 AM

Having trouble getting rid of unwanted info.

Some things you can make up and they'll take it.

You can also "invent" a new gmail account if they're asking for that.

No-one will know.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on June 01, 2020, 10:29:50 AM
I plan to work in the backyard today. We have a mulberry tree that has made babies (which, unfortunately, need to be removed since it's so crowded back there). I was also toying with the idea of trying to pot them and give them away- but who would want them? I can hardly get any of the berries since the squirrels seem to enjoy eating them. The funny thing about this mulberry tree is that it is what I call a 'bird-poop' plant. I didn't plant the tree, so the only other reason for its existence is that a bird, or squirrel (or other animal), pooped out the seed and it grew.

There are plenty of bushes, shrubs, etc. to prune- lots to weed. The gardenia bushes are blooming, so there is a wonderful scent in the air. Wineberries are starting to produce, though we probably have another 2-3 weeks. Blueberries are also getting ready to ripen.

I need something to relax me, so communing with Nature is it!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 01, 2020, 12:00:25 PM
Get some silk worms....

    That's probably how the tree got there to begin with.

They (or their fecund ancestors) were brought to the US in the 18th-19th c.s to start sericulture programs.

Some worked, some didn't, but the trees stuck around. .

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 04, 2020, 04:27:29 PM

A mink! (I think) just ran by with something in its mouth--too fast for me to see what.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 04, 2020, 04:50:13 PM
A mink
I think
At least
Won't stink.

(with apologies to Ogden Nash.)

m.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on June 05, 2020, 12:15:11 AM
A mink
I think
At least
Won't stink.
(Oh, but they do! :D )
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on June 05, 2020, 06:19:07 AM
Anal glands
in the Carnivora
All stink to some degree
Weasels and skunk are by far worst
But dogs and cats? Also awful,
When they spray - that isn't pee!

And others of the meat-ivorous clan
Seals, Hyaenas, Red pandas too
Also have their glands to share
But in the biggest and baddest
Smell won't typically matter
It's the least thing to fear from a bear!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 05, 2020, 10:23:11 AM
Wrong, I was.

Apologize, I do.

Thy poem, FishProf,

Hast best ring true.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on June 05, 2020, 12:55:54 PM
*blush*
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: polly_mer on June 08, 2020, 02:39:18 PM
Our local emergency management office has activated the local alert system.  They are warning people to stay inside due to bears with no fear of humans wandering our neighborhood.

The claim is Fish and Wildlife is handling the situation.

People have been posting pictures of this bear family for a couple weeks.  I wonder what changed today.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 08, 2020, 02:55:12 PM
Someone decided it was time to activate their right to arm bears?

...Sorry, old joke.

Be safe.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: polly_mer on June 08, 2020, 06:05:29 PM
Someone decided it was time to activate their right to arm bears?

Nah, we're an open carry state and it's pretty common to see any firearm up to a literal machine gun in the back of a truck here in town*.  Just seeing a couple new gun owners wandering around would be unlikely to invoke any worry.

We have such a low number of human-on-human violent crimes in town that the number of animal-on-human violent acts that require hospitalization every year is more worrying from a probability standpoint.

Multiple times per year, the public schools go into lockdown because of bears, mountain lions, and other large predators spotted near the schools.

As Stephen Colbert used to put on his threatdown alert, bears are number one.


* During the specialty days at the range a couple miles from here, multiple people will indeed set up privately-owned machine guns for community use under heavily supervised conditions.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 08, 2020, 06:40:41 PM
One summer I temped for the state Environmental Services Department.

The big thrill on that job was a call from a summer school principle further out of town, who wanted to know what to do about the moose that had wandered into their parking lot.

It was noontime and they usually let the kids out for recess, but he thought maybe he shouldn't do that this time and wanted backup that that was the right decision...in case any parents complained.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: polly_mer on June 08, 2020, 08:52:07 PM
One summer I temped for the state Environmental Services Department.

The big thrill on that job was a call from a summer school principle further out of town, who wanted to know what to do about the moose that had wandered into their parking lot.

It was noontime and they usually let the kids out for recess, but he thought maybe he shouldn't do that this time and wanted backup that that was the right decision...in case any parents complained.

M.

So what did you tell him?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 08, 2020, 09:13:54 PM
I forwarded the call to my supervisor.

You learn triage in jobs like that....

;--}

Actually, I think they sent up a couple of Environmental Protection Officers up to check it out, but I heard later that the moose had wandered back into the woods before they got there....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on June 13, 2020, 07:59:18 AM
I found a worm snake in the garden yesterday!  I knew that I should have them and am still thrilled to have finally found one - it was also thrilled, once I let it go....
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on June 13, 2020, 11:17:09 AM
I wish I could be excited about the wildlife we have.  The only kind I would like to get up close to would be the cats, but they never come near us, except for the one that flung itself through the air at us the one time.  It rained last night, and as we sat on the patio something looked awry to me over in the corner.  I asked my husband if it was a leaf or a frog.  I would have preferred a leaf.  I know, probably most of you would have preferred the frog! We let it sit there out of the rain, but I kept an eye on it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on June 13, 2020, 01:02:08 PM
We've had twin spotted fawns hunkering under the pine tree in the middle of our yard twice in the past few days.  They're adorable.

Note to self: be more vigilant about checking for ticks.  Lyme Disease wasn't too terrible the first time (thankfully), but no need for a repeat performance or a run-in with any of the other tick-borne diseases around here.



Thursday's Child: how cool about the worm snake!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 14, 2020, 05:15:21 AM
We've had twin spotted fawns hunkering under the pine tree in the middle of our yard twice in the past few days.  They're adorable.

Note to self: be more vigilant about checking for ticks.  Lyme Disease wasn't too terrible the first time (thankfully), but no need for a repeat performance or a run-in with any of the other tick-borne diseases around here.



Thursday's Child: how cool about the worm snake!

I sorta rescued a terrified fawn who was trying to cross a road with cars coming from both directions.  Poor little thing finally got far enough across that I could position my car to block him from going back and keep him heading into the nearby woods.  Really shook me up.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 14, 2020, 07:40:49 AM
Oh well done!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: polly_mer on June 14, 2020, 09:07:49 PM
The bear family has been reported as being relocated out of our neighborhood.

The summer bear cams around town are still active for the entertainment of all.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 15, 2020, 08:01:30 AM
While walking this morning I found two squirrels aplastado in the streets from the weekend (I think that second set of remains was a squirrel...).  That's one more than I've been seeing in recent weeks.  I've never seen so many road-killed squirrels.  I very nearly hit one on my bicycle a day or two ago.  They're either more numerous, more reckless, or just more unlucky than usual.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 16, 2020, 07:12:36 AM
And I saw another poor squirrel in the street this morning.  Yesterday I came within a hairbreadth of running over another one on my bicycle.  On my morning walk I saw the squirrels very active.  I think they've gone as mad as March hares in June.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 16, 2020, 07:29:39 AM
Sadly I also saw more run over squirrels this AM on my way into town.  I think there are two reasons, maybe three:

-it's late spring and some of the victims were very young and probably don't know road safety

-the squirrel population got used to fewer cars, and now people are out and about more

-people are driving faster and less carefully because the roads are still relatively empty.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 17, 2020, 08:01:25 AM
The side of the creek in my front yard has produced a mass of pink wildflowers that I've never seen before.  I tried looking them up via Google and they are either something called "pasture roses" or "hairy herb willow".  Whichever, they are lovely and a gift.

Meanwhile three, maybe four mink have visited. Two sat at my French doors in the back, and one of them actually pawed the door. This of course aroused my cat who tried to chase the mink along the picture windows the length of the house.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 18, 2020, 07:48:08 AM
Mink must be fascinating to watch.  I don't believe I've ever observed any mustelids in the wild.  Except for skunks, which I'd rather not encounter.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on June 18, 2020, 08:31:12 AM
A rat snake slithered across our driveway.  We wished it happy hunting and parted company.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 18, 2020, 10:04:16 AM
Mink must be fascinating to watch.  I don't believe I've ever observed any mustelids in the wild.  Except for skunks, which I'd rather not encounter.

Apart from the two pauses (pawses?) on my doorstep, the mink always seem to  be running somewhere. I tried putting some chicken out on the lawn to get them to slow down, but it disappeared when I wasn't looking.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on June 22, 2020, 08:40:14 AM
A massive earthquake swarm in progress just N. of Iceland:  https://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes

They're also watching increased activity two volcanoes...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on June 22, 2020, 08:50:44 AM
Neat, T_C!  Thanks for the link.

And hooray, catherder, on your mink visitors!


Our watering-can frog was back yesterday, after a winter hiatus!  I gasped with delightful surprise when I saw it.  Froggy's gone today after a rain, but the twin fawns are back, and napping under the blue false indigo bush.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on June 22, 2020, 09:50:13 AM
We saw a bunny in the back yard about an hour ago!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 26, 2020, 04:56:28 AM
Skunk...smelled but not seen, thank goodness.  I sleep with my windows open and a fan in the window, which opens onto porch.  Quite malodorous between 4 am and 6ish, when canine went out.  I was quite cautious when we ventured onto the porch and into the yard.  And I did turn the fan off around 5....really, really stinky!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 26, 2020, 07:00:15 AM
No fauna out today during my morning walk in between monsoons.  Except a poor deceased frog lying in the street.  We're getting such a drenching this morning that I suspect this evening's rodeo is going to be largely a washout, even if the rain stops by noon.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on June 26, 2020, 06:59:57 PM
During my daily walks, I've seen deer wandering through people's yards or venturing out of woody areas.  Lots of rabbits lately.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 29, 2020, 09:07:33 AM
I've seen a couple of rabbits lately as well.  I saw one silflaying beside the street a few blocks from the house this morning.

Yesterday morning while out bicycling on the edge of town I saw a deer bounding over a fallen log and into the woods.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 29, 2020, 10:06:21 AM
I had to look up "silflaying," I'd forgotten what it means.

I was thinking of what squirrels and dogs do to cool their tummies off in the heat, when they sprawl with all fours splayed about, panting.

I don't think there's a Lapine term for that, though, since I don't think rabbits do it....do they?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 29, 2020, 10:37:00 AM
If they do, I bet it would be a funny sight.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on June 29, 2020, 10:40:47 AM
Our yard bunnies sprawl out on their tummies! It's very cute, and I have taken too many pictures of them doing it.  Usually they seem to like to do so in the dampish dirt by the patio after the sprinklers have been on, in the shade.  But they also just sprawl out on the lawn sometimes.  I do appreciate our bunny visitors. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: OneMoreYear on June 29, 2020, 11:12:35 AM
We have a yard bunny (bunnies?)! However, there are varying opinions regarding the bunny:
I think it's cute to see it frolicking in the grass.
SO thinks the bunny is ruining his garden and keeps threatening to find a recipe for rabbit stew.
Ninja (large black kitty) thinks the bunny looks like a fun toy.
Ricochet (squirrelly tortie) thinks the bunny does not look like much of a challenge and is happy to assist SO in his quest for stew if only we would let her outside (after which we would never see her again).
The bunny is apparently happily ignorant to the debate occurring 10 feet away.

We also occasionally have yard deer, which SO describes as "large white-tailed rats"
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on June 29, 2020, 01:22:38 PM
Your SO has my sympathies. We have tree rats (squirrels) and they have been pilfering my blueberries! Not a happy camper.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: waterboy on June 30, 2020, 08:53:39 AM
So...for birders...is it "pie-leated" or "pill-leated" woodpeckers?  I've always used "pie", but "tomato" "tomahto"?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on June 30, 2020, 09:17:37 AM
So...for birders...is it "pie-leated" or "pill-leated" woodpeckers?  I've always used "pie", but "tomato" "tomahto"?
I've always said "PILL-lee-eight-ed", but that's not based on any actual advanced knowledge of the pronunciation.  They're loud and (both literally and figuratively) striking birds!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on July 01, 2020, 04:38:39 AM
So...for birders...is it "pie-leated" or "pill-leated" woodpeckers?  I've always used "pie", but "tomato" "tomahto"?

Pill-ee-a-ted
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 01, 2020, 07:35:00 AM
I thought it was "pie-leated."  But really I just call them "Woody."
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: OneMoreYear on July 01, 2020, 11:54:25 AM
Your SO has my sympathies. We have tree rats (squirrels) and they have been pilfering my blueberries! Not a happy camper.

For some reason, squirrels are not on my SO's list of animals that get a "%$@! [animal-related adjective] rats" moniker.  We don't have berry bushes/trees though. We have installed some garden netting/fencing in hopes that the tomato plants make it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on July 01, 2020, 12:28:33 PM
Your SO has my sympathies. We have tree rats (squirrels) and they have been pilfering my blueberries! Not a happy camper.

For some reason, squirrels are not on my SO's list of animals that get a "%$@! [animal-related adjective] rats" moniker.  We don't have berry bushes/trees though. We have installed some garden netting/fencing in hopes that the tomato plants make it.

I know, 'rat' has a negative connotation. I actually prefer rats over squirrels- I used to have them as pets when I was a kid.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on July 03, 2020, 02:14:33 PM
Our really cute chipmunk is now staying under our wood wheelchair-access ramp during the heat of the day. Earlier in the morning, he/she can be found on our front porch looking for acorns and other edibles.

Frequently, while working these last 3.5 months from home, I have looked up from my desk in our former dining room and enjoyed seeing our completely adorable chipmunk between six and eight feet away--close enough to see its little jaw muscles chewing.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 03, 2020, 02:35:54 PM
Alvin!

OKaaayyy, Dave!

   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6zDY0DK2H8

(Well, it was just Christmas in June, right?)

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 06, 2020, 07:53:33 AM
My parents are convinced that they've seen bears several times in recent weeks.  What they're describing does indeed sound like black bears.  However, these have all been fleeting sightings from a distance, so I don't know.  Bear sightings are certainly a possibility where they live.  And where I live, for that matter.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 06, 2020, 08:05:48 AM
Reduced human movement may be emboldening them.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: RatGuy on July 06, 2020, 01:04:43 PM
When one of our rats crosses the rainbow bridge, we bury them in a flower pot with a plant that matched their personality. Back in March, we planted some seeds that we got from the Burpee rack at Target in Jasper's pot. Unfortunately, what has grown has now been identified as Canadian Nettle and I might be the world's worst gardener.

On the upside, we did see a fox a few nights ago. She was glorious.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on July 06, 2020, 01:42:31 PM
We have our first monarch caterpillars, with more eggs laid today!

They seem to love the hot, humid weather that makes me wilt.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on July 21, 2020, 07:42:38 AM
Iceland is still having earthquake swarms - the latest is in/around the Reykjanes Peninsula, which has seen earthquakes from magma intrusions off and on all this year.
https://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on August 14, 2020, 07:56:08 AM
From today's morning walk, a haiku and a tanka:

A morning cloud bank
Splashed with color by the dawn
A hawk soaring by


Though I hear thunder
I see gold in eastern clouds
And great rays of light
Though storms now engulf our world
The Son prepares his coming
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 20, 2020, 06:15:54 PM
Just ran across this.

Even better than Baby Yoda.

I'm in love..

   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGo0JIBrl8I

There's a longer one here:

   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvtSBGD9ZxQ

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on August 20, 2020, 06:31:57 PM
Saw a gopher having its dinner (grass) in the median beside a busy road on the way home.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on August 20, 2020, 07:43:18 PM
For my part, saw a seagull catch and swallow a herring.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Treehugger on August 21, 2020, 03:38:39 AM
For my part, saw a seagull catch and swallow a herring.

But ”seagulls” don’t exist. (http://environment.blogs.theledger.com/10567/seagulls-dont-exist/) :)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on August 21, 2020, 06:18:35 AM
For my part, saw a seagull catch and swallow a herring.

But ”seagulls” don’t exist. (http://environment.blogs.theledger.com/10567/seagulls-dont-exist/) :)

Indeed. But I don't know one gull from another.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 21, 2020, 06:20:13 AM
I'm sure Jonathan Livingston would have something to say about that.

Or squawk.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on August 21, 2020, 07:13:21 AM
I'm sure Jonathan Livingston would have something to say about that.

Or squawk.

M.

Jonathan Livingston would probably have been up for a long discussion on the nature of existence.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 21, 2020, 01:44:03 PM
Definitely.

And the merit of short wings in speedy flying.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on August 21, 2020, 09:15:31 PM
For my part, saw a seagull catch and swallow a herring.

But ”seagulls” don’t exist. (http://environment.blogs.theledger.com/10567/seagulls-dont-exist/) :)

Tell that to my dropping-covered car!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on August 22, 2020, 11:34:31 AM
I'm thankful we haven't had any unwanted guests lately, which may be due to having a good amount of landscaping done.  But I just got a bunch of pictures of a road runner on the patio outside my office window.  Just a second ago it was sitting on our little couch out there.  I think that's the closest I've been to one, other than an unfortunate incident my youngest had with one when we first moved here (she scared a baby or teenager out of a tree by accident... not her fault, but we felt bad!). 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on August 22, 2020, 01:08:36 PM
Do the idiots on jet skis on the lake count as fauna?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 23, 2020, 05:22:11 AM
Fauna-destroying fauna.

My day's start...guess it's new baby week...

   https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/uk-england-bristol-53874594

Sweet, hairy little one...

;--》

M.
   
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on August 23, 2020, 09:37:06 AM
I saw a dead jellyfish on my camping trip, but that's about it.

The occasional gray jay, bald eagle, and vulture, too. But the dead jellyfish is the only one of those I don't see daily at home.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 23, 2020, 09:44:44 AM
I'm sure Jonathan Livingston would have something to say about that.

Or squawk.

M.

Jonathan Livingston would probably have been up for a long discussion on the nature of existence.

This reminded me of this....

   https://youtu.be/hTcbhwA02fM

I've also heard it faster...

   https://youtu.be/gqdkjd4hszc

Anyway...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on September 01, 2020, 03:36:53 PM
A roadrunner (same one?) graced our patio again outside my office window.  This time, it fell into the same trap as all the other birds out there.  I guess my office window has a mirror effect during most of the day.  Many birds like to sit on our loveseat and peck at the window, or they fly into it, or what have you.  I usually take pictures of them but had to go out and tell the road runner to scram.  Its beak was like nails on a chalkboard.    There were three little baby birds out there last week, and one was trying to gnaw on the screen.  Who knows.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on September 03, 2020, 05:47:18 AM
A roadrunner (same one?) graced our patio again outside my office window.  This time, it fell into the same trap as all the other birds out there.  I guess my office window has a mirror effect during most of the day.  Many birds like to sit on our loveseat and peck at the window, or they fly into it, or what have you.  I usually take pictures of them but had to go out and tell the road runner to scram.  Its beak was like nails on a chalkboard.    There were three little baby birds out there last week, and one was trying to gnaw on the screen.  Who knows.

In the past, two hummingbirds, at different times, flew beak first into window screens.....and got stuck.  As I stood there like an idiot, they backed themselves out.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on September 03, 2020, 09:17:30 AM
A roadrunner (same one?) graced our patio again outside my office window.  This time, it fell into the same trap as all the other birds out there.  I guess my office window has a mirror effect during most of the day.  Many birds like to sit on our loveseat and peck at the window, or they fly into it, or what have you.  I usually take pictures of them but had to go out and tell the road runner to scram.  Its beak was like nails on a chalkboard.    There were three little baby birds out there last week, and one was trying to gnaw on the screen.  Who knows.

In the past, two hummingbirds, at different times, flew beak first into window screens.....and got stuck.  As I stood there like an idiot, they backed themselves out.

That gave me a much needed chuckle to picture! Birds are not the smartest sometimes.  I will never forget the one that decided to slam into the window on my left and nearly startle me right off of my chair.  Bad timing, as a very loud amber alert and just exploded on my phone from my right.  That was some very unneeded excitement in the span of about 2 seconds.

There was a little teenage bunny out back yesterday.  It always makes me laugh to see them freeze as though we won't see them if they're not in motion right in the middle of the yard.  They are so skittish! Luckily, they usually settle down and get back to their grassy meals. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 03, 2020, 09:21:07 AM
Yesterday a tiny lizard that we've been seeing out around the staff entrance was observed nosing around the door handle.  Almost like it was trying to break in.  I thought we could trust lizards better than that!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on September 03, 2020, 11:26:07 AM
Tiny dead garter snake today. Also a dead mouse or shrew being devoured by wasps.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on September 05, 2020, 01:58:53 PM
Saw a deer on the side of the road as I was driving home from work last night. It was after 8 pm and already dark. (Seems like it's getting darker earlier nowadays) Fortunately there was a nearby street light so I could spot the deer. Just be on the look out for 'em at night; there won't always be a street light or lights from neighbors' houses.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 07, 2020, 02:52:14 PM
Yesterday a tiny lizard that we've been seeing out around the staff entrance was observed nosing around the door handle.  Almost like it was trying to break in.  I thought we could trust lizards better than that!

Glossie Fink-Nottle!

Alas, we knew you well...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 08, 2020, 07:20:58 AM
Big, loud neighbor dog
With a voice that shakes the ground
Why do you bark so?
I'm picking my own flowers
On my own side of the fence
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 10, 2020, 07:40:31 AM
The flowers are gardenias.  Both of my gardenia bushes have now flowered three times this year.  I've only ever known them to do it once a year before.  My yard, house, and office all smell like gardenias now!  It's delightful.  And I've had some to give to staff members.

I don't know why they're doing so well.  I guess something about the combination of alternating wet and dry spells this summer has resulted in optimum conditions for them.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 10, 2020, 08:20:20 AM
Yesterday a tiny lizard that we've been seeing out around the staff entrance was observed nosing around the door handle.  Almost like it was trying to break in.  I thought we could trust lizards better than that!

Glossie Fink-Nottle!

Alas, we knew you well...

M.

Just for the uninitiated:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwIDgUp2S2E

Betcha can't watch just one....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 10, 2020, 09:54:26 AM
Challenge accepted.


Damn.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 10, 2020, 12:15:38 PM
Yes, the Drones and their associated genetic affiliates are a species all their own...

;--}

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 14, 2020, 07:52:09 AM
And the gardenias just keep coming!  I normally don't see them after early summer, and now I've got them in the middle of September.  I'm not complaining--but it is weird.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on September 14, 2020, 12:06:34 PM
And the gardenias just keep coming!  I normally don't see them after early summer, and now I've got them in the middle of September.  I'm not complaining--but it is weird.
Snap a few photos of them while they're in bloom!  It'll make for a fun story to tell down the road.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on September 14, 2020, 02:27:02 PM
A doe and a fawn came up to the door just now. That was nice!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 14, 2020, 03:38:52 PM
I interrupted some potential box turtle sex when I stumbled upon them both under a gardenia bush in my backyard. Of course, I had to examine them (channeling Gerald Durrell). Pretty sure one was male (concave underside) and the other was female (flat underside). They both hissed at me, I put them back and went on my way.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 14, 2020, 04:16:12 PM
You prurient philistine, you.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on September 14, 2020, 04:57:41 PM
In other turtle news, I came across a tiny baby snapping turtle (size of a silver dollar) in the middle of the multi-use path along the river, and concluding that it was unlikely to safely make the transit without getting run over by a bike, transported it to the edge of the water. It withdrew into its shell during this  experience, but I'm counting on its tiny reptilian brain to protect it from traumatic memories of teleportation.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 14, 2020, 05:00:20 PM
You prurient philistine, you.

M.

:O

Well, it was potential coitus. Or, maybe after the fact. No idea.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on September 16, 2020, 05:45:36 AM
You prurient philistine, you.

M.

:O

Well, it was potential coitus. Or, maybe after the fact. No idea.

Did you detect the tangy aroma of Lucky Strikes?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 16, 2020, 04:01:50 PM
You prurient philistine, you.

M.

:O

Well, it was potential coitus. Or, maybe after the fact. No idea.

Did you detect the tangy aroma of Lucky Strikes?

Hahaha!

Nope. They were gone the next day. I live in a suburban/country/rural area (lots of woods interspersed between neighborhoods) so I'm often treated to wildlife romping through backyards or roaming down the neighborhood streets.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 16, 2020, 08:47:28 PM
And some of them even have four legs.

;--}

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 16, 2020, 09:10:56 PM
And some of them even have four legs.

;--}

M.

Ha!

We've had neighbors see coyotes (I haven't seen any), but it's really not that rare to see them. They've been sighted downtown. Anyway, I've seen deer roam through the back yard, down the street, etc. I've seen deer remains on the side of the main road (not in the neighborhood) during hunting season (ew). Plenty of hawks and owls out here (an owl swooped over my head one night- very cool). I also rescued a barred owl on the side of the road (was hit by a car) a few years ago and took it to a wildlife rehabilitation place. That happened during rush hour when I was on the way to give a final exam.

We have lots of songbirds (cardinals, titmice, chickadees, Carolina wrens, woodpeckers, flickers, thrashers, finches, sparrows, goldfinches, blue birds, etc. , reptiles (Carolina anoles, blue-tailed skinks), amphibians (usually tree frogs), feral cats, squirrels, chipmunks, probably some voles, and...
I think I'll stop here.

Edit: I forgot to mention the insects and snakes! Copperheads!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on September 24, 2020, 02:45:26 PM
This morning I almost walked right into a bobcat kitten in our backyard when I popped out of the backdoor. Later I watched mom and three kittens enjoy the morning--Mom snoozing, kitten #1 having a delightful time throwing a dead squirrel around, kitten #2 desperately trying to steal the squirrel, and kitten #3 (much smaller than the other two) hanging back and watching. Also watching were a lot of unhappy crows and magpies.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 24, 2020, 02:56:17 PM
This morning I almost walked right into a bobcat kitten in our backyard when I popped out of the backdoor. Later I watched mom and three kittens enjoy the morning--Mom snoozing, kitten #1 having a delightful time throwing a dead squirrel around, kitten #2 desperately trying to steal the squirrel, and kitten #3 (much smaller than the other two) hanging back and watching. Also watching were a lot of unhappy crows and magpies.

Their version of 'kick the can?' Sorry, that was inappropriate.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on September 25, 2020, 05:47:52 AM
This morning I almost walked right into a bobcat kitten in our backyard when I popped out of the backdoor. Later I watched mom and three kittens enjoy the morning--Mom snoozing, kitten #1 having a delightful time throwing a dead squirrel around, kitten #2 desperately trying to steal the squirrel, and kitten #3 (much smaller than the other two) hanging back and watching. Also watching were a lot of unhappy crows and magpies.

Their version of 'kick the can?' Sorry, that was inappropriate.

Still giggling over Kick the Can.  THANKS!!!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 25, 2020, 06:52:25 AM
This morning I almost walked right into a bobcat kitten in our backyard when I popped out of the backdoor. Later I watched mom and three kittens enjoy the morning--Mom snoozing, kitten #1 having a delightful time throwing a dead squirrel around, kitten #2 desperately trying to steal the squirrel, and kitten #3 (much smaller than the other two) hanging back and watching. Also watching were a lot of unhappy crows and magpies.

Their version of 'kick the can?' Sorry, that was inappropriate.

Still giggling over Kick the Can.  THANKS!!!

I know. Horrible. My sense of humor has always been a bit morbid.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on September 25, 2020, 09:31:22 AM
There's a young fox in my yard eating fallen cherries.

And ugh! a dead bird for dessert,
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 25, 2020, 11:46:12 AM
There's a young fox in my yard eating fallen cherries.

And ugh! a dead bird for dessert,

Well, that took a tern for the worse....
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on September 25, 2020, 12:35:01 PM
Yeah, but I give him credit for wearing a mask.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on September 25, 2020, 01:47:29 PM
Yeah, but I give him credit for wearing a mask.

You aren't wrong, I'll give you that.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on September 26, 2020, 05:11:49 AM
I’m taking care of a small farm for a month or so. Last night I watched a blue heron fly over the pastures, and this morning as I walked out of the barn, I was greeted by three deer. A few days ago a golden eagle was hanging around.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 28, 2020, 07:39:29 AM
This morning I almost walked right into a bobcat kitten in our backyard when I popped out of the backdoor. Later I watched mom and three kittens enjoy the morning--Mom snoozing, kitten #1 having a delightful time throwing a dead squirrel around, kitten #2 desperately trying to steal the squirrel, and kitten #3 (much smaller than the other two) hanging back and watching. Also watching were a lot of unhappy crows and magpies.

Wow!  Mom and Dad are impressed by a recent game camera picture of a bobcat on the back section of their property.  Your encounter was much closer.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on September 28, 2020, 07:45:56 AM
I have a moral problem throwing out food, so when I have stale bread, donuts or fruit past its prime I cut things into chunks and put them on the back lawn.  They are always gone overnight but until last night I never saw the beneficiaries.  Insomnia had me looking out at 1 AM.

A porcupine and a raccoon were checking out my refuse site--nothing there however.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on September 28, 2020, 08:52:38 AM
Youngest daughter apparently had a stowaway under her vehicle when she came home from the grocery store.  When she got home, her granddad saw something hanging from the undercarriage.  It was a squirrel, dropped to the ground and limped away to the sidewalk and collapsed.  Poor guy was probably white-knuckling it the whole way home.  After a few minutes, he got up and moved away from the scene, presumably to try to catch a ride back using safer means of transportation.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 28, 2020, 09:29:05 AM
Youngest daughter apparently had a stowaway under her vehicle when she came home from the grocery store.  When she got home, her granddad saw something hanging from the undercarriage.  It was a squirrel, dropped to the ground and limped away to the sidewalk and collapsed.  Poor guy was probably white-knuckling it the whole way home.  After a few minutes, he got up and moved away from the scene, presumably to try to catch a ride back using safer means of transportation.

Sounds like somebody I knew years ago who learned that the big "leaf" that had been wrapped around her car's antenna during the long drive into work was actually a dazed bat.  Must have been a terrifying experience for the poor thing.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on September 28, 2020, 09:40:44 AM
Youngest daughter apparently had a stowaway under her vehicle when she came home from the grocery store.  When she got home, her granddad saw something hanging from the undercarriage.  It was a squirrel, dropped to the ground and limped away to the sidewalk and collapsed.  Poor guy was probably white-knuckling it the whole way home.  After a few minutes, he got up and moved away from the scene, presumably to try to catch a ride back using safer means of transportation.

Sounds like somebody I knew years ago who learned that the big "leaf" that had been wrapped around her car's antenna during the long drive into work was actually a dazed bat.  Must have been a terrifying experience for the poor thing.

I would not have wanted to be the bat or the person who discovered the bat!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on September 29, 2020, 04:45:35 PM
Nother dead garter snake today.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on October 04, 2020, 06:11:14 PM
Nother dead garter snake today.

And again. Poor loves. Why are they all out and about now? It's not even warm.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on October 05, 2020, 05:14:15 AM
Recently, my cousin and his helper were cutting down a dead tree on my property when I heard a brouhaha.  I rushed out, ready to diall 911.....but garter snakes had housed themselves between the bark and the tree trunk and come sprawling out, much to the consternation of the hewers.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 05, 2020, 05:59:20 AM
I was mowing the back 40 on Saturday and came out of the brush to find a Red0-tailed hawk on the ground scarfing a mouse.

Hawk gave me a look like 'sup?  I stopped, turned off the mower and just got to watch from <10 feet away for about 5min.

Then, Hawk ran/flapped up the slope of the septic field, and watched me carry on.  Totally unruffled.

So cool.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 05, 2020, 07:39:50 AM
Our pastor's wife saw a bear amble by near their house a couple of days ago.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on October 06, 2020, 12:35:21 PM
I was mowing the back 40 on Saturday and came out of the brush to find a Red0-tailed hawk on the ground scarfing a mouse.

Hawk gave me a look like 'sup?  I stopped, turned off the mower and just got to watch from <10 feet away for about 5min.

Then, Hawk ran/flapped up the slope of the septic field, and watched me carry on.  Totally unruffled.

So cool.

Would you post this in "Look A Bird"  thread, too??
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 06, 2020, 12:41:03 PM
I was mowing the back 40 on Saturday and came out of the brush to find a Red0-tailed hawk on the ground scarfing a mouse.

Hawk gave me a look like 'sup?  I stopped, turned off the mower and just got to watch from <10 feet away for about 5min.

Then, Hawk ran/flapped up the slope of the septic field, and watched me carry on.  Totally unruffled.

So cool.

Would you post this in "Look A Bird"  thread, too??

Done
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on October 09, 2020, 07:14:53 AM
A critter (unknown) dug up a 7ft by 7ft section of my back lawn last night, leaving dozens of small piles of dirt.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 09, 2020, 07:23:49 AM
A critter (unknown) dug up a 7ft by 7ft section of my back lawn last night, leaving dozens of small piles of dirt.

Sounds like an armadillo.  They're very hard to trap or otherwise drive away. 

Lately my parents have been dealing with a plague of armadillos digging up their yard.  Dad has taken to using their Chihuahua to sniff them out in the evenings and then shoot them.  I'm told he got one just last night.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on October 09, 2020, 07:26:13 AM
Unlikely. I'm way too far north for an armadillo.  A mole? A badger?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 09, 2020, 07:55:39 AM
Unlikely. I'm way too far north for an armadillo.  A mole? A badger?

I thought "armadillo" because that's the usual suspect here.  It could be several other kinds of digging critters. 

With warming climate conditions the armadillos are expanding their range aggressively.  If you don't have them now, don't rule out the possibility of seeing them someday....
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 09, 2020, 08:15:43 AM
Could be a skunk if you have grubs.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on October 09, 2020, 08:37:49 AM
Could be a skunk if you have grubs.

We had some experience with this, unfortunately.  The exterminator pointed out how the ground feels when there are grubs.  It was kind of squishy? It didn't have the same firmness as other parts of the lawn.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on October 09, 2020, 09:13:24 AM
My neighbour reports grubs so I probably have them. It's a section of lawn I don't usually walk on (dead centre) so squishy is possible.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 09, 2020, 10:47:55 AM
If you pull up a section of turf, the grubs are big white caterpillar looking things (and they can be big, size of a nectarine, for example).

If so, you can apply nematodes.  Better than poison as they kill the grubs by breeding in them and then are released at death to get the next ones.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on October 09, 2020, 12:25:10 PM
In South Carolina I had Japanese Beetles.  The grubs eat the grass.  You could tell you had them because you could take a rake and essentially rake up your lawn.  the grubs ate so much of the roots that there was little holding the grass to the ground. IF you moved some grass and then took a hoe or small shovel and turned the dirt you could pull out a lot of them.

The cure for me was a product called Milky Spore.  I dont know if its effectiveness was limited to the Japanese beetle grub, but it was something that infected the grub like a fungus or something and once applied, it stayed in the ground waiting for the next batch of grubs to emerge.  I think that some neighbors applied it a few times to make sure, but I didnt live there long enough for multiple attempts.

At my current house, I know that I had a batch of grubs from June Bugs I think. It was the same problem... grass essentially dies, then you pull it up in clumps, and if you raked the soil under, there were grubs galore!  My neighbors have lost a lot of their grass.

I applied a Beyer poison for them, as I could not find Milky Spore in this part of the country (either becuase it is not effective, or not yet been made popular here.

I would suggest another possible source of the small dirt piles :  Squirrels.  Might they be burrying or searching for their stash?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on October 09, 2020, 12:49:28 PM
Tks Clean and Fishprof. The lawn is pretty healthy. Even if there are grubs, it's the size of a football field so nematodes might be too ambitious.  Whatever did this did it at night, so probably not squirrels. And the dirt piles are too big for squirrels.  I'm thinking moles.

Unfortunately it's too dark out there at night to catch the culprits at work.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 09, 2020, 01:14:21 PM
Moles can be driven away with ultrasonic noise. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on October 09, 2020, 02:17:48 PM
iN my experience, moles leave tunnels, so you can see a 'trail' of pushed up dirt.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on October 09, 2020, 03:54:43 PM
iN my experience, moles leave tunnels, so you can see a 'trail' of pushed up dirt.

Yup! That's exactly what I see.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on October 12, 2020, 08:29:27 PM
This morning, my dog encountered a large toad on our walk.  After a good sniff, they went their separate ways.

Tonight on our walk, I saw a large owl in the twilight sky passing right overhead.  Too dark to provide further details, but it was huge!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 13, 2020, 06:41:44 AM
My car and I ENCOUNTERED a bullfrog hopping across the road in the rain.  I swerved, he hopped. 

No thump.

So all seems to be well in our respective worlds.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 13, 2020, 07:13:11 AM
A lizard ran into my house a couple of evenings ago.  I tried to catch it.  It left its tail wriggling in my hand.  Then it darted under a couch.  Rather than dive under and try to find it there, I just sat down in a nearby chair.  After a bit I saw it trying to climb the wall toward the window sill.  I caught it in a plastic container and released it outside.  Hopefully I didn't hurt it in the scuffle.

Wonder how long it will take to regenerate its tail?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on October 13, 2020, 08:31:42 AM
Salamanders were said to be able to do that (as well as walk through fire, per some medieval legends); I didn't know other critters could (well, except starfish).

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 13, 2020, 09:14:14 AM
Most lizards can drop their tails when threatened, and most of them can regrow them.    Bearded dragons can lose and regrow, crested geckoes drop but do not regrow, and Komodo dragons don't do either.

And  sea cucumbers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_y4DbZivHCY&list=FL4CwFjt4D2LkNT1DRyXpZoA&index=2131&ab_channel=zefrank1) can lose their internal organs (evisceration) and regrow them.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on October 13, 2020, 09:34:56 AM
Most lizards can drop their tails when threatened, and most of them can regrow them.    Bearded dragons can lose and regrow, crested geckoes drop but do not regrow, and Komodo dragons don't do either.

And  sea cucumbers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_y4DbZivHCY&list=FL4CwFjt4D2LkNT1DRyXpZoA&index=2131&ab_channel=zefrank1) can lose their internal organs (evisceration) and regrow them.

Neat! I'm so glad I have an ordinary anus.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 13, 2020, 09:39:22 AM
Confirmed: Uranus Smells Like Farts (https://gizmodo.com/stinky-molecules-confirm-uranus-smells-like-farts-1825467106)

Because I am 12....
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on October 13, 2020, 09:56:01 AM
Confirmed: Uranus Smells Like Farts (https://gizmodo.com/stinky-molecules-confirm-uranus-smells-like-farts-1825467106)

Because I am 12....

True.

"...astronomers renamed Uranus in 2620 to end that stupid joke once and for all.."

https://theinfosphere.org/Urectum (https://theinfosphere.org/Urectum)

We also love the 'True Facts' series. Here's one that's thread appropriate.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADrBo7u3tR4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADrBo7u3tR4)

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 13, 2020, 01:27:54 PM
Most lizards can drop their tails when threatened, and most of them can regrow them.    Bearded dragons can lose and regrow, crested geckoes drop but do not regrow, and Komodo dragons don't do either.

And  sea cucumbers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_y4DbZivHCY&list=FL4CwFjt4D2LkNT1DRyXpZoA&index=2131&ab_channel=zefrank1) can lose their internal organs (evisceration) and regrow them.

Komodo dragons don't have to worry too much about anything grabbing them by the tail. in the first place...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 13, 2020, 04:03:12 PM
Komodo dragons don't have to worry too much about anything grabbing them by the tail. in the first place...

Yes, they do.  Other KDs.  That's why dropping a tail doesn't make sense.  They regularly get into tussles.

Also, regrowing a 70kg tail is no mean feat.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 14, 2020, 06:24:53 AM
Komodo dragons don't have to worry too much about anything grabbing them by the tail. in the first place...

Yes, they do.  Other KDs.  That's why dropping a tail doesn't make sense.  They regularly get into tussles.

Also, regrowing a 70kg tail is no mean feat.

Well, I was thinking in terms of their not having to worry about predators.  I'd hate to see the cat that could grab a Komodo dragon by the tail!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 14, 2020, 07:47:46 AM
Florida panthers kill and eat comparably sized alligators.

Although they don't grab them by the tail...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 14, 2020, 09:58:35 AM
Florida panthers kill and eat comparably sized alligators.

Although they don't grab them by the tail...

Did not know that Florida panthers had a taste for gator meat.  You learn something new every day!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 14, 2020, 10:12:15 AM
I suspect that the ""Jagulars dropping from trees" in Winnie the Pooh is a reference to panthers (a.k.a. Jaguar, Cougar, Catamount, Painter, etc etc) dropping on 'gators from above.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 14, 2020, 10:28:53 AM
Jagulars go for the jugular. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 14, 2020, 11:06:23 AM
First they cry "Halp Halp" to get you to look up.  THEN they drop.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on October 14, 2020, 11:10:20 AM
Quote
Jagulars go for the jugular.

That probably comes as a relief for the jugglers that hang out at the carnivals or those attending Ringling College (in Sarasota, Fl).

(However, I had not before thought about the natural predator of jugglers... what keeps them from taking over the world?)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 14, 2020, 11:49:40 AM
Jagulars also won't eat clowns.

They taste funny.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on October 14, 2020, 12:03:05 PM
Not all jugglers are clowns!  See Penn Juliet (Penn and Teller), who are magicians, or one is a magician and the other a juggler.

Also, Steve martin!

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on October 14, 2020, 12:47:19 PM
Not all jugglers are clowns!  See Penn Juliet (Penn and Teller), who are magicians, or one is a magician and the other a juggler.

Also, Steve martin!

Maybe not the juggling you meant...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bGVT4-1DBU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bGVT4-1DBU)

I know. I'm bad.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 14, 2020, 01:48:14 PM
Not all jugglers are clowns!  See Penn Juliet (Penn and Teller), who are magicians, or one is a magician and the other a juggler.

I don't believe I implied that.  And it's Penn Jillette.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on October 15, 2020, 03:23:31 PM
More baby panda news from the National Zoo: eyes and ears open!

   https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/news/pandastory-fruitsicles-and-feistiness

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on October 16, 2020, 06:23:40 AM
More baby panda news from the National Zoo: eyes and ears open!

   https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/news/pandastory-fruitsicles-and-feistiness

M.

I adore the panda cam!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on November 06, 2020, 07:46:29 AM
This morning I was returning home via an alley from my morning walk and encountered an armadillo.  I halted near it and observed it rooting around.  It kept rooting closer and closer to me until it was right at my feet.  Then it looked up, sniffed of my foot, and moved aside to continue rooting. 

When it turned its back on me, I bent over and petted its back.  It evidently couldn't feel my hand through its shell.  Nor did it react when I touched its tail.  Nor did it react when I started walking away, still only a couple of feet from it.  Talk about imperturbable! 

You don't realize until you've observed a live one up close just how weird those critters are.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on November 06, 2020, 08:21:03 AM
This morning I was returning home via an alley from my morning walk and encountered an armadillo.  I halted near it and observed it rooting around.  It kept rooting closer and closer to me until it was right at my feet.  Then it looked up, sniffed of my foot, and moved aside to continue rooting. 

When it turned its back on me, I bent over and petted its back.  It evidently couldn't feel my hand through its shell.  Nor did it react when I touched its tail.  Nor did it react when I started walking away, still only a couple of feet from it.  Talk about imperturbable! 

You don't realize until you've observed a live one up close just how weird those critters are.
They are weird and cool.  What a neat encounter!

You may already know this, but in case not -- armadillos can transmit leprosy to humans (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-armadillos-can-spread-leprosy-180954440/#:~:text=Armadillos%20are%20the%20only%20other%20animals%20besides%20humans,shared%20the%20same%20exact%20strain%20of%20the%20disease.), so be sure to wash your hands very well if you come into contact with them.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on November 06, 2020, 08:56:28 AM
This morning I was returning home via an alley from my morning walk and encountered an armadillo.  I halted near it and observed it rooting around.  It kept rooting closer and closer to me until it was right at my feet.  Then it looked up, sniffed of my foot, and moved aside to continue rooting. 

When it turned its back on me, I bent over and petted its back.  It evidently couldn't feel my hand through its shell.  Nor did it react when I touched its tail.  Nor did it react when I started walking away, still only a couple of feet from it.  Talk about imperturbable! 

You don't realize until you've observed a live one up close just how weird those critters are.

That sounds like quite an experience! I thought I had heard that it was not a good idea to make contact with armadillos, though? Here's a CDC article recommending not to, though it seems the risk is low.  https://www.cdc.gov/leprosy/transmission/index.html  Just be careful!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on November 06, 2020, 10:11:42 AM
This morning I was returning home via an alley from my morning walk and encountered an armadillo.  I halted near it and observed it rooting around.  It kept rooting closer and closer to me until it was right at my feet.  Then it looked up, sniffed of my foot, and moved aside to continue rooting. 

When it turned its back on me, I bent over and petted its back.  It evidently couldn't feel my hand through its shell.  Nor did it react when I touched its tail.  Nor did it react when I started walking away, still only a couple of feet from it.  Talk about imperturbable! 

You don't realize until you've observed a live one up close just how weird those critters are.
They are weird and cool.  What a neat encounter!

You may already know this, but in case not -- armadillos can transmit leprosy to humans (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-armadillos-can-spread-leprosy-180954440/#:~:text=Armadillos%20are%20the%20only%20other%20animals%20besides%20humans,shared%20the%20same%20exact%20strain%20of%20the%20disease.), so be sure to wash your hands very well if you come into contact with them.

Yes, I knew about the armadillos and leprosy connection.  I wash my hands faithfully on coming home from those morning walks, since I often pick up trash along the way.

Apparently the risk isn't too great.  A town in our state has an annual "Armadillo Festival" that includes actual armadillo eating.  I've never heard of anybody catching it there.  It remains one wild meat that I, personally, have never sought to sample.

BTW, an armadillo shell feels as hard as a turtle shell.   
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on November 06, 2020, 07:11:04 PM
I had a similar armadillo encounter a few years back, though I did not touch it.  In the daylight, they don't see well at all.  I was close enough to touch it.  After a while, it raised up and sniffed, caught my scent, and ambled off.  They are remarkably weird creatures.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on November 06, 2020, 07:54:17 PM
This morning I was returning home via an alley from my morning walk and encountered an armadillo.  I halted near it and observed it rooting around.  It kept rooting closer and closer to me until it was right at my feet.  Then it looked up, sniffed of my foot, and moved aside to continue rooting. 

When it turned its back on me, I bent over and petted its back.  It evidently couldn't feel my hand through its shell.  Nor did it react when I touched its tail.  Nor did it react when I started walking away, still only a couple of feet from it.  Talk about imperturbable! 

You don't realize until you've observed a live one up close just how weird those critters are.

It's almost as if they're aliens from another world.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 07, 2020, 09:39:44 AM
The salmon are running. Gonna try to see if I can see any at high tide.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on November 09, 2020, 08:18:24 AM
While walking this morning I kept hearing nuts falling from the trees.  Some of the impacts I heard made me glad I didn't catch it in the head.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 09, 2020, 08:22:07 AM
The salmon are running. Gonna try to see if I can see any at high tide.

Didn't, alas.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on February 20, 2021, 05:00:16 PM
Some orcas were apparently in the vicinity, so we headed out to see if we could see 'em.

Didn't see any orcas, but did see three harbour seals (clearly hiding from the orcas, in very shallow water behind a small island close to shore), one river otter, and a large bald eagle.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on February 20, 2021, 06:40:30 PM
While walking this morning I kept hearing nuts falling from the trees.  Some of the impacts I heard made me glad I didn't catch it in the head.

The second group of gravestones on my usual tour is right under a very large (maybe 75 year-old) oak tree.

Theres an angry squirrel up there most Saturdays, and he ?(she) loves to use my mob cap for target practice.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on February 21, 2021, 01:39:52 AM
I caught a glimpse of a canid (fox or coyote, I wasn't sure) silhouetted against the snow late one recent night.  It reminded me of another time that spouse and I were out for a walk and saw a fox hunting (doing that vertical pounce that foxes do) in a nearby cemetery.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on April 13, 2021, 01:58:37 PM
Coming back to this thread to say that I saw a fox (!!!) during this morning's walk.

Just as the sun was rising, I was walking west on Market Street in Greensboro just before the X intersection with Friendly Avenue (look for "Lake Daniel Park" on Google and scroll southwards slowly) and as I came around the corner a young (or underweight) fox saw me, pricked its ears, stopped in its tracks, and walked back across the X intersection to the other side--not fast, just enough to let me know it could have run from me if it wanted to. It then waited--only about 20-25 yards away--for me to cross northward back toward Lake Daniel Park before it crossed eastward, behind me, a bit faster--fast enough that the tail belled out behind it, but not a run. I looked back a couple of times to see it cantering across the grass toward the underbrush, but it didn't seem to pay any more attention to me after it figured out what I wasn't going to bother it.

I've been waiting for several years to see a fox near my house. Eagles, hawks, a chipmunk, squirrels, birds, snakes, sure--but a fox (!!!). Now that's wild.

All puns intended. <grin>
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 13, 2021, 02:13:14 PM
Coming back to this thread to say that I saw a fox (!!!) during this morning's walk.

Just as the sun was rising, I was walking west on Market Street in Greensboro just before the X intersection with Friendly Avenue (look for "Lake Daniel Park" on Google and scroll southwards slowly) and as I came around the corner a young (or underweight) fox saw me, pricked its ears, stopped in its tracks, and walked back across the X intersection to the other side--not fast, just enough to let me know it could have run from me if it wanted to. It then waited--only about 20-25 yards away--for me to cross northward back toward Lake Daniel Park before it crossed eastward, behind me, a bit faster--fast enough that the tail belled out behind it, but not a run. I looked back a couple of times to see it cantering across the grass toward the underbrush, but it didn't seem to pay any more attention to me after it figured out what I wasn't going to bother it.

I've been waiting for several years to see a fox near my house. Eagles, hawks, a chipmunk, squirrels, birds, snakes, sure--but a fox (!!!). Now that's wild.

All puns intended. <grin>

Very, very cool!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on April 13, 2021, 04:33:59 PM
Coming back to this thread to say that I saw a fox (!!!) during this morning's walk.

Just as the sun was rising, I was walking west on Market Street in Greensboro just before the X intersection with Friendly Avenue (look for "Lake Daniel Park" on Google and scroll southwards slowly) and as I came around the corner a young (or underweight) fox saw me, pricked its ears, stopped in its tracks, and walked back across the X intersection to the other side--not fast, just enough to let me know it could have run from me if it wanted to. It then waited--only about 20-25 yards away--for me to cross northward back toward Lake Daniel Park before it crossed eastward, behind me, a bit faster--fast enough that the tail belled out behind it, but not a run. I looked back a couple of times to see it cantering across the grass toward the underbrush, but it didn't seem to pay any more attention to me after it figured out what I wasn't going to bother it.

I've been waiting for several years to see a fox near my house. Eagles, hawks, a chipmunk, squirrels, birds, snakes, sure--but a fox (!!!). Now that's wild.

All puns intended. <grin>
And for us, a rare PaulTuttle sighting!   

What a nice way to start your day, Paul!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 14, 2021, 06:22:50 AM
This morning a staff member told me about seeing something in her yard that looked like a mountain lion.  I'm never sure what to make of such sightings.  Mountain lions do, on rare occasions, pass through the region.  But it's hard to believe that those occasional transients are responsible for all or most of the big cat sightings we have. 

Maybe it was a bobcat, or a big stray dog?  She insists that it was feline and had a long tail.  I know from experience that unexpected sightings of wildlife in low-light conditions can make your mind play tricks on you.  Some years ago I was startled by the sighting of a classic "grey" alien one evening right here in town, on the banks of a stream.  Then something seemed to click inside my head, and suddenly the "alien" became a big grey heron, standing on the bank and drawn up to its full height.  I had been seeing herons very regularly on morning walks in the nearby city park.  Somehow seeing one in an unfamiliar spot, at an unfamiliar time, in an unfamiliar pose, turned it into something bizarre and disturbing.  If I wasn't somebody who was familiar with herons I might well carry to this day the eerie memory of seeing an "alien."

So maybe some trick of perception explains her wildcat sighting.  Then again, where we live a mountain lion is not outside the realm of possibility.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 14, 2021, 08:23:07 AM
There is a grey tree frog living on one of my porch lights. It has vocalized quite a bit, which I don't mind. I think there is another one hiding somewhere among the potted plants.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on April 15, 2021, 02:56:36 PM
There was some kind of hawk or falcon in a nearby tree just a few minutes ago, but it flew off when I went to get the binocs.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: spork on April 15, 2021, 03:34:57 PM
Many bunnies in the backyard so far this spring. I wish some of the coyotes that hang out in a wooded park one block over would start patrolling my property.

Encountered a possum in my driveway a few nights ago. It quickly waddled over to the neighbor's backyard when I appeared. I think it had been trying to get into my trash can. This is the first possum I've seen here since moving in a dozen years ago.

And last Sunday morning, while on a pre-dawn run, a coyote and I locked eyes while I was passing the park mentioned above.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 16, 2021, 08:04:38 AM
Many bunnies in the backyard so far this spring. I wish some of the coyotes that hang out in a wooded park one block over would start patrolling my property.

Encountered a possum in my driveway a few nights ago. It quickly waddled over to the neighbor's backyard when I appeared. I think it had been trying to get into my trash can. This is the first possum I've seen here since moving in a dozen years ago.

And last Sunday morning, while on a pre-dawn run, a coyote and I locked eyes while I was passing the park mentioned above.

When my brother was stationed in Iraq some years ago he used to go for regular jogs around the base area in early morning or late evening.  There were some wild canids there that looked a lot like coyotes (They did not look like the familiar pariah dogs that are also found in the Middle East).  Some of them would jog along with him.  On his last jog, just before he returned stateside, a pack of them came out and trotted along with him in formation.  It was as if they were telling him goodbye.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on April 17, 2021, 04:40:21 AM
I've been absent from the Fora for months while house hunting. My landlady of the lake decided to cash in on the pandemic and sell.

So this month I moved again to a country locale but now the view from my desk window is of my landlord's van.

However, yesterday a rabbit hopped by.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on April 17, 2021, 06:04:02 AM
I've been absent from the Fora for months while house hunting. My landlady of the lake decided to cash in on the pandemic and sell.

So this month I moved again to a country locale but now the view from my desk window is of my landlord's van.

However, yesterday a rabbit hopped by.
Oh, Catherder, I'm so sorry you've had to move and have lost your incredible view! :( 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on April 17, 2021, 06:18:41 AM
Not all is lost. A squirrel just scampered by with half a baked corn cob in its mouth, purloined from a neighbour's bbq.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 19, 2021, 07:18:28 AM
On a morning street
The shadow of a phone line
With a shadow squirrel
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 24, 2021, 08:00:58 PM
A 6.9 earthquake off the coast of Japan near Tokyo, today, did not, thankfully, result in a tsunami.

   https://www.cnn.com/2021/03/20/asia/japan-earthquake-intl/index.html

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on April 25, 2021, 07:13:41 AM
Found a tick on the toilet seat this morning.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 25, 2021, 08:23:35 AM
Found a tick on the toilet seat this morning.

Not a place I'd like to get a tick...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 25, 2021, 11:22:31 AM
A 6.9 earthquake off the coast of Japan near Tokyo, today, did not, thankfully, result in a tsunami.

   https://www.cnn.com/2021/03/20/asia/japan-earthquake-intl/index.html

M.

Apparently an unconnected quake of similar magnitude happened near Ecuador as well:

   https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/japan-and-ecuador-earthquakes-why-does-it-feel-like-there-are-so-many-tremors-and-are-they-connected-a6990016.html

Reports of fatalities, injuries and individuals missing in Japan are appearing:

   https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/japan-earthquake-latest-death-toll-missing-hokkaido-search-rescue-a8526711.html

A tsunami warning was also issued, but later cancelled.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: cathwen on April 25, 2021, 12:21:07 PM
A tick on the toilet seat?  Ugh!  And I thought that the very large cellar spider in the corner of my shower was a little creepy! 

Cellar spiders are the ones with the long gray bodies and very long legs.  They are not harmful, but this one has a disconcerting habit of lunging at me from its high corner when I get into the shower.  It does not lunge far, and it then stops.  Cellar spiders are actually beneficial, so I will not kill it.  I can’t reach it, anyway. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: downer on April 25, 2021, 03:39:03 PM
Is it an outside toilet?

Rhode Island’s Tick Encounter Resource Center (TERC) reports the results of a study where immature deer ticks that were exposed to indoor humidity levels of 75 percent died in about eight hours. https://www.bobvila.com/articles/ticks-in-the-house/
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on April 25, 2021, 03:56:25 PM
Is it an outside toilet?

Nono, the indoor one.

I can only assume it hitched a ride in on a cat, evaded my tick check, and fell off when he went to lap tub water.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on April 25, 2021, 04:26:03 PM
I have not mowed my back yard. It needs it!  However, Ive been looking out the back window and seeing that there are some birds that are really enjoying the hip high weeds.
I have a picture of a painted bunting. Ididnt know it was a painted bunting, so I searched online and see that in addition, I have been seeing a female one too.  There are som blue birds of some sort there too. 

I suppose that I can mow the yard in June.  I will have to get the weed eater to knock down parts of it by then before I can mow it. 

My mom reports that my dad wont mow areas that have wild flowers in the yard either. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on April 26, 2021, 05:23:29 AM
I have not mowed my back yard. It needs it!  However, Ive been looking out the back window and seeing that there are some birds that are really enjoying the hip high weeds.
I have a picture of a painted bunting. Ididnt know it was a painted bunting, so I searched online and see that in addition, I have been seeing a female one too.  There are som blue birds of some sort there too. 

I suppose that I can mow the yard in June.  I will have to get the weed eater to knock down parts of it by then before I can mow it. 

My mom reports that my dad wont mow areas that have wild flowers in the yard either.

Painted bunnies!!!!  Lucky you!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 26, 2021, 07:28:13 AM
The recent heavy rains have led to a yard not far from work having quite the collection of crawdads.  The crawdad mounds are as big as any I've ever seen.  I wouldn't want to meet one of those mudbugs except on a plate.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 26, 2021, 10:21:01 AM
Beneath a warm sky
Clover blooms shake in the breeze
A tiny jungle
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 27, 2021, 09:46:18 AM
I just saw either a grey fox, or a coyote in my backyard! We are in a semi-rural area, so I won't be too surprised it it happens to be a coyote.

On another note, this isn't good for the birds, since it was by the bird feeder.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on April 27, 2021, 03:40:39 PM
Quote
since it was by the bird feeder.

Arent these REALLY Critter Feeders?  By volume, I wonder if we dont end up filling up the rats, mice and squirrels (likely coons & opossum as well) than birds!
Ive seen squirrels take off the top of my dad's bird feeder, and then sit in the seeds and dig out all of the sun flower seeds, throwing the rest on the ground!  They get so used to you yelling at them that they wait until you are yards away before they bother to jump out and scramble waddle up a tree!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 27, 2021, 04:05:20 PM
Quote
since it was by the bird feeder.

Arent these REALLY Critter Feeders?  By volume, I wonder if we dont end up filling up the rats, mice and squirrels (likely coons & opossum as well) than birds!
Ive seen squirrels take off the top of my dad's bird feeder, and then sit in the seeds and dig out all of the sun flower seeds, throwing the rest on the ground!  They get so used to you yelling at them that they wait until you are yards away before they bother to jump out and scramble waddle up a tree!

I know. Squirrels drive me crazy because they are so destructive. I have to 'cage' all of my outside plants (or put mesh in the pots) so that the damn squirrels don't dig them up.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on April 27, 2021, 05:23:36 PM
I just saw either a grey fox, or a coyote in my backyard! We are in a semi-rural area, so I won't be too surprised it it happens to be a coyote.

On another note, this isn't good for the birds, since it was by the bird feeder.

Oh! That's so exciting! I hope it was a fox!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 27, 2021, 06:14:41 PM
I just saw either a grey fox, or a coyote in my backyard! We are in a semi-rural area, so I won't be too surprised it it happens to be a coyote.

On another note, this isn't good for the birds, since it was by the bird feeder.

Oh! That's so exciting! I hope it was a fox!

It was very exciting. As soon as we locked eyes- it took off!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on April 27, 2021, 07:59:16 PM
I just saw either a grey fox, or a coyote in my backyard! We are in a semi-rural area, so I won't be too surprised it it happens to be a coyote.

On another note, this isn't good for the birds, since it was by the bird feeder.

Oh! That's so exciting! I hope it was a fox!

It was very exciting. As soon as we locked eyes- it took off!

Cool! Coyotes are about twice the size of foxes, with much longer legs and a more dog-like appearance. If you look at side by side pictures you should be able to tell which it was.

We are making plans to go to the family cabin this summer, with various of us taking turns being there with my 92 year old grandma. This is relevant to the topic of foxes because she can't be dissuaded from feeding the local semi-tame foxes that make the rounds (my mother has tried to at least encourage feeding them things related to their natural diet, like grapes and meat, rather than, say, toast with jelly). No one was up there last summer so I wonder if they will have forgotten her, but they seem to know when cabins are occupied and add them back into their daily rounds. It is amazing how dog-like they have become-- they will come right up to the glass deck door and sit there with their head cocked to the side staring at you exactly like a dog begging for a treat. It really is kind of hard to resist that look.  Easy to see how canids got domesticated!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 27, 2021, 08:06:54 PM
I just saw either a grey fox, or a coyote in my backyard! We are in a semi-rural area, so I won't be too surprised it it happens to be a coyote.

On another note, this isn't good for the birds, since it was by the bird feeder.

Oh! That's so exciting! I hope it was a fox!

It was very exciting. As soon as we locked eyes- it took off!

Cool! Coyotes are about twice the size of foxes, with much longer legs and a more dog-like appearance. If you look at side by side pictures you should be able to tell which it was.

We are making plans to go to the family cabin this summer, with various of us taking turns being there with my 92 year old grandma. This is relevant to the topic of foxes because she can't be dissuaded from feeding the local semi-tame foxes that make the rounds (my mother has tried to at least encourage feeding them things related to their natural diet, like grapes and meat, rather than, say, toast with jelly). No one was up there last summer so I wonder if they will have forgotten her, but they seem to know when cabins are occupied and add them back into their daily rounds. It is amazing how dog-like they have become-- they will come right up to the glass deck door and sit there with their head cocked to the side staring at you exactly like a dog begging for a treat. It really is kind of hard to resist that look.  Easy to see how canids got domesticated!

Oh wow. I can't imagine having a fox as a daily visitor. Though I am tempted to put food out to see if it comes back.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on May 19, 2021, 10:19:09 PM
Saw a small squashed otter in the road this morning. But the road is several hundred meters up from the water, and several hundred meters back... maybe an eagle dropped it before it got squashed?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on May 22, 2021, 07:29:39 AM
I just saw either a grey fox, or a coyote in my backyard! We are in a semi-rural area, so I won't be too surprised it it happens to be a coyote.

On another note, this isn't good for the birds, since it was by the bird feeder.

Oh! That's so exciting! I hope it was a fox!

It was very exciting. As soon as we locked eyes- it took off!

Cool! Coyotes are about twice the size of foxes, with much longer legs and a more dog-like appearance. If you look at side by side pictures you should be able to tell which it was.

We are making plans to go to the family cabin this summer, with various of us taking turns being there with my 92 year old grandma. This is relevant to the topic of foxes because she can't be dissuaded from feeding the local semi-tame foxes that make the rounds (my mother has tried to at least encourage feeding them things related to their natural diet, like grapes and meat, rather than, say, toast with jelly). No one was up there last summer so I wonder if they will have forgotten her, but they seem to know when cabins are occupied and add them back into their daily rounds. It is amazing how dog-like they have become-- they will come right up to the glass deck door and sit there with their head cocked to the side staring at you exactly like a dog begging for a treat. It really is kind of hard to resist that look.  Easy to see how canids got domesticated!

I remember feeding a young fox Timbits from my car window. The fox just sat there and stared up with big eyes each time I thought he'd had enough.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 24, 2021, 07:19:18 AM
Saturday I was sitting on my patio after mowing the back yard and saw squirrels foraging.  One of them startled me by running right underneath the lawn lounge chair I was sitting on!  I watched it for some time as it perched on the rail around the patio, jumped in the grass and rooted around, and ate a nut or acorn it had found--all within a few feet of me.  I'm not used to being able to observe the squirrels around here at such close range.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 24, 2021, 07:29:01 AM
The one summer I tried to grow cherry tomatoes in a large tub on my back deck, there was a squirrel that reached though every chicken wire cage and plastic netting contraption I came up with; took one bite of the green fruit; and spat it out.

He often did this sitting on a rail a few feet from my head, just inside the rolling French doors, where I'd sit working on stuff. He seemed to like sneaking up, grabbing his spoils, and fixing me with one eye out of the side of his head, as if to be sure he'd gotten my attention.

Of course by the time I could scramble up and yell at him, he'd be gone ...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 24, 2021, 08:48:46 AM
The one summer I tried to grow cherry tomatoes in a large tub on my back deck, there was a squirrel that reached though every chicken wire cage and plastic netting contraption I came up with; took one bite of the green fruit; and spat it out.

He often did this sitting on a rail a few feet from my head, just inside the rolling French doors, where I'd sit working on stuff. He seemed to like sneaking up, grabbing his spoils, and fixing me with one eye out of the side of his head, as if to be sure he'd gotten my attention.

Of course by the time I could scramble up and yell at him, he'd be gone ...

M.

My grandmother would have shot him and turned him into dumplings.  If squirrels ate the vegetables she was raising for the family, she'd put them on the family's menu!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 24, 2021, 09:07:45 AM
Varmint control for a different time! (My great-uncle might have done something like that, in fact, from the stories we heard of him....)

Aren't they a bit gamey, though?

And in town as I am, I'd be worried about parasites and infections and so on....

But I do indeed understand the impulse.

Cheeky little critters....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on May 24, 2021, 09:25:47 AM
Vultures circle 'round.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 24, 2021, 10:20:23 AM
Varmint control for a different time! (My great-uncle might have done something like that, in fact, from the stories we heard of him....)

Aren't they a bit gamey, though?

And in town as I am, I'd be worried about parasites and infections and so on....

But I do indeed understand the impulse.

Cheeky little critters....

M.

I've found squirrel to be pretty palatable.  It does go better as the meat portion in a batch a dumplings, though.  I don't think squirrel is much of a risk for parasites and such.  There have been reports that eating squirrel brains can be hazardous.  Hardly anybody does that any longer.  It was an archaic practice even when my father was a boy.  He recalls his grandfather--my grandmother's step-father--sitting there with a plate of cooked squirrel heads, cracking their little noggins open like nuts.  Dad doesn't recall ever seeing anybody else do that.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on May 24, 2021, 11:44:52 AM
Just last week, I saw a news story about a centenarian+ who attributed his long life and health to squirrel brains.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on May 26, 2021, 08:25:07 AM
Two days ago, during my morning walk, I saw three rabbits eating breakfast on the lawn at a nearby church's daycare center entrance.

That wasn't the startling thing. This is what really surprised me: One of the rabbits let me get to within about two feet of it (!!!) before it decided I was too close and hopped away.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 26, 2021, 09:43:20 AM
Two days ago, during my morning walk, I saw three rabbits eating breakfast on the lawn at a nearby church's daycare center entrance.

That wasn't the startling thing. This is what really surprised me: One of the rabbits let me get to within about two feet of it (!!!) before it decided I was too close and hopped away.

That IS unusual!  I've sneaked fairly close to them before by freezing in place and then slowly getting closer, but not that close.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 26, 2021, 11:55:03 AM
SO and I have noticed, what appear to be dead honeybees, on the front porch most mornings for about the past two weeks. By accident, we observed these bees flying around the porch lights at night (11pm EST)! I did some quick googling and the reason they're out at night could be due to a nearby hive being able to see the light from the porch. SO and I tried turning on the lights much later (after dark) to hopefully, deter the bees from being attracted to the lights. We had fewer dead bees this morning, so maybe it worked? Anyone have thoughts on this? I don't want any more bees to die. :(
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on May 26, 2021, 02:17:05 PM
SO and I have noticed, what appear to be dead honeybees, on the front porch most mornings for about the past two weeks. By accident, we observed these bees flying around the porch lights at night (11pm EST)! I did some quick googling and the reason they're out at night could be due to a nearby hive being able to see the light from the porch. SO and I tried turning on the lights much later (after dark) to hopefully, deter the bees from being attracted to the lights. We had fewer dead bees this morning, so maybe it worked? Anyone have thoughts on this? I don't want any more bees to die. :(

Do you really need to have porch lights on at night? There are all sorts of reasons to try to reduce light pollution. If you have them for security, perhaps you could replace them with motion activated ones?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on May 27, 2021, 09:46:12 PM
Raccoons are pooping on our roof again.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 28, 2021, 02:54:49 AM
A turkey got up on our deck and faced down all three of the cats through the glass back door.  One charge and peck at the glass and the cats fled.  I didn't see them for a few hours.

That was one proud strutting Tom after that.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on May 28, 2021, 08:13:20 AM
SO and I have noticed, what appear to be dead honeybees, on the front porch most mornings for about the past two weeks. By accident, we observed these bees flying around the porch lights at night (11pm EST)! I did some quick googling and the reason they're out at night could be due to a nearby hive being able to see the light from the porch. SO and I tried turning on the lights much later (after dark) to hopefully, deter the bees from being attracted to the lights. We had fewer dead bees this morning, so maybe it worked? Anyone have thoughts on this? I don't want any more bees to die. :(

Do you really need to have porch lights on at night? There are all sorts of reasons to try to reduce light pollution. If you have them for security, perhaps you could replace them with motion activated ones?

We have motion-activated lights on the other side of the house. I think we'll try to turn the lights on well after dark and see if we continue to have improvement.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 03, 2021, 06:46:17 AM
4 young rabbits are playing tag on the lawn while the neighbour's  ragdoll cat watches malevolently.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 04, 2021, 08:05:27 AM
A remarkably tame-acting squirrel perched on my patio rail to eat a nut and left fragments of shell lying on my patio.  Not very good manners on the squirrel's part, but the entertainment was worth it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on June 04, 2021, 08:12:05 AM
I just had my first bear sighting of 2021.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on June 04, 2021, 09:13:31 AM
I just had my first bear sighting of 2021.

Neat!

A squirrel pulled the suet feeder down and started dragging it away. I ran outside to retrieve it before the squirrel could abscond with it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ab_grp on June 04, 2021, 09:29:39 AM
It would be neat to see a bear (from a distance!) while not in a park.  There was just one in my mom's area recently.  Was it a black bear?

Squirrels are little rascals.  Nice try!

I just received a neighborhood watch notification that a neighbor had been surprised to come upon a herd of black cows in the middle of the road in our neighborhood last night.  I also learned that cows have the right of way here.   Good things to know, I guess.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 04, 2021, 09:30:39 AM
I just had my first bear sighting of 2021.

You mean you can have multiple sightings in one year?  That's impressive!

Our pastor's wife was on a hunting stand last year when she saw a bear down below.  After it had left, she carefully got back to her vehicle.  While driving home she spotted a pair of game wardens meeting on the side of the road.  She stopped and asked if they could guess what she had just seen.  They had no trouble guessing that it was a bear.  She must have had that "just-saw-a-bear" look in her eyes.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on June 04, 2021, 09:40:45 AM
Yes, ab_grp, the bears in my area are black bears. And apl68, they’re quite common. We also get moose, fisher cats, and bobcats, but they’re less ubiquitous. Coyote are all over the place.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: arcturus on June 04, 2021, 11:06:56 AM
The cicadas are in full hum here. I keep thinking that there is one in the room with me, but I cannot find it.

In other fauna news: the local deer herd is doing well. Two new fawns were born last week in my backyard.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 05, 2021, 02:31:30 AM
Wow, the doe must have trusted you.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: downer on June 08, 2021, 04:55:30 AM
I've let half my yard become a meadow. It is getting to 4' tall now in spots. It's good for the butterflies and insects, and I think there's a rabbit living in there too. Some wildflowers, which are lovely.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 08, 2021, 05:39:42 AM
I've let half my yard become a meadow. It is getting to 4' tall now in spots. It's good for the butterflies and insects, and I think there's a rabbit living in there too. Some wildflowers, which are lovely.

Might you say more about your meadow?  I wanted to keep my 'yard' natural, but it is not at all 'meadowish.'
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: downer on June 08, 2021, 06:01:01 AM
I stopped mowing it about a year ago. I mow around next to the fences, so the neighbors will have fewer concerns. It seems to have all sorts of different grasses in it. I do nothing to it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 09, 2021, 06:49:03 AM
I stopped mowing it about a year ago. I mow around next to the fences, so the neighbors will have fewer concerns. It seems to have all sorts of different grasses in it. I do nothing to it.

Thanks.  If mine looked like a meadow, I wouldn't do anything to it, either.  Unfortunately, it is simply unsightly.  I leave mowing in the spring to very, very late because of bees.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: downer on June 09, 2021, 09:29:42 AM
I stopped mowing it about a year ago. I mow around next to the fences, so the neighbors will have fewer concerns. It seems to have all sorts of different grasses in it. I do nothing to it.

Thanks.  If mine looked like a meadow, I wouldn't do anything to it, either.  Unfortunately, it is simply unsightly.  I leave mowing in the spring to very, very late because of bees.

It might be a bit like men growing in a beard: there's a transitional phase where it doesn't look so great, but if you wait, it fills out.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 10, 2021, 05:11:36 AM
^Unrelated.

The birds and other critters (like the upstairs folks' dog) all started making noise a bit after 5 this AM.

I was up, reading and eating, but I didn't think to look outside.

Th3 birds usually start up at 4 AM (as verified from both ends of the candle under various circumstances). 

The doggie takes it into its head to yap anytime a raccoon, a squirrel, or a piece of paper blows through the yard.

So it wasn't until I was dressing for my every-other-AM walk (New! Recommended!) that I realized it was probably the halo eclipse that had stirred them, and I'd missed it.

Sic transit Solaris...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on June 29, 2021, 01:02:24 PM
Reviving this to say that a little tiny bunny baby has decided to enjoy the flowering clover at the top of the driveway ramp every lunchtime and evening.

(I know this because said bunny baby has been nibbling on it nearly every time I've returned home from an errand this past week.)

Hold out your hand. Now imagine a little fluffy animal fitting into your palm. That's the size of that tiny little bunny.

I'm glad that it at least knows to run like hell when I honk my horn--though weirdly, it doesn't move AT ALL until I do that.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 29, 2021, 02:43:31 PM
We have a film of me, age 3, holding a tiny little long-eared critter like that and being shown how to pet it carefully.

They're heart-melting, yes.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ciao_yall on June 29, 2021, 07:35:43 PM
Okay, kind of random addition but I was just remembering that up until the age of 6 I clearly remembered having seen dinosaurs at the zoo when I had been 3 or 4.

Yep. They were huge. A brontosaurus, most likely. Biggest things I had ever seen in my life. They were a bit far away. There was a little old lady standing next to me at the zoo, saying "marvelous." Very vivid.

When I learned they were extinct and there was no way I could have seen them in real life I was rather puzzled. "But..." Was it a dream? Most likely. But it was so.... real! And why would I have dreamt something like that?


Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on June 30, 2021, 05:02:04 AM
Okay, kind of random addition but I was just remembering that up until the age of 6 I clearly remembered having seen dinosaurs at the zoo when I had been 3 or 4.

Yep. They were huge. A brontosaurus, most likely. Biggest things I had ever seen in my life. They were a bit far away. There was a little old lady standing next to me at the zoo, saying "marvelous." Very vivid.

When I learned they were extinct and there was no way I could have seen them in real life I was rather puzzled. "But..." Was it a dream? Most likely. But it was so.... real! And why would I have dreamt something like that?
Giraffes?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 30, 2021, 06:14:06 AM
Okay, kind of random addition but I was just remembering that up until the age of 6 I clearly remembered having seen dinosaurs at the zoo when I had been 3 or 4.

Yep. They were huge. A brontosaurus, most likely. Biggest things I had ever seen in my life. They were a bit far away. There was a little old lady standing next to me at the zoo, saying "marvelous." Very vivid.

When I learned they were extinct and there was no way I could have seen them in real life I was rather puzzled. "But..." Was it a dream? Most likely. But it was so.... real! And why would I have dreamt something like that?
Giraffes?

We once had a staff member who took her little girl to the zoo and could not convince her that the dromedary camel wasn't a dinosaur.  They're bigger up close than people often expect them to be.  To a child they must seem absolutely enormous.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 30, 2021, 06:14:50 AM
Either that, or you're one of the lucky few who got to see Jurassic Park before the...unfortunate incidents shut them down.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on June 30, 2021, 09:55:28 AM
Quote
I clearly remembered having seen dinosaurs at the zoo when I had been 3 or 4.
Would you have been at the Calgary Zoo, by any chance? They have dinosaurs.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on June 30, 2021, 10:21:23 AM
So does the Alberta legislature.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on July 02, 2021, 12:38:18 AM
my earliest memories are from when I was very young.  We lived in a mobile home across the street from the Ocean in what was then fairly rural Florida.  i remember crabs as big as footballs.  They were blue land crabs, and I suppose that the footballs I remember were the footballs you would give a 3 year old!  (they would get under my peddle car). 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on July 10, 2021, 07:06:42 PM
Saw a trio of rabbits having dinner (of grass) in our neighbor's yard earlier this evening. I had to snap a pic on my iPhone!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on July 14, 2021, 06:52:58 PM
Went to the beach today and saw tens of thousands of dead mussels all washed up in a row along the high tide mark. Must be part of the post-heat-wave die-off here, which is estimated to have killed more than a billion of them. It was pretty horrifying.

And I saw a bald eagle, too.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 20, 2021, 07:25:44 AM
This morning a saw a tiny lizard trying to dash inside the building through the staff entrance in back.  As inside is not a safe environment for a lizard (And their presence tends to cause a certain amount of hysteria among staff members and patrons), I put my foot down to try to head it off and herd it back outside.  Instead I accidentally killed the poor little thing!  It makes for a sad start to a workday on what was already a very dreary day out.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on July 21, 2021, 05:33:05 AM
This morning a saw a tiny lizard trying to dash inside the building through the staff entrance in back.  As inside is not a safe environment for a lizard (And their presence tends to cause a certain amount of hysteria among staff members and patrons), I put my foot down to try to head it off and herd it back outside.  Instead I accidentally killed the poor little thing!  It makes for a sad start to a workday on what was already a very dreary day out.

Sorry.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 21, 2021, 05:57:32 AM
Aww.

Maybe some bird or other creature benefitted, though.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 21, 2021, 06:49:08 AM
Aww.

Maybe some bird or other creature benefitted, though.

M.

Well, I did toss it outside, so undoubtedly something is going to end up feasting on the remains.



I now have unwelcome fauna in my house that I'm trying to trap out.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on July 21, 2021, 09:04:20 AM
Saw a crow chasing a vulture.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 21, 2021, 10:04:32 AM
The unwelcome fauna is now out of the house.  It did not survive.  Things escalated in a way that I would rather had not happened.  I don't feel at this point like sharing further.  I'm just glad that I escaped injury myself.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on July 21, 2021, 11:26:04 AM
Too bad about the fauna, apl68.

I found what I think was a Brown Snake (common, nonvenomous) near my garage and moved it into the brush. Well, I know it wasn't a baby copperhead due to the lack of a bright yellow tail, etc. It pooped/musked me. I have been blessed by the Snake Gods. :P
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 21, 2021, 01:03:33 PM
Saw a crow chasing a vulture.

They HATE large raptors.

I was working on a paper once and hear a whole murder of them in the trees, yelling their heads off.

Turned out there was an owl sitting there, blinking quietly, turning its head about as if to say, "What's all the fuss about?"

Of course, if they hadn't chased it away, it might well have gone after their young in the nests, and they knew it.

The sudden quiet was deafening.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on July 21, 2021, 03:46:19 PM
Ants. Lots and lots of ants. Normally, we have lots and lots of ants outside, and I don't care. These ones are in the kitchen, and I do care.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: waterboy on July 22, 2021, 04:52:51 AM
One of the few benefits of being awake at 3 am is the weird call of a local screech owl coming through the window.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on July 22, 2021, 06:26:28 AM
After a dearth of butterfly sightings, I've seen both a zebra swallowtail and a giant swallowtail (plus assorted tiger swallowtails, monarchs, azures, red-spotted purples, admirals, sulfurs, and the ubiquitous cabbage whites) in the past week.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on July 23, 2021, 05:48:33 AM
Henri the canine cornered a groundhog (probably a yung'in) in a fence corner, and barked madly but didn't attack.  Henri the canine does not like rain, so I rained the hose on him until he fled to the porch, giving ground hog time to escape.  I think they live in a rock ledge just outside the fence.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: cathwen on July 23, 2021, 05:52:24 AM
Henri is a great name for a dog!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 23, 2021, 05:57:47 AM
I was thinking that.

Or a turtle....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Harlow2 on July 23, 2021, 06:21:49 AM
Ants. Lots and lots of ants. Normally, we have lots and lots of ants outside, and I don't care. These ones are in the kitchen, and I do care.

Here too.  Knocked many of them down fast with diatomaceous earth (pet friendly).  Still,some stragglers whose entry point I can’t find. Guess I need one of those trap things. I wonder if our very hot wet summer is contributing.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on July 23, 2021, 08:39:40 AM
Quote
Still,some stragglers whose entry point I can’t find.
After looking in all the usual places, I saw a couple coming out from the power outlet on the tile--which means they're in the wall, but I don't want to think about that.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Harlow2 on July 23, 2021, 11:31:52 AM
Me either. Ycch.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 23, 2021, 12:46:04 PM
What was it someone said they don't like, mint?

Can you stuff that in the wall?

(mostly kidding....)

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on July 24, 2021, 06:28:10 AM
I was thinking that.

Or a turtle....

M.

The turtle our dad rescued when we were children was named George.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 24, 2021, 08:55:31 AM
I was first thinking of Heloise's pet turtle from the childrens' book, but no, he was Skipperdee (where did I get "Henri" from?).

Bon p'tit chien, Henri.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 26, 2021, 07:22:31 AM
A staff member says that she had an encounter with a nest of yellow jackets while working out in her yard Saturday.  She wasn't sure for a while that she'd make it in today.  They got under her clothes, and prompted her to partially disrobe outside.  It was a traumatic experience.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on July 26, 2021, 12:11:52 PM
Spotted a deer wandering through a someone's yard next door to the library!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on August 08, 2021, 08:47:04 PM
Found a large chicken of the woods today.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: spork on August 09, 2021, 05:12:34 AM
Rabbits have been a daily presence in the backyard this year. Occasionally two will chase each other back and forth. It looks like they are playing. I am wondering if this is common behavior.

A few days ago before sunset I saw a juvenile possum in the bushes. It crawled into a downspout extension and sat there, peeking out, for about fifteen minutes. I tried to entice it out with some raspberries. But it was not interested, and eventually it left on its own accord. Haven't seen it again.

Finding lots of earthworms in the dirt, maybe because it's been a rainy summer.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on August 14, 2021, 08:41:54 PM
I found an Eastern Wormsnake and a Ringneck snake while cleaning up my backyard today.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on August 15, 2021, 02:19:49 AM
Ooh, neat, e_p_w!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Catherder on August 15, 2021, 07:06:33 AM
I found an Eastern Wormsnake and a Ringneck snake while cleaning up my backyard today.

There was a 2-foot long garter snake on my doorstep the other day. I told it I wouldn't step on it if it didn't try to enter the house.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on August 15, 2021, 09:24:41 AM
I found an Eastern Wormsnake and a Ringneck snake while cleaning up my backyard today.

There was a 2-foot long garter snake on my doorstep the other day. I told it I wouldn't step on it if it didn't try to enter the house.

A few years ago, I found a large (2-3 ft long? and at least an inch in girth) copperhead wrapped around the front porch railing like it was doing moves on a stripper pole. I swept it into a bucket (I know it was foolish) and gave it to one of my herpetology friends at work who relocated it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on August 16, 2021, 05:51:12 AM
Driving to town yesterday, I saw a young racoon wandering in the road.  Truck in front of me went around it.  I stopped and honked, but it just skittered around.  My guess is that it was sick or rabid.  Around here, no one to call about it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on August 17, 2021, 06:54:32 AM
I found a ginormous mantis yesterday (longer than my pointer finger, so about 4+ in. long) which made my day after having the bejeezus stung out of me.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 17, 2021, 09:02:37 AM
It stung you?

I didn't know they did that.

But yeah, they're cool....I found one once and took it home to release in my garden.

I figured it would eat stuff I didn't want....saw it a day later but not after that.

I hope something else didn't eat it, but I suspect it did.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on August 17, 2021, 10:46:49 AM
It stung you?

I didn't know they did that.

But yeah, they're cool....I found one once and took it home to release in my garden.

I figured it would eat stuff I didn't want....saw it a day later but not after that.

I hope something else didn't eat it, but I suspect it did.

M.

Sorry, I meant to say that some wasps stung me yesterday and finding that huge mantis (which I put in my garden) soothed the stings a little.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on August 17, 2021, 12:52:19 PM
Meanwhile, in North Little Rock an 85-pound tortoise has escaped from her home, been recaptured--and escaped again!

Quote
An 85-pound African spurred tortoise that escaped from her owner's backyard in North Little Rock on Thursday has been found.

Chelsea Hattaway said a neighbor who lives half a mile away called on Sunday after reading a newspaper article about Potato, her 14-year-old tortoise, being on the lam.The neighbor found Potato trying to cross the Young Road overpass over Interstate 40. He kept the tortoise in a shed for a couple of days before realizing who the owner was.

"She ate two watermelons while she was there," said Hattaway.

Hattaway said Potato escaped on Thursday by pushing through a gate that was loosely padlocked.

After being returned on Sunday, Potato did it again, pushing her way through another backyard gate that was supposed to be tied shut.

"We are looking now at replacing our entire fencing operations," said Hattaway.


More at:


https://www.nwaonline.com/news/2021/aug/17/85-pound-african-tortoise-makes-a-run-for-it/?news


She was found the second time on the side of Interstate 40, stopping traffic.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on August 23, 2021, 07:53:27 AM
Joy in the evening
Fireflies sparking here and there
Even as it rains
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 01, 2021, 06:16:18 AM
While I walk along
A crunching beneath my foot
A spent cicada
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 01, 2021, 03:53:40 PM
Has anyone ever eaten Creeping Cucumber (Melothria pendula)? They're growing wild on our campus and delicious!

Careful- only eat the light green ones.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on September 01, 2021, 08:03:47 PM
Saw a grey whale from the ferry this afternoon, which was exciting!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 02, 2021, 07:11:33 AM
Saw a grey whale from the ferry this afternoon, which was exciting!

Congratulations on your sighting!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on September 11, 2021, 09:43:49 AM
Saw a beautiful male Eastern box turtle in my backyard this morning (it's a pretty rustic/woodsy yard).
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 11, 2021, 02:54:43 PM
No swans (although they must be around because there's freshly plucked white feathers in one of the areas where they make their bedding) and I think the geese have mostly migrated away.

Several ducks here and there, but not in their usual places from the summer.

But I saw the juvenile heron I've seen before, first flying under the bridge (the Nathaniel Parker/Neil Dudgeon film "Piece of Cake" comes to mind) and later out on a sandspit doing his rotary hard-stare thing.

And before this AM I'd never ever seen a black heron.

That was cool.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on September 12, 2021, 06:31:40 AM
M.....This:  black heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ??
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 12, 2021, 06:57:59 AM
M.....This:  black heron (Egretta ardesiaca) ??

I think so.

No wingspreading going on, but the silhouette is right.

Thanks!

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on September 17, 2021, 07:04:47 AM
I just saw a bear wandering across the road — we both gave each other a long stare.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 17, 2021, 09:42:02 AM
I just saw a bear wandering across the road — we both gave each other a long stare.

Jaw-drop.

Also, this children's song comes to mind, glad it's not what happened to you!

   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdmV7VFDWqk

;--}

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 17, 2021, 10:19:23 AM
Wild hogs have invaded Mom and Dad's property.  Fortunately they have had no face-to-face encounters so far.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 17, 2021, 11:27:43 AM
Yikes, those are scary beasts.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Wahoo Redux on September 17, 2021, 08:20:28 PM
An owl.

Sitting on an unlit barbeque in the park.

Looked at us. Unconcerned.  Swiveled her head.

Two stoned college students staring at her.  Smiling.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on September 19, 2021, 03:38:38 PM
Saw a big black bear crossing the road yesterday, two vultures atop telephone poles today, and a pod of orcas from the ferry today.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 19, 2021, 05:57:48 PM
Three turkeys, a woodchuck, and several scurrying chipmunks and squirrels all together.  When Smolt "spread" the seed yesterday. she must've choked down on the bag...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on September 24, 2021, 04:06:31 AM
On my morning walk today: three rabbits and one fox. A great horned owl was inferred via some characteristic hooting in the distance.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 02, 2021, 07:27:50 AM
During a hike, on a short vacation a week ago, I came across the most amazing echo I've ever encountered.  I had found it during a hike several years back, and was able to find the same spot.  That echo will return as many as five or six syllables, perfectly.  It ought to have a sign to mark it, so that more people can know it's there.  Plus that sign would look friendlier than the "No Camping" sign that already sits there.

It's a lovely spot on a lake inlet, with a steep, wooded bank on the other side.  There's a hike-in camp area nearby.  The morning was clear and mild.  There was nobody else at that spot while I was there, except for a passing lake kayaker.  A perfect place for impromptu worship.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 15, 2021, 07:30:32 AM
Yesterday evening I was driving through the neighborhood on my way to a meeting outside of town when a squirrel ran in front of me.  I tried to slow down to miss it.  But in its fear and confusion it ended up running right under my wheels.  I could see in my rear-view mirror that I had struck it.  I made a block and came back by.  It was dead by then.  At least it didn't suffer for long.

I'm not sentimental about squirrels.  I ate squirrel dumplings for supper at some friends' house just the other evening.  But that squirrel died for a reason.  Its role in the system of nature was to eventually be killed and eaten by some other creature.  Just getting run over by accident was a senseless waste.  It felt even worse when I discovered that the meeting had been cancelled, and I didn't even need to be driving that evening in the first place. 

So often we blunder around wrecking things when we don't even mean to.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on October 15, 2021, 08:25:34 AM
Yesterday evening I was driving through the neighborhood on my way to a meeting outside of town when a squirrel ran in front of me.  I tried to slow down to miss it.  But in its fear and confusion it ended up running right under my wheels.  I could see in my rear-view mirror that I had struck it.  I made a block and came back by.  It was dead by then.  At least it didn't suffer for long.

I'm not sentimental about squirrels.  I ate squirrel dumplings for supper at some friends' house just the other evening.  But that squirrel died for a reason.  Its role in the system of nature was to eventually be killed and eaten by some other creature.  Just getting run over by accident was a senseless waste.  It felt even worse when I discovered that the meeting had been cancelled, and I didn't even need to be driving that evening in the first place. 

So often we blunder around wrecking things when we don't even mean to.

Maybe it was intended to be eaten by vultures or maybe crows. On another note, someone hit a deer weeks ago and the body was left on the side of the road. It was skeletonized in a few days, so something ate it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on October 15, 2021, 09:46:28 AM
A friend in another state, a minister, created a deer harvesting collect/community-butchering program for road-kill.

The animals were picked up within a very few hours of being hit and processed for meat to be sent to the shelters and feeding programs in the area.

The state police knew to call them once the animal had been cleared for pickup and the venison was prepared in  USDA-approved facilities.

Since it was a heavily forested area with many unthinking visitors roaring through, it was at least a way to transform the situation to something more positive.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 15, 2021, 11:02:59 AM
A friend in another state, a minister, created a deer harvesting collect/community-butchering program for road-kill.

The animals were picked up within a very few hours of being hit and processed for meat to be sent to the shelters and feeding programs in the area.

The state police knew to call them once the animal had been cleared for pickup and the venison was prepared in  USDA-approved facilities.

Since it was a heavily forested area with many unthinking visitors roaring through, it was at least a way to transform the situation to something more positive.

M.

Sounds like a good project.  Around here I think enterprising individuals tend to get there first whenever a deer or hog perishes on the road.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: kaysixteen on October 15, 2021, 10:26:08 PM
Remind me what squirrel tastes like?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on October 16, 2021, 06:02:01 AM
Remind me what squirrel tastes like?

Chicken ~:)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 16, 2021, 06:22:17 AM
Remind me what squirrel tastes like?

Chicken ~:)

No...I wouldn't say that.  As with chicken, you can make some good dumplings with them.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on October 16, 2021, 06:26:02 AM
Tastes like Chipmunk
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on October 16, 2021, 12:11:45 PM
On my walk this AM, I found half a grey, dried-up pelt, and then a pretty, bushy part of squirrel tail, a bit further down the sidewalk.

I'm guessing an owl, hawk, or other large bird dined on squirrel last night. I suspect no dumplings were involved.

Whatever it was also left a half-digested slug to wander around on the same square in the sidewalk until it, too, died.

After photographing them as forensic evidence, I moved all these signs of carnage under the bushes in the garden abutting the sidewalk since I couldn't properly bury them.

Nature red in tooth and claw, and all that....

RIP, all small critters.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on October 16, 2021, 12:22:48 PM
Quote
Remind me what squirrel tastes like?

It really depends on what they have been eating.

In my youth, I would quail hunt with my grandfather, and we had feeders set up.  One particular feeder was near an oak tree, but the squirrels much preferred the corn.  One day we were able to harvest 4 of those corn fed ones, and let me tell you, they were mighty tasty!  Very much like chicken (though it also depends on how it was cooked).

In PhD school, I visited my Great Aunt and she had a lot of hickory trees on her property. I harvested several squirrels from that property, but they had been eating green hickory nuts, and they had a very strong taste, not pleasant taste. 

The answer then depends on How you Cook Them, and what they had been eating. 

Similarly, grass fed beef is supposed to have a different taste than other (feed lot ) beef. 

Also, Catfish....  I have had wild catfish that made me think that I was NOT a fan.  But my Great Aunt (mentioned above) had a catfish pond and those corn/feed fed fish were damn good!    Mississippi used to have a lot of catfish farms (I dont know if they still do or not,) but those factory fish were much better than the wild caught ones, though I also admit that the species were different, so that may have something to do with it too.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on October 16, 2021, 01:24:57 PM
You're making me wonder about eels, now.

They were a staple in some medieval diets, and I've always wondered how anyone could stand them.

But maybe it depended on what they ate, too.

Hmmmmm.....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on October 17, 2021, 07:37:59 PM
Continuing to hear at least one great horned owl and see multiple rabbits and squirrels on my morning walks. Also, the chipmunk in the backyard is still scurrying around, but I haven’t seen any foxes or hawks in a while.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: namazu on October 18, 2021, 01:29:55 AM
Had our third snake sighting of the year, a day after the second snake sighting.  The last two sightings were in the same location, but different snakes!  (All garter snakes so far.  Have previously seen rat snakes and milk snakes here, too.)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on October 18, 2021, 09:08:51 AM
For several years, a jackrabbit spent a lot of time sitting in our potato patch. I noticed he hadn't been around, and then found his feet in the back garden--bobcat, I assume. RIP PPR (Potato Patch Rabbit).
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on October 29, 2021, 04:39:48 AM
I had my first ever bobcat sighting yesterday -- pretty neat!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on October 29, 2021, 07:23:14 AM
I had my first ever bobcat sighting yesterday -- pretty neat!

Congratulations!  They're a very rare sight.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: cathwen on October 29, 2021, 08:18:51 AM
Wow!  My state is supposed to be full of bobcats, but I’ve never seen one.  I’m a little envious!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on November 01, 2021, 07:20:36 AM
This morning around dawn I heard a big splash in the pond at the city park.  A beaver?  Later, while walking along the other side of the pond, I saw a good-sized tree with an unmistakable beaver cut in it.  It's about to come down now.  The timber in the park has suffered a good deal in recent years from storms, droughts, a plague of nutria rats, etc.  The city needs to trap out the beavers before they do more damage.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 02, 2021, 03:25:40 PM
Wow, a bobcat!

I saw an enole on a tree today.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 05, 2021, 10:19:11 PM
Many feral goats today.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 06, 2021, 10:23:29 AM
Two hawks.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on November 08, 2021, 07:22:26 AM
Yesterday evening one of the teens in our church youth group said that she had spent much of the day at the family deer stand without seeing any game.  All she saw was a coyote.  One of the others present told her that she should have shot the coyote, because they make good tacos.  You learn something new every day.

She didn't believe him.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 09, 2021, 12:18:12 AM
Two hawks.

Same hawks, plus a sea turtle.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Harlow2 on November 09, 2021, 03:59:17 PM
An extremely portly ground hog. At a park, not my house.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 09, 2021, 04:37:27 PM
Oh, dear....I have this picture of a little roly-poly figure waddling along with short legs that barely reach the ground anymore...

He must be making out with the pickings in his area...or--thought--is it a female expecting kits?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on November 10, 2021, 12:42:03 PM
My husband captured video of three deer leaping across a bike/walking/jogging path yesterday at the local Revolutionary War battleground park.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 10, 2021, 03:37:40 PM
The hatchling and I just went for our daily walk through the woods, and our paths crossed a great horned owl.

9h, and one banana slug.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on November 13, 2021, 04:30:43 AM
A somewhat confused chipmunk climbed up and down a screen.  I'm not sure whether it wanted in the house or just didn't like the birds feeding at the feeders on the porch.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 13, 2021, 05:02:23 AM
The hatchling and I just went for our daily walk through the woods, and our paths crossed a great horned owl.

9h, and one banana slug.

What's 9h?

9 herons, or....?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on November 14, 2021, 04:56:47 AM
Dog barking madly on porch as I am removing bird feeders a bit after dark.  Finally realize the raccoon which I know loves bird seed and will empty feeders is on porch rail with little paws clasped around post.  Dog will not come in with R on porch.  I get flashlight (porch light burned out).  R still won't move.  I get looooong stick and poke.  R hisses, dog continues to bark madly.  R won't move.  I decide photo is in order, and when I get back out with phone, turns out there are TWO raccoons, Big Mamma R and Little R.  Photo taken and posted to FB.  Finally, after lots of persuasion, canine induced to come inside.  I'm barefooted and my feet are freezing.

Quiet ensues.

Moral of this story is that I must remember to bring in bird feeders before dark.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on November 14, 2021, 09:13:26 AM
Raccoons are scary.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 14, 2021, 10:56:09 AM
Raccoons are scary.

Especially when procreation at 2 AM in the willow tree in your back yard.

Right outside your bedroom window.

And clearly at least one took the mantra from the days of sexual liberation, "Make noise!" to heart.

Probably both.

Just get it over and go to sleep, guys.

So I can.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on November 14, 2021, 11:36:46 AM
I was out for a jog in the dark the other evening (because everything after work is now in the dark), when into the beam of my running light trotted a small skunk. Luckily it was unperturbed and kept right on trotting across the path and into the trees on the other side.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 14, 2021, 12:56:40 PM
I think I posted this on the old forum:

When I went to my students' homes, I would walk to one of them from the bus stop, a block away. They lived near a playground and woods that had critters (including, at the other end, the woods near where I lived where the abovementioned raccoons cavorted).

In that block there was a very friendly black-and-white cat, named Sam.

Sam liked to sit on one of the gatepost tops and get people to pet him. He would also wrap himself around your ankles if you happened to cross 'his' driveway. There were signs all over the neighborhood reminding people it was fine to pet Sam, he was very friendly, but please don't feed him because he had some dietary issues, was getting to be an older kitty, etc.

So one afternoon, it was starting to get dark, and I was walking along the sidewalk near Sam's house and a black-and white furry creature came into view.

I had nearly bent down to pet it when I realized it wasn't Sam...and kept going.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Langue_doc on November 14, 2021, 03:16:43 PM
Speaking of raccoons...

About ten years or so ago, I was coming home from my usual walk when I saw people on both sides of the road, staring at the second floor of a house. I heard someone say "his eyes are red", so I stopped to see who the red eyes belonged to. There was a raccoon peeping out of a hole in the faux-stone siding; a few minutes later, another raccoon joined the first one. Soon after, the siding was replaced, and the house seems to have changed hands several times subsequently. I still refer to this house as "the raccoon house".
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 14, 2021, 03:19:44 PM
They have such cute little faces, don't they?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on November 14, 2021, 05:44:11 PM
A raccoon got into someone's house in Stafford Co., VA over the weekend:
https://wtop.com/stafford-county/2021/11/masked-intruder-raccoon-apprehended-by-stafford-co-deputies/ (https://wtop.com/stafford-county/2021/11/masked-intruder-raccoon-apprehended-by-stafford-co-deputies/)
Posted on WTOP online 11/14/21
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on November 15, 2021, 04:46:30 AM
A raccoon got into someone's house in Stafford Co., VA over the weekend:
https://wtop.com/stafford-county/2021/11/masked-intruder-raccoon-apprehended-by-stafford-co-deputies/ (https://wtop.com/stafford-county/2021/11/masked-intruder-raccoon-apprehended-by-stafford-co-deputies/)
Posted on WTOP online 11/14/21

Humor for my day!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Langue_doc on November 17, 2021, 03:30:10 PM
Raccoons are the latest fare-beaters in NYC.

Quote
Raccoon Spotted Trying To Enter LIC Subway Station, Video Shows


Here is the picture of the raccoon entering the station; I couldn't find the video.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CWYYza2glZI/

Here is the article:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/raccoon-spotted-trying-to-enter-lic-subway-station-video-shows/ar-AAQPaeO?cvid=f5cf9fc95d1f4e8e9a114a960d0357c4&ocid=winp1taskbar

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 29, 2021, 11:45:15 AM
I offered a buck a kale leaf this morning, which it ate. It did not like it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on November 29, 2021, 12:12:57 PM
I offered a buck a kale leaf this morning, which it ate. It did not like it.

The buck, or the kale leaf?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on November 29, 2021, 12:15:01 PM
I offered a buck a kale leaf this morning, which it ate. It did not like it.

The buck, or the kale leaf?

Good question...
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on November 29, 2021, 12:47:27 PM
Yesterday evening I heard repeated animal bellowing sounds wafting across our neighborhood well into the night.  A bull moose?  An elephant seal?  Or just another of the local dogs in a discontented mood?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 29, 2021, 03:59:18 PM
Do you actually have moose and seals nearby?

That might help to rule out some of the options...

;--}

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on November 30, 2021, 06:14:37 AM
Maybe Moose and Squirrel?

Natasha, prepare the trap!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on November 30, 2021, 06:45:38 AM
Maybe Moose and Squirrel?

Natasha, prepare the trap!

Yes!

   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BdfuF7oD-M

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on November 30, 2021, 07:23:49 AM
Plenty of squirrels (Even a few flying squirrels!), no moose or seals that I know of.  Which suggests that it was probably a dog--but he sounded more like a moose or seal bellowing than a regular dog howling.  Some dogs have weird sounds come out when they try to howl.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: aside on December 21, 2021, 09:01:02 AM
Five deer crossing the road near my house, at the "deer crossing" sign.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on December 21, 2021, 01:18:01 PM
Five deer crossing the road near my house, at the "deer crossing" sign.

They know how to be pedestrians!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on March 18, 2022, 07:19:05 AM
We've had some serious rain for the first time in quite a long while, and the spring frogs are out in force!  I heard frog music everywhere I walked this morning.  Some of it came from places where there seemed to be barely any puddles for them to be sitting in.  An abundance of frogs is said to be a good environmental sign, so all the creaking and croaking and peeping is good. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on March 18, 2022, 07:29:32 AM
Our family used to attend the annual "Work Weekend" at the Camp Fire camp my sister and I attended for many years. Each family was housed in a different cabin, so there was plenty of room.

One year, our younger brothers each asked to bring a friend, to have someone to play with. My folks agreed and they and the friends' families worked out the arrangements for transport from our more urban homes to the camp.

One of the kids had apparently never been out of the city. On arriving at night, and being greeting by the cacophony apl68 describes, complete with shrill peepers, mid-range croakers, and the occasional full-throated bull-frog dropping a deep bass "BOof!" into the din, the 8-year old got out of the car with a surprised look on his face.

He looked around apprehensively, as if he were thinking of getting back in the car.

Then he turned to my mom, gulped, and said, "Boy, this sure is a NOISY place!"

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on March 28, 2022, 04:27:09 PM
Looks like we need to fix our compost bin. I just looked out the window and this is the second time I've seen a squirrel eating the stem of a lettuce that we threw in there.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on March 28, 2022, 05:37:09 PM
Quote
Looks like we need to fix our compost bin. I just looked out the window and this is the second time I've seen a squirrel eating the stem of a lettuce that we threw in there.

It may be less work to change the name to Squirrel Salad Bar!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on March 29, 2022, 09:39:14 AM
Quote
Looks like we need to fix our compost bin. I just looked out the window and this is the second time I've seen a squirrel eating the stem of a lettuce that we threw in there.

It may be less work to change the name to Squirrel Salad Bar!
This squirrel enjoys coffee:
https://www.gocomics.com/speedbump/2022/03/28 (https://www.gocomics.com/speedbump/2022/03/28)
From "Speed Bump" syndicated daily comic 3/28/22
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 11, 2022, 07:41:36 AM
Admiring the lake
I saw it and overlooked
The blooming dogwood
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 12, 2022, 10:23:23 AM
By the moonlit shore
Two deer have come for water
One sound makes them flee
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on April 21, 2022, 07:26:42 AM
Given the beauty of the haiku written by apl68, I am almost hesitant to post.  Having been in Winter Quarters for several months, I returned to my mountain abode to evidence of meece, which the lack thereof would be surprising.  Fortunately, it was not much, no orgies apparently.

However,  after being home for a day or so, I wandered into the guest bathroom....to discover that a little meece had committed suicide by drowning in the toilet.  Ugh.

Then I discovered that it must have been starving as I found evidence that it had gnawed on a candle and gnawed into a plastic jar of cumin.  Yes, cumin.

A far cry, however, from the year of the 13 meece.  And last year there were only three.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 21, 2022, 07:35:03 AM
Given the beauty of the haiku written by apl68, I am almost hesitant to post.  Having been in Winter Quarters for several months, I returned to my mountain abode to evidence of meece, which the lack thereof would be surprising.  Fortunately, it was not much, no orgies apparently.

However,  after being home for a day or so, I wandered into the guest bathroom....to discover that a little meece had committed suicide by drowning in the toilet.  Ugh.

Then I discovered that it must have been starving as I found evidence that it had gnawed on a candle and gnawed into a plastic jar of cumin.  Yes, cumin.

A far cry, however, from the year of the 13 meece.  And last year there were only three.


Well...nature's not always pretty.  Which haiku sometimes acknowledge, by the way.

The new mountain green
Did not prepare me to find
A mouse in the john
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on April 22, 2022, 04:45:34 AM
Given the beauty of the haiku written by apl68, I am almost hesitant to post.  Having been in Winter Quarters for several months, I returned to my mountain abode to evidence of meece, which the lack thereof would be surprising.  Fortunately, it was not much, no orgies apparently.

However,  after being home for a day or so, I wandered into the guest bathroom....to discover that a little meece had committed suicide by drowning in the toilet.  Ugh.

Then I discovered that it must have been starving as I found evidence that it had gnawed on a candle and gnawed into a plastic jar of cumin.  Yes, cumin.

A far cry, however, from the year of the 13 meece.  And last year there were only three.


Well...nature's not always pretty.  Which haiku sometimes acknowledge, by the way.

The new mountain green
Did not prepare me to find
A mouse in the john

I will be giggling on and off all day!!   That is hilarious!!!!  Thank you!!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 22, 2022, 05:02:54 AM
+1

;--}

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on April 22, 2022, 07:17:27 AM
The lodge lights are bright
When I step away from them
I can see the stars
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: AmLitHist on April 22, 2022, 10:25:51 AM
While pulling weeds and cleaning the last remnants of dead leaves from around my penestemon and lamb's ears, I lifted up a handful of mess to put into the lawn waste bag. In a split second, I realized that the extremely long fat earthworm was not, and instead was a foot-long slender gray snake. 

I hate snakes (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dL3ZIc5IL2w&ab_channel=tadsexington91583). I didn't scream, but I did throw the whole handful to the ground and got ALHS from around the corner of the house; he took the grabber tool and carried the snake to the grass by the side of the street, after making me take a picture of it with his phone and after acting like he was going to toss the snake on me. He's lucky I didn't deck him in the front yard with all the neighbors watching.

I'm truly not the hysterical type, but <<shudder>>.  I hate snakes, with apologies to the snake lovers here.  <<shudder>>
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on April 22, 2022, 11:01:22 AM
While pulling weeds and cleaning the last remnants of dead leaves from around my penestemon and lamb's ears, I lifted up a handful of mess to put into the lawn waste bag. In a split second, I realized that the extremely long fat earthworm was not, and instead was a foot-long slender gray snake. 

I hate snakes (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dL3ZIc5IL2w&ab_channel=tadsexington91583). I didn't scream, but I did throw the whole handful to the ground and got ALHS from around the corner of the house; he took the grabber tool and carried the snake to the grass by the side of the street, after making me take a picture of it with his phone and after acting like he was going to toss the snake on me. He's lucky I didn't deck him in the front yard with all the neighbors watching.

I'm truly not the hysterical type, but <<shudder>>.  I hate snakes, with apologies to the snake lovers here.  <<shudder>>
What kind of snake? I'm sure that makes a difference in attitude.

Where I grew up there were no venomous snakes, just garter snakes, which I spent many happy summer days catching and releasing with the neighbors kids.

A number of years ago, my parents were having landscape work done, and the guy operating the mini backhoe dug up a nest of many hibernating garter snakes. My mother was alerted to this fact by the big burly landscaper standing on the seat of the mini backhoe and screaming repeatedly. She took great joy in telling him not to worry, she'd take care of them, then calmly scooping up the whole pile of snakes in her arms and moving them to the field. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on April 22, 2022, 02:23:14 PM
While pulling weeds and cleaning the last remnants of dead leaves from around my penestemon and lamb's ears, I lifted up a handful of mess to put into the lawn waste bag. In a split second, I realized that the extremely long fat earthworm was not, and instead was a foot-long slender gray snake. 

I hate snakes (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dL3ZIc5IL2w&ab_channel=tadsexington91583). I didn't scream, but I did throw the whole handful to the ground and got ALHS from around the corner of the house; he took the grabber tool and carried the snake to the grass by the side of the street, after making me take a picture of it with his phone and after acting like he was going to toss the snake on me. He's lucky I didn't deck him in the front yard with all the neighbors watching.

I'm truly not the hysterical type, but <<shudder>>.  I hate snakes, with apologies to the snake lovers here.  <<shudder>>
What kind of snake? I'm sure that makes a difference in attitude.

Where I grew up there were no venomous snakes, just garter snakes, which I spent many happy summer days catching and releasing with the neighbors kids.

A number of years ago, my parents were having landscape work done, and the guy operating the mini backhoe dug up a nest of many hibernating garter snakes. My mother was alerted to this fact by the big burly landscaper standing on the seat of the mini backhoe and screaming repeatedly. She took great joy in telling him not to worry, she'd take care of them, then calmly scooping up the whole pile of snakes in her arms and moving them to the field.

I'm sorry, but that is a funny image. I caught a copperhead at my house (I know- very foolish) using a bucket (and a long broom!) and gave it to my herpetologist friends to relocate. SO HAAAAATTTTEEEESSSS snakes, so he's right there with you ALH, and it's hard when I find a cute DeKay's in the backyard and want to share it with someone. He tolerates my behavior. :)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Juvenal on April 22, 2022, 04:00:31 PM
The cat on the lawn
And bird on the grass.
A feather on the door mat.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on April 22, 2022, 07:59:50 PM
I was hoping to see cetaceans this evening, but instead it was a pile of eagles, vultures, cormorants, geese, and a seal.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on April 22, 2022, 08:47:29 PM
I spent the morning trying to get video of spawning damselfish, but was mostly thwarted by (other) Neoprene Apes (Homo scubaquaticus).

Still, I've seen Mantas, dolphins, 3 kinds of eels, 4 kinds of spawning damselfish (including potential video proof of a suspected hybridization), lots of other popular marine species, and one novice Neoprene Ape - now named SeaSmolt.

Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on April 23, 2022, 05:59:54 AM
The cat on the lawn
And bird on the grass.
A feather on the door mat.


My critters generally leave more than a mere feather.  Either half digested vomit or eviscerated corpse. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 23, 2022, 06:09:07 AM
I spent the morning trying to get video of spawning damselfish, but was mostly thwarted by (other) Neoprene Apes (Homo scubaquaticus).

Still, I've seen Mantas, dolphins, 3 kinds of eels, 4 kinds of spawning damselfish (including potential video proof of a suspected hybridization), lots of other popular marine species, and one novice Neoprene Ape - now named SeaSmolt.

Wonder if teaching SeaSmolt to do the camera work would net you a few good photos?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on April 23, 2022, 12:37:39 PM
I spent the morning trying to get video of spawning damselfish, but was mostly thwarted by (other) Neoprene Apes (Homo scubaquaticus).

Still, I've seen Mantas, dolphins, 3 kinds of eels, 4 kinds of spawning damselfish (including potential video proof of a suspected hybridization), lots of other popular marine species, and one novice Neoprene Ape - now named SeaSmolt.

Wonder if teaching SeaSmolt to do the camera work would net you a few good photos?

M.

All in good time.  I'm playing the long game here.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on April 23, 2022, 01:42:59 PM
;--》

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on May 08, 2022, 06:40:39 AM
Double posted in bird thread:

 Raccoons are back, so must remove feeders from back porch at night.  They never clean out the feeders on the front porch or in the yard......selective!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on May 19, 2022, 10:22:44 AM
Grey treefrog has taken up daytime residence in a potted plant!  I found that out when I moved the pot, and - later that evening - got to watch the graceful leap to the patio wall, followed by a climb up the tree.  Frog was back in the pot this morning, so I put it back in the previous location.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 24, 2022, 07:31:49 AM
There must have been an insect hatch this AM, the edges of the river were popping with little explosions, followed by V-trails, on the surface.

I finally found a spot between the lower tree branches, the reflecting sunlight, and the quivery water where I could see the fish that were making all the ruckus.

It was murky, but a bit of the video may yet show them: 4-5 inches long, maybe 3/4" wide, whitish-grey--the right range for brokeback herring, but too swift to call for sure.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: hmaria1609 on May 24, 2022, 07:35:55 PM
Saw a deer eating breakfast in someone's front yard on the way to the library
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: bacardiandlime on May 25, 2022, 02:03:25 AM
Saw a deer eating breakfast in someone's front yard on the way to the library

I misread this as "saw a deer eating someone's breakfast" and immediately thought the deer was going to town on a bagel and a coffee.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: ohnoes on May 25, 2022, 05:44:29 AM
Saw a deer eating breakfast in someone's front yard on the way to the library

I misread this as "saw a deer eating someone's breakfast" and immediately thought the deer was going to town on a bagel and a coffee.

That's ridiculous.  They prefer doe-nuts - if buckwheat pancakes aren't available.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 25, 2022, 07:10:03 AM
This thread is doe-ling out more and more pun-ishment...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on May 25, 2022, 07:10:52 AM
Saw a deer eating breakfast in someone's front yard on the way to the library

I misread this as "saw a deer eating someone's breakfast" and immediately thought the deer was going to town on a bagel and a coffee.

Not so funny to those who raise gardens that are decimated by deer.  I know somebody who has already experienced a good deal of deer damage this spring.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 25, 2022, 02:02:20 PM
I have been teaching a summer wildlife biology class for nigh on two decades, and in that time we have NEVER caught a rabbit (despite working with one of the experts and putting out hundreds of traps).

Yesterday, two of my students and I hand-caught an [u=https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Hpc9sbJQGIXzVLFa6C3TgZ7aJPTfgAxa/view?usp=sharing]eastern cottontail baby[/u].

Today, we caught a white footed mouse and I proceeded to show my students how NOT to hold wildlife.

1) Reach into trap, and corner critter.
2) firmly (but gently) hold critter and bring out of trap. 
3) Secure critter by scruff (if possible) or tail (if not)
4) If by tail, then scruff.
5) Do NOT allow critter to BITE at 1, or 2, or 3, or 4.


FAIL at 1, 2, 3, AND 4.  Little bugger even drew blood.

But HOW, you ask, surely you have students wear gloves and you do so as well?

Yes, and yes, usually.

Sometimes you best serve by being a bad example....


Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Juvenal on May 25, 2022, 02:36:42 PM
Years back when I was teaching (?) a basic "Field Biology" course on campus, and we were in a micro-wood on campus, we (I) were (was) astonished to see--in this tiny plot--a hawk (ID not clear--probably Sharp-shinned) stoop down to the ground a few trees off and carry away (lunch date) what was likely a Short-tailed Shrew.  I'd (I've) never seen (since) a bird of prey take prey.  Bon appetite!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 25, 2022, 03:34:07 PM
I saw a huge one swoop down and lift off with a rabbit once, bloody and dripping, just as I was coming up to the top of a historic knoll.

I also saw a smaller (red-tail, I think) pick up a chipmunk and take off with it. Slightly less bloody, but still...

Mixed feelings: Very interesting, nature red in tooth and claw (and beak) and all that....

On the other hand--I don't eat my lunch in front of them, I'd appreciate it if they'd return the favor...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on May 25, 2022, 05:58:46 PM
Prior to the building of the fancy-schmancy "wellness center", I could see the rooftop of the old gym, where the red-tailed hawks would carry and devour their prey.  Good times.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on May 25, 2022, 06:30:19 PM
On the more hopeful side of the situation, six grey-beige goslings with their folks grazing by the riverside...they posed for a photo-op, then went back to selecting grass, blade by blade, as they'd been taught.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: sinenomine on June 04, 2022, 06:01:04 AM
Driving through a neighboring town early this morning, I was obliged to stop at a crosswalk by the library for a squirrel, which very carefully crossed on the painted lines. I had to chuckle!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on June 04, 2022, 02:03:35 PM
I appear to have brushed up on some poison ivy, oak, or sumac. My right arm is all welted. Sigh.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: clean on June 04, 2022, 03:05:57 PM
Quote
I appear to have brushed up on some poison ivy, oak, or sumac. My right arm is all welted. Sigh.

benedryl?  Oatmeal baths?  Caladryl lotion?

All of the above? 

(The last time I had a HUGE reaction to it I was put on a week's long Zpack steriod .... I went to a Doc in the Box (walk in clinic). He asked what the problem was. I pulled up my shirt to expose the welts, and he kicked back on his wheeled stool so that he was at the other end of the room, and that is where he did his examination!  The good news was that I had to take it with food, so I had to eat 4 times a day!  The bad news is that I put on a shit ton (a metric unit) of weight!!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on June 04, 2022, 10:35:55 PM
Haha. It's not that bad! It's just tennish welts, and only one looks like I melted my skin on the stove.

Weirdly, though, I have no idea where or when I brushed up on some. My arms are usually covered outdoors.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 05, 2022, 05:08:50 AM
Haha. It's not that bad! It's just tennish welts, and only one looks like I melted my skin on the stove.

Weirdly, though, I have no idea where or when I brushed up on some. My arms are usually covered outdoors.

Years ago, I was weed eating an old family cemetery which was full of poison ivy.  I was covered from head to toe, including tucking pant legs into my socks.  I still was struck by the evil ivy.....through the slits where my shirt sleeves buttoned.  It spread in places where the sun don't shine....steroids, back in the day before Zpac so I had insomnia for much too long.  The next time it struck, ZPac was available, so I healed and slept both!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Langue_doc on June 05, 2022, 11:26:15 AM
On a bird walk this morning, we were shown clumps of jewelweed, which is an antidote to poison ivy. Just crush the leaves and stems, and rub them on the rash. Jewelweed is also reputed to work on insect bites and bee stings. Jewelweed grows alongside poison ivy.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 07, 2022, 07:13:08 AM
Didn't know that.  Where I live, poison ivy is native but jewel weed is invasive.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: evil_physics_witchcraft on June 07, 2022, 07:35:53 AM
Pulling from the venting thread...

Bee guy is here and he said the hive is LARGE and it's in the floor, but he thinks he can remove it from outside the house. He's been pulling hive and vacuuming bees for the last hour!!!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 07, 2022, 07:38:38 AM
Haha. It's not that bad! It's just tennish welts, and only one looks like I melted my skin on the stove.

Weirdly, though, I have no idea where or when I brushed up on some. My arms are usually covered outdoors.

Years ago, I was weed eating an old family cemetery which was full of poison ivy.  I was covered from head to toe, including tucking pant legs into my socks.  I still was struck by the evil ivy.....through the slits where my shirt sleeves buttoned.  It spread in places where the sun don't shine....steroids, back in the day before Zpac so I had insomnia for much too long.  The next time it struck, ZPac was available, so I healed and slept both!

Eek!

Besides the poison ivy/oak/etc....which, yes jewelweed (so-called because its hairy leaves hold O2 and glimmer with a silvery sheen when submersed) can assuage.

But, further...um...

I can understand your wish to do caretaking in the yard, but I hope you're staying far clear of the stones themselves.

Just a friendly reminder, weedwands are responsible for much damage to early gravestones: they've been banned in most historical cemeteries and early burying grounds since the 1980s.

They're hard to control, and they can do serious damage even in a glancing blow that may go unnoticed. The rotating nylon arm cuts into the patina of the stone and cases flaking, spalling, and exfoliation, thus destabilizing the base and allowing, over several seasons,  for freeze-cracking and breakage.

Lynne Strangstaff's book on the care of the stones, "A Gravestone Primer," (AGS website) gives more details and options.

A small, scruffy grass collar is much to be preferred to a trimly-cropped, scratched stone base.

Hope that's helpful...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Parasaurolophus on June 07, 2022, 07:44:07 AM
The slugs are out in force these days.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 07, 2022, 08:22:45 AM
Beer in a bottlecap?

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on June 07, 2022, 12:10:07 PM
Interestingly, I had a Disney princess moment a few minutes ago: I heard a tap on the window and--lo and behold--there was a squirrel standing on the brick sill about two feet away. She looked at me, she stretched upward, she stretched downward, she moved left, she moved right--but she couldn't figure out that she couldn't get in.

In about 30-45 seconds, she grew bored and--with a flirt of her tail--decided she'd had enough and scampered over to the porch rail and jumped from there to the porch itself.

(While I do wish I were as acrobatic as a squirrel, I'm glad I don't have to live on a swaying tree branch, keeping my eyes peeled for hawks and dogs.)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Langue_doc on June 07, 2022, 01:55:51 PM
Didn't know that.  Where I live, poison ivy is native but jewel weed is invasive.

Jewelweed is most likely native in our area as these were in Prospect Park which for the past couple of decades has been assiduously removing invasive plants and at the same time planting native trees, shrubs, and plants.

ETA: That's an awkward sentence, but I'm not about to spend more time editing it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 08, 2022, 07:53:55 AM
Haha. It's not that bad! It's just tennish welts, and only one looks like I melted my skin on the stove.

Weirdly, though, I have no idea where or when I brushed up on some. My arms are usually covered outdoors.

Years ago, I was weed eating an old family cemetery which was full of poison ivy.  I was covered from head to toe, including tucking pant legs into my socks.  I still was struck by the evil ivy.....through the slits where my shirt sleeves buttoned.  It spread in places where the sun don't shine....steroids, back in the day before Zpac so I had insomnia for much too long.  The next time it struck, ZPac was available, so I healed and slept both!

Eek!

Besides the poison ivy/oak/etc....which, yes jewelweed (so-called because its hairy leaves hold O2 and glimmer with a silvery sheen when submersed) can assuage.

But, further...um...

I can understand your wish to do caretaking in the yard, but I hope you're staying far clear of the stones themselves.

Just a friendly reminder, weedwands are responsible for much damage to early gravestones: they've been banned in most historical cemeteries and early burying grounds since the 1980s.

They're hard to control, and they can do serious damage even in a glancing blow that may go unnoticed. The rotating nylon arm cuts into the patina of the stone and cases flaking, spalling, and exfoliation, thus destabilizing the base and allowing, over several seasons,  for freeze-cracking and breakage.

Lynne Strangstaff's book on the care of the stones, "A Gravestone Primer," (AGS website) gives more details and options.

A small, scruffy grass collar is much to be preferred to a trimly-cropped, scratched stone base.

Hope that's helpful...

M.

Just ordered the "Primer" and very much appreciate your suggesting it.  The cemetery where I got poison ivy is pretty much overgrown and with the exception of a few more recent graves, will stay overgrown.  We visit but are not in a position to do any clean up there.  The cemetery for which I am a trustee is kept relatively mowed, though folks are dying and aging out.  Alternatives to weed eating which will meet the approval of those still living (a tough bunch) will be helpful so am hoping to find them in the Primer.  A few stones have already been cleaned improperly.Things are what they are sometimes.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 08, 2022, 09:07:24 AM
Glad to be useful!

It's based on protocols developed for historic grounds and their stones by Frank Matero, emeritus at Columbia's art history/ preservation program, and an expert 9f the conservation of external stone statuary.

At the time of the Bicentennial, several caregivers of early grounds became concerned that the kinds of enthusiasts who've done the inappropriate surface cleaning you've found would do manifest damage to early stones, and his work, documented and replicated in several areas, became the go-to standard of care.

There's are longstanding Private Cemetery Associations in several states, too; the AGS membership directory can point you to some of those, too. Whether in your own state or not, they can help with identifying resources to contract out site care, do preservation work, corralling family associations to offer support, etc.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on June 08, 2022, 09:37:34 AM
Haha. It's not that bad! It's just tennish welts, and only one looks like I melted my skin on the stove.

Weirdly, though, I have no idea where or when I brushed up on some. My arms are usually covered outdoors.

Years ago, I was weed eating an old family cemetery which was full of poison ivy.  I was covered from head to toe, including tucking pant legs into my socks.  I still was struck by the evil ivy.....through the slits where my shirt sleeves buttoned.  It spread in places where the sun don't shine....steroids, back in the day before Zpac so I had insomnia for much too long.  The next time it struck, ZPac was available, so I healed and slept both!

Eek!

Besides the poison ivy/oak/etc....which, yes jewelweed (so-called because its hairy leaves hold O2 and glimmer with a silvery sheen when submersed) can assuage.

But, further...um...

I can understand your wish to do caretaking in the yard, but I hope you're staying far clear of the stones themselves.

Just a friendly reminder, weedwands are responsible for much damage to early gravestones: they've been banned in most historical cemeteries and early burying grounds since the 1980s.

They're hard to control, and they can do serious damage even in a glancing blow that may go unnoticed. The rotating nylon arm cuts into the patina of the stone and cases flaking, spalling, and exfoliation, thus destabilizing the base and allowing, over several seasons,  for freeze-cracking and breakage.

Lynne Strangstaff's book on the care of the stones, "A Gravestone Primer," (AGS website) gives more details and options.

A small, scruffy grass collar is much to be preferred to a trimly-cropped, scratched stone base.

Hope that's helpful...

M.

Just ordered the "Primer" and very much appreciate your suggesting it.  The cemetery where I got poison ivy is pretty much overgrown and with the exception of a few more recent graves, will stay overgrown.  We visit but are not in a position to do any clean up there.  The cemetery for which I am a trustee is kept relatively mowed, though folks are dying and aging out.  Alternatives to weed eating which will meet the approval of those still living (a tough bunch) will be helpful so am hoping to find them in the Primer.  A few stones have already been cleaned improperly.Things are what they are sometimes.

Goats love poison ivy-- if you can find some to rent or borrow, they will gladly take care of that problem for you. There are people who rent goat herds specifically for this purpose (they will set up temporarily electric fences and supervise the goats during the time they are there).
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 08, 2022, 10:29:39 AM
Very true, I've seen them (the goats, that is) in action.

That's also quite consistent with very early standards of care for the grounds.

There's at least one 17th c. record according a resident leave to pasture his sheep in the grounds 'to keep the grass down.'

M. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Harlow2 on June 08, 2022, 06:51:25 PM
Arrived home just in time to see a hefty woodchuck walking purposefully next to the back sliding glass door to the patio. He/she doesn’t seem to have eaten anything on the way.  A couple of years ago one stepped on my foot as I sat at the table drinking breakfast coffee. It’s an interesting kind of casual behavior.  Any woodchuck experts here?
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 09, 2022, 06:31:16 AM
Haha. It's not that bad! It's just tennish welts, and only one looks like I melted my skin on the stove.

Weirdly, though, I have no idea where or when I brushed up on some. My arms are usually covered outdoors.

Years ago, I was weed eating an old family cemetery which was full of poison ivy.  I was covered from head to toe, including tucking pant legs into my socks.  I still was struck by the evil ivy.....through the slits where my shirt sleeves buttoned.  It spread in places where the sun don't shine....steroids, back in the day before Zpac so I had insomnia for much too long.  The next time it struck, ZPac was available, so I healed and slept both!

Eek!

Besides the poison ivy/oak/etc....which, yes jewelweed (so-called because its hairy leaves hold O2 and glimmer with a silvery sheen when submersed) can assuage.

But, further...um...

I can understand your wish to do caretaking in the yard, but I hope you're staying far clear of the stones themselves.

Just a friendly reminder, weedwands are responsible for much damage to early gravestones: they've been banned in most historical cemeteries and early burying grounds since the 1980s.

They're hard to control, and they can do serious damage even in a glancing blow that may go unnoticed. The rotating nylon arm cuts into the patina of the stone and cases flaking, spalling, and exfoliation, thus destabilizing the base and allowing, over several seasons,  for freeze-cracking and breakage.

Lynne Strangstaff's book on the care of the stones, "A Gravestone Primer," (AGS website) gives more details and options.

A small, scruffy grass collar is much to be preferred to a trimly-cropped, scratched stone base.

Hope that's helpful...

M.

Just ordered the "Primer" and very much appreciate your suggesting it.  The cemetery where I got poison ivy is pretty much overgrown and with the exception of a few more recent graves, will stay overgrown.  We visit but are not in a position to do any clean up there.  The cemetery for which I am a trustee is kept relatively mowed, though folks are dying and aging out.  Alternatives to weed eating which will meet the approval of those still living (a tough bunch) will be helpful so am hoping to find them in the Primer.  A few stones have already been cleaned improperly.Things are what they are sometimes.

Goats love poison ivy-- if you can find some to rent or borrow, they will gladly take care of that problem for you. There are people who rent goat herds specifically for this purpose (they will set up temporarily electric fences and supervise the goats during the time they are there).

We actually talked about goats the other day.  Our concern (seriously!!) was they would eat the fake flowers, including the metal stems, and scatter detritus and poop over the cemetery!  Then we'd have to pick up poop and fake flower detritus.   The real issue for us is that we're all getting older, as is the case with many family cemeteries.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Puget on June 09, 2022, 02:14:55 PM
We actually talked about goats the other day.  Our concern (seriously!!) was they would eat the fake flowers, including the metal stems, and scatter detritus and poop over the cemetery!  Then we'd have to pick up poop and fake flower detritus.   The real issue for us is that we're all getting older, as is the case with many family cemeteries.

Goats are actually very picky eaters. They nibble at things to find out what they are, the same way babies puts toys in in their mouth, hence the false reputation for eating tin cans etc. But they won't actually chew up things that aren't their preferred foods.

They will of course poop, but it's pretty unobtrusive poop-- little pellets very similar to deer scat. You can just leave it be and it will soon disappear into the ground and be good fertilizer.

(Why yes, I did have goats growing up).
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on June 10, 2022, 06:08:18 AM
We actually talked about goats the other day.  Our concern (seriously!!) was they would eat the fake flowers, including the metal stems, and scatter detritus and poop over the cemetery!  Then we'd have to pick up poop and fake flower detritus.   The real issue for us is that we're all getting older, as is the case with many family cemeteries.

Goats are actually very picky eaters. They nibble at things to find out what they are, the same way babies puts toys in in their mouth, hence the false reputation for eating tin cans etc. But they won't actually chew up things that aren't their preferred foods.

They will of course poop, but it's pretty unobtrusive poop-- little pellets very similar to deer scat. You can just leave it be and it will soon disappear into the ground and be good fertilizer.

(Why yes, I did have goats growing up).

Thanks for this info.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 10, 2022, 07:12:05 AM
The sky has turned black
A rabbit crosses my path
No time for a chat
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on June 10, 2022, 07:14:50 AM
Ah, assonance...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on June 10, 2022, 08:07:28 AM
Thanking about both our struggling World War I memorial tree and the first child to come to our story time on this stormy morning:

That little sapling
Will need much help to survive
In a world of storms
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 01, 2022, 08:26:52 AM
From an early-morning walk before work that was long, but not really long enough:


By a wooded stream
I listened for ten minutes
They passed so quickly!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: AmLitHist on July 01, 2022, 08:34:10 AM
Coming home from Kid #1's farm home after 10 last night, I saw the prettiest little doe.  (There are herds of deer all along that 10-mile stretch through woods and corn and bean fields, so I had the brights on and was watching; we often see deer from late afternoon onward.) She was standing about 8 feet from the right side of the road, just watching; I sensed her there before the headlights caught her, so I slowed way down and had a good look.  She had gorgeous markings and was so petite, clearly born this year.  She didn't get scared or run, but just looked curious.

ALHS saw a family of skunks crossing the road out there the day before (mom and 3 or 4 babies)!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 01, 2022, 09:09:41 AM
Skunks are the prettiest little things...their little faces are so pensive.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Morden on July 03, 2022, 07:48:37 PM
Baby jackrabbit ate all of our carrots. The full grown ones are too big to squeeze under the gates, but this little one played hide and seek with us for a couple days.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Harlow2 on July 05, 2022, 08:22:33 AM
Kayaked through a lake full of large red sliders. Wonderful.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 05, 2022, 08:34:52 AM
I was reminded over the holiday of a family story involving goats.  In the early 1950s one of Dad's uncles developed a stomach cancer.  Since he couldn't eat properly, the doctor advised him to get nourishment from goat's milk.  They got a dairy goat to keep for just that purpose.  Fortunately they lived outside of town--on the property that I would later grow up on--and had plenty of room to keep a goat.

The new goat turned out to be about to have triplets!  This left the family with three kids in addition to the six (human) kids that they already had.  Since the nanny goat's milk was urgently needed for the patient, the children were put to work bottle-feeding the kids.  The children amused themselves by making the little goats get up on their hind legs to get their bottles.  They got into the habit of springing around on their hind legs all the time.  Dad remembers seeing their little goat heads peeping up from behind the fence.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 05, 2022, 09:10:19 AM
I love baby goat faces!!!

And their little underbites are adorable.

I've already posted the link to the site I've been watching, but they, too, started raising goats because one of their family members needed goat's milk for dietary purposes. They now make several cheeses, too.

Speak chevre to me...

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 07, 2022, 07:37:46 AM
This morning I was at the city park and saw a little amphibious bulldozer at work collecting the alligator grass around the banks.  Over the last few years the areas around the banks have been silting up and getting infested with weeds.  They're now trying to get the mess cleaned out to keep the pond from reverting to swamp.  It's a reminder that even our "natural" areas often require quite a bit of management.  We try to guide nature into directions we want it to go in.  It's our niche in the ecology.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on July 07, 2022, 08:41:25 AM
This morning I was at the city park and saw a little amphibious bulldozer at work collecting the alligator grass around the banks.  Over the last few years the areas around the banks have been silting up and getting infested with weeds.  They're now trying to get the mess cleaned out to keep the pond from reverting to swamp.  It's a reminder that even our "natural" areas often require quite a bit of management.  We try to guide nature into directions we want it to go in.  It's our niche in the ecology.

Is the phrase I highlighted above a new way to say "beaver"? j/k (big grin)

_____

My own recent encounter: This morning, on my daily walk, I returned home to find a somewhat unafraid rabbit on our front lawn. I was within 10 feet of it (!!).
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on July 07, 2022, 09:10:39 AM
A young turtle sunning itself on the log in the middle of the river allowed me to take a few photos.

Turtle photo-ops are rare.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 07, 2022, 12:10:57 PM
This morning I was at the city park and saw a little amphibious bulldozer at work collecting the alligator grass around the banks.  Over the last few years the areas around the banks have been silting up and getting infested with weeds.  They're now trying to get the mess cleaned out to keep the pond from reverting to swamp.  It's a reminder that even our "natural" areas often require quite a bit of management.  We try to guide nature into directions we want it to go in.  It's our niche in the ecology.

Is the phrase I highlighted above a new way to say "beaver"? j/k (big grin)

_____

My own recent encounter: This morning, on my daily walk, I returned home to find a somewhat unafraid rabbit on our front lawn. I was within 10 feet of it (!!).

That was a pretty bold rabbit!

I found out more about the work at the pond today.  I had to speak at the local Rotary Club at lunch, and the Mayor happened to be there.  She talked like that odd amphibious work vehicle was a bit of a home-built job.  Apparently the guy who operates it is much in demand regionally for cleaning out ponds.  Most of the work will be on the upper pond (The one upstream of the park causeway).  The lower pond is larger and less clogged, and the Game and Fish Commission's wildlife biologists have advised that leaving most of the existing grass in place there will provide good fish habitat.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 08, 2022, 07:30:51 AM
I saw the amphibious pond rehabilitation work going on again this morning.  Wish I knew who it was who's doing it.  With a job like that, he'd probably be an interesting guy to talk to.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on July 13, 2022, 09:57:26 AM
This morning I watched a lizard scurrying around the library's front entrance.  It froze for a while, and we stared at each other.  Then it turned, and the light caught it just right to see what a nice sheen it had.  Then it ran and hid in a crack not far from the entrance.  I hope it doesn't manage to wander inside, or it will create a panic, and I'll have to try to catch it, and might accidentally hurt it in the process.

Usually we just see them around the staff entrance in back.  We've had green anole lizards living back there for as long as I've been here.  Wonder how many generations of lizards I've seen there?

Even in an ordinary small town, you see so many amazing pieces of God's creation running/flying/swimming around.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on August 01, 2022, 09:17:02 AM
There's an amazing earthquake swarm going on in Iceland!  Map here:  https://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes/
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mythbuster on August 01, 2022, 01:47:27 PM
Here's a good explanation of what's happening in Iceland right now. I got hooked on this You Tube Channel when planning my trip to the Big Island. They have short weekly updates on volcano activity around the world. Volcanos are cool and much more common that I ever thought.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcFgbid8d9A (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcFgbid8d9A)
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 01, 2022, 03:02:45 PM
Yes, this one's good, too:

    https://youtu.be/fcFgbid8d9A

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on August 03, 2022, 09:00:04 AM
Here's a good explanation of what's happening in Iceland right now. I got hooked on this You Tube Channel when planning my trip to the Big Island. They have short weekly updates on volcano activity around the world. Volcanos are cool and much more common that I ever thought.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcFgbid8d9A (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcFgbid8d9A)

And, it's now erupting!  There are several live-streams on youtube already....
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Langue_doc on August 07, 2022, 07:48:21 PM
Deer sightings in two different states. The first sighting was during an evening walk when I heard a rustle in the bushes on the other side of the road. First came a deer, skipping across the path in the middle. The partner paused, saw me across the street, and just stood there looking at me. We must have stayed put for at least 5-10 minutes. The following week, in another state, we saw a couple of the most gorgeous colored deer, one with magnificent antlers. They took off, but not before we had a good look at them. In just a few months, around hunting season, the golden brown color will turn into an unattractive dark brown.

On the way out, I was driving along CT 15, enjoying not only the truck-free traffic but also the trees on either side of the parkway and the medians. On the way back, just a couple of weeks later, I was dismayed to see that many of the trees in the medians had been cut down leaving just brown earth and a few stumps that were scheduled to be removed. There were huge swaths of bare earth where the trees had been and machinery. Oh, Connecticutt, how could you cut down so many mature trees in the middle of a hot summer!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 08, 2022, 08:20:55 AM
It's sickening.

I've seen it in places where I was sure the whole point was just to give someone's uncle or brother or son with a landscape team some work.

We've got some kind of split-the-sewage thing going on, which will be good in the long run, but they just tore up a whole nature path, complete with wooden boardwalk, to do a part of the split-off.

Mad.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on August 15, 2022, 02:42:15 PM
On baking asphalt
A new cicada carcass
Crunches underfoot
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 15, 2022, 03:30:39 PM
It's sickening.

I've seen it in places where I was sure the whole point was just to give someone's uncle or brother or son with a landscape team some work.

We've got some kind of split-the-sewage thing going on, which will be good in the long run, but they just tore up a whole nature path, complete with wooden boardwalk, to do a part of the split-off.

Mad.

M.

Ok, so, maybe "modified..." hmm...not "rapture," but "modified foreboding," maybe...

They did tear up a part of a garden but they left the fenced in parts alone and they've already finished, re-covered with dirt, and spread straw over all the area they tore up, so it looks like more respect was given the area than I'd anticipated.

Part of the pollinator garden was messed up, but they left the part of that that was in line with the other garden areas, and they didn't even knock the sign down, so it's less upsetting than it might have been (I'd been avoiding it for the past week, even after the "path closed" signs came down because I just figured it would make me mad...)

So, could have been worse, and I do agree with the splitting of sewage from run-off water that is the underlying MO of this project (which has been progressing for a few years now, from one watershed area to another). It puts less strain on the water purification facilities and lets cleaner run-off go straight back into the water cycle, which is wise.

So, maybe a 1/2-win//1/2-win??

M. 
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on August 29, 2022, 07:22:16 AM
On the morning trail
A turtle in no hurry
So I step around
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 29, 2022, 08:25:34 AM
Over a thousand
 miles away, a turtle's young
cousin is sunning

itself on a trunk
in a river that will not
meet the same ocean.

Four swans--two adults,
two cygnets--also swim by,
nor will ever meet.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on August 30, 2022, 07:30:24 AM
The swans must be lovely.

The late rains have brought
A bumper crop of mushrooms
Yards full of fungi
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on August 30, 2022, 11:40:08 AM
A visit to the Mushroom Planet may be in order...

;--}

A loud 'plop!' suggests
a larger, fatter turtle's
dive...but I missed him.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: Thursday's_Child on August 30, 2022, 11:59:29 AM
Speaking of turtles, my favorite underwater live-stream camera just captured a beautiful sea turtle swimming by!

Use the red time-line to re-wind the live-stream to 14.22.45 on the clock in the lower L corner of the cam view.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7i8ARjIeM2k
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 12, 2022, 07:27:29 AM
The final buzzings
Of a mature cicada
No need for sadness
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: paultuttle on September 14, 2022, 05:43:14 AM
Not one, not two, but three red-tailed hawks in the nearby church's parking lot fighting with three crows over something edible during yesterday's early-morning walk.

And a young fox in the church's vegetable garden, two days earlier (light orange with black feet and an inquisitive, triangular face). When I stopped and stared, it streaked away only to stand panting in the church's soccer field, about 75 yards further from me, watching to see if I was still a threat.

Quite different from the chubby brown rabbit during that same earlier walk who kept one eye on me and one eye on the lush grass it was nibbling as I walked past, slowly, within six feet of it.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on September 15, 2022, 03:53:00 PM
Not one, not two, but three red-tailed hawks in the nearby church's parking lot fighting with three crows over something edible during yesterday's early-morning walk   Good vs.  Evil ???
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: FishProf on September 16, 2022, 04:56:56 AM
I wouldn't call hawks evil, so much as mercenary.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 16, 2022, 05:41:55 AM
And crows are hardly always 'good,' they attack baby birds!

Meanwhile, I've met a new, to me, shy, very interesting warerbird that hid so well once it saw me that I couldn't get a clear photo of it.

Very 'feathery,' with a little spiky Dennis-the-Menace cowlick, and its wings didn't "settle" around its body as duck's wings do, to make a solid shape...so, more linear than volumetric in appearance.

And it did that little pokey back-and-forth thing with its head, as if it were voguing to some inner drummer...like pigeons do, but more impertinent,  less matter-of-fact, it seemed to me.

It swam in my sight for as long as it took me to get my camera on, then headed under some overhanging Brandes until I moved away. I tried to turn and catch it after that, but it was really cagey, I don't think I got a good picture of it....

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 21, 2022, 06:15:52 AM
Not exactly "fauna"--this morning as I walked around the pond at the city park, I saw what looked like a pair of rather large fish lying near the water's edge.  I looked closer and saw that they were actually a pair of pisciform flip-flop sandals.  They were made so that it looked like the wearer's toes were sticking out of the "fishes" mouths.  They weren't just child-sized either.  Never seen any footwear quite like them.  They would probably have looked kind of cute if they hadn't been all muddy.  I relocated them to a nearby trash can.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: nebo113 on September 22, 2022, 08:38:56 AM
Not exactly "fauna"--this morning as I walked around the pond at the city park, I saw what looked like a pair of rather large fish lying near the water's edge.  I looked closer and saw that they were actually a pair of pisciform flip-flop sandals.  They were made so that it looked like the wearer's toes were sticking out of the "fishes" mouths.  They weren't just child-sized either.  Never seen any footwear quite like them.  They would probably have looked kind of cute if they hadn't been all muddy.  I relocated them to a nearby trash can.

Hmmmm.....I might have appropriated them!
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: mamselle on September 22, 2022, 10:08:06 AM
A few regular (mallard) ducks, nothing else this AM.

Cool, chilly, about to rain when I got home.

M.
Title: Re: Fauna and other natural things
Post by: apl68 on September 22, 2022, 01:51:37 PM
A grey heron at the park this morning, after mostly seeing egrets lately.