Author Topic: Look! A bird!  (Read 39854 times)

FishProf

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #750 on: December 28, 2022, 06:38:00 AM »
After a critter-less cold snap, we once again have jays and sparrows (and squirrels).

CatTV is really popular these days.
And how is that working out for you?

Thursday's_Child

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #751 on: December 28, 2022, 09:43:24 AM »
Recently we've had a little flock of about a dozen something-or-others flying around the neighborhood.  Between my poor eyesight and my limited bird-spotting know-how, I can't tell you what they are.  Whatever they are, they're close-knit.  I see them flying around or perched on phone lines as a unit.  Yesterday afternoon I saw them making rounds of the street in formation.  It's amazing how they can turn, dip, rise, and all go to ground in unison.  They did have a bit of trouble when they swooped down around the branches of a tree at one point.  Then they got away from that entanglement and promptly re-established the formation.

Might be Cedar Waxwings if you're lucky, or Starlings if you're not.  Do they call?  A single high-pitched note is one way to recognize the Waxwings.

apl68

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #752 on: December 28, 2022, 10:29:31 AM »
Recently we've had a little flock of about a dozen something-or-others flying around the neighborhood.  Between my poor eyesight and my limited bird-spotting know-how, I can't tell you what they are.  Whatever they are, they're close-knit.  I see them flying around or perched on phone lines as a unit.  Yesterday afternoon I saw them making rounds of the street in formation.  It's amazing how they can turn, dip, rise, and all go to ground in unison.  They did have a bit of trouble when they swooped down around the branches of a tree at one point.  Then they got away from that entanglement and promptly re-established the formation.

Might be Cedar Waxwings if you're lucky, or Starlings if you're not.  Do they call?  A single high-pitched note is one way to recognize the Waxwings.

I haven't heard them call so far.  They're bigger than starlings, and their flock is nowhere near as big as starling flocks normally are.
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For how does a man profit if he gains the whole world, yet loses his own soul?

AmLitHist

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #753 on: December 29, 2022, 06:43:15 AM »
Once it warmed up (i.e., above single digits during the days), I've had several kinds of finches and sparrows, a nuthatch, titmice, and a hairy woodpecker at the feeders outside my home office window.  And grackles, always the grackles.  It's OK--they need to eat, too.

Harlow2

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #754 on: December 29, 2022, 03:03:13 PM »
Because we have skunks and other critters that like to eat bird seed our condo will allow only thistle (and that is after I begged and let them know squirrels won’t go near it). We also don’t have many trees, so I get only Carolina wrens, house and purple finches, and mostly juncos. We do have the odd hawk though.

Langue_doc

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #755 on: January 04, 2023, 05:37:39 PM »
On one of my favorite walks in a vast park-like area, I saw a peregrine falcon swoop down by the water's edge, then get into the water to take a bath, hop out to dry its wings, throw its head back and open its mouth wide, and then get back into the water for another bath. This bathing, drying out, throwing the head back and opening the mouth was repeated three times. I must have ventured a bit too close for comfort, so the falcon took off and perched on a tree branch where it stayed for quite some time. This was my New Year's Day treat!

apl68

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #756 on: January 09, 2023, 01:08:33 PM »
On one of my favorite walks in a vast park-like area, I saw a peregrine falcon swoop down by the water's edge, then get into the water to take a bath, hop out to dry its wings, throw its head back and open its mouth wide, and then get back into the water for another bath. This bathing, drying out, throwing the head back and opening the mouth was repeated three times. I must have ventured a bit too close for comfort, so the falcon took off and perched on a tree branch where it stayed for quite some time. This was my New Year's Day treat!

Sounds like a wonderful way to begin the year!
If any would follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.
For whoever will save his life will lose it, but whoever will lose it for my sake will find it.
For how does a man profit if he gains the whole world, yet loses his own soul?

apl68

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #757 on: January 09, 2023, 01:13:34 PM »
We sometimes see and hear raptors flying over our town.  We also sometimes have skies crisscrossed with condensation trails from military jet aircraft practicing maneuvers.  I've always supposed that this was because our local timber products mill--a large industrial complex located far from any large population centers or major airline flight lanes--made a handy place to practice simulated attacks and defenses.

Anyway, this afternoon while walking back from lunch, I observed both.


Screeching bird of prey
Above my head, yet below
The dueling aircraft
If any would follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.
For whoever will save his life will lose it, but whoever will lose it for my sake will find it.
For how does a man profit if he gains the whole world, yet loses his own soul?

the_geneticist

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #758 on: January 09, 2023, 02:24:16 PM »
We have a black Phoebe that likes to hang out near the compost pile and catch flying insects.  I love their little crest that they can pop up and the "tee hee! tee hee!" call.  Drives our cats bonkers.

Langue_doc

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #759 on: January 10, 2023, 05:31:32 AM »
A pair of red-tailed hawks were circling above buildings on a very busy street for quite some time, probably taking advantage of the wind currents. I was on an architectural tour, so was half listening to the information about the historic buildings on that street because watching the hawks having fun was far more interesting, given the location. The buildings were quite interesting too, as they were formerly mansions which now have been subdivided into four to six apartments.

Langue_doc

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #760 on: January 22, 2023, 06:19:38 PM »
More bird sightings in the vast park-like expanse--last Sunday was relatively quiet, other than a few tufted titmice, white-breasted nuthatches, the usual blue jays, a couple of northern mockingbirds, a few black-capped chickadees, and a couple of red-tailed hawks flying overhead. On the small island in the middle of the man-made lake, skulking among the tall dried grasses was a great blue heron, standing still for the longest time. I saw him in the same spot as I was going up several paths, and also when I was coming down on yet another path. He was also there, in the same spot yesterday morning and also today.

Yesterday was a very active birdy morning, as I could hear all kinds of chirps and cheeps as soon as I opened the car door. The first was a red-bellied woodpecker, looking for food just above my head. In addition to the heron above, and the usual birds, I came upon what looked like a juvenile red-tailed hawk sitting on a branch by the feeder that had birds flying in and out of it. The hawk kept swiveling its head in every which way whenever a bird alighted on the feeder, took off, or was just flying past it, reminiscent of a baby moving its head to look at objects above its crib. The hawk then flew down and got its talons tangled in a twig which he managed to shake off. He then took off, with his foot tangled in yet another twig. Later in the walk, I heard a couple of crows cawing loudly--they were chasing a red-tailed hawk away from what might have been their nest. Today, in addition to the heron and the assorted birds, I saw a peregrine falcon land on one of the topmost branches of a pine tree, then hop up the branches to the very top from where he surveyed his domain. After sitting there for more than a couple of minutes, he took off and landed on a branch of another tree. There were also the usual woodpeckers on the tree trunks and birds of prey flying overhead.

apl68

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Re: Look! A bird!
« Reply #761 on: January 23, 2023, 07:26:17 AM »
I didn't spot any of our local herons on my morning walk, but I did hear one croaking at one point.
If any would follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.
For whoever will save his life will lose it, but whoever will lose it for my sake will find it.
For how does a man profit if he gains the whole world, yet loses his own soul?