Author Topic: Where should prof emeritus retire  (Read 5102 times)

Second Chance

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2019, 10:55:11 AM »
Again, thanks, and am adding stuff to a list.

on quiet, i'm assuming for all these, one can find quiet accomodations?- except perhaps for the snowbirding in Florida idea; i like that in principle, but alot of winter housing is pretty tightly packed together (in manufactured housing...).

at beginning of my career, i loved charlottesville, VA and thought that would be perfect place to be. Last time i visited was about 10 years ago - and somehow magic was gone. Hard to know what percent of that was me changing and what percent was C'ville changing. Also loved wolfeboro NH (but a while ago- who knows now), though not exactly college town. problem with that is too much snow and even if i escaped for a couple of months south, i thnk overall, a little colder than I want. so scrateched that off (but just to give you a sense of what i have liked). I did surprisingly well in flagstaff, AZ - always had more energy there than predicted when i visisted - but way too much snow and don't want to winter in phonex or tucson, i don't think. For much of my early life, i thought ideal was to live by the coast and that had been a goal, but i guess i changed so now i find the intnese sun unpleasant, i prefer forests to topen vistas of oceans, and even the noise and sights of the waves make me a bit dizzy...Good thing i can't afford to be right on a coast anyway (so maybe some sour grapes, but i do think i've changed).

haven't ever been to the northwest and wonder if i should try somehow to visit. San Francisco was a far north as ever was on the west.

but running a list based on your all suggestions , besides NW, those places in SC, NC, and even tenessess sound pretty intersting; will check on sunshine amounts in the little towns maybe. I wonder if i can pull off international or if that would just remain a dream. too risky to do it sight unseen...possibly even impossible. Anyway, will go thru everyones post again.

mythbuster

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #16 on: October 30, 2019, 01:09:03 PM »
Since you like the forest, I would add British Columbia, Canada to the list. Vancouver is of course insanely expensive, but something in Victoria, or one of the smaller towns on the Southern coast of Vancouver Island might just fit the bill.

Second Chance

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2019, 03:32:34 PM »
I'm guessing canada would be too cold :(  I thought would be cool to go to nova scotia (I think i saw some pics of that and was blown away 0r was that newfoundland?.,..). but i think too cold now. otherwise, like the idea a lot.

mythbuster

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2019, 04:01:25 PM »
Much of southern BC is surprisingly temperate. They are much more likely to have a winter rain storm than a snow storm. Nova Scotia on the other hand, gets real snow.

Second Chance

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2019, 07:34:22 AM »
ok on BC. Will look. I guess i'm so much more familair with things on the East.

Puget

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #20 on: October 31, 2019, 08:34:45 AM »
ok on BC. Will look. I guess i'm so much more familair with things on the East.

I think it has become non-trivial to immigrate to Canada unless you are a citizen of a Commonwealth country or have a ton of money (speaking French also gets you points, even though no one in BC speaks French). Victoria is cute but I'm pretty sure quite expensive now.

You will get a very similar climate on the Washington side of the border. If you're looking for smaller towns and REALLY don't mind rain, you could check out the Olympic Peninsula. Forests it has certainly, plus coast that's not sunny most of the year (summers are fairly sunny, but not too hot). Lots of towns that have seen better economic days (downturn in fishing and logging industries) so property is cheap, but lots of outdoor recreation and enough tourism that there are shops and restaurants etc. Port Townsend is charming and quirky, but may be more expensive now.
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newprofwife

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2019, 12:17:33 PM »
Well. I am going to retire and move to a warmer climate...that's all I know. I'm stuck in this tundra for now but I won't die here. Only time will tell if me or my husband go first but either way, there is no way in hell, I'll spend my golden years in New England. I plan to be somewhere warm where I can drive and walk easily to places within 20 minutes of me. I hate driving but I'll take inspiration from the millennials and assume that in the future, there will be something better than uber to drive me around-maybe a self driving car. 

Anselm

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #22 on: November 01, 2019, 04:48:29 PM »
For those of you concerned about winter, you do have the option of having a modest home or trailer in Arizona and spending winters there.   

I have not come up with a plan yet for myself. 
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Second Chance

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2019, 05:43:20 AM »
is no way in hell, I'll spend my golden years in New England. I plan to be somewhere warm where I can drive and walk easily to places within 20 minutes of me.

Yeah, i do know what you mean. Can get pretty snowy and frigid up there. Do you like sun? you probably do, in which case the usual suspects for sunny warm places are probably on the list, like florida . Wha't your timetable

Second Chance

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #24 on: November 03, 2019, 05:46:03 AM »
For those of you concerned about winter, you do have the option of having a modest home or trailer in Arizona and spending winters there.   

I have not come up with a plan yet for myself.

I've been thinking of that as a model- two different residences. I used to do that, not for weather reasons, and enjoyed it. Now it feels harder. Not sure how i'd manage upkeep from a distance of a second house. having trouble enuf finding (and affording) a first. On trailer or manufactured communities (there are tons of affordable ones in Florida), i'm not sure if i can handle the chemical toxins of manufactured housing, and for trailors, not even sure how that works- hookups for sewere and water and elec and gas in a trailor park? would it be noisy?

what's your time talbe for a plan. i'm really hopinng to have this settled by end of june but seems hard.

backatit

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #25 on: November 03, 2019, 06:26:51 AM »
Trailers in Florida aren't a great idea for two reasons - they tend to be moldy, and hurricanes. The offgassing in newer models is also a concern to me. I don't mind Florida winters, though - I'm here now visiting relatives and it's a bit warm, but it's a lot colder up North! I've been in February and it's just gorgeous.

Second Chance

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #26 on: November 03, 2019, 10:31:22 AM »
The offgassing in newer models is also a concern to me.

Same here. its the same kind of issue as manufactured housing.
Still stuck...Yes, if i go someplace cold, would like to spend Febs in florida; have too many "would likes" and have to take action on something.

larryc

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #27 on: November 04, 2019, 10:54:55 PM »
There are many good places to live. I agree that the Pacific Northwest seems to fit your bill pretty well. Obviously Portland and Seattle are out of reach, but check out Olympia, Tacoma, etc. My wife and I were in Port Townsend last month and it is charming and quirky and quiet and cultured. If you don't mind a bit of snow explore east of the mountains--Ellensburg, Spokane, Bend.

Second Chance

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #28 on: November 06, 2019, 11:04:30 AM »
. I agree that the Pacific Northwest seems to fit your bill pretty well.

Thanks. Not sure  I can get myself there to visit. Come across anything Eastern half of country that has similar vibes?

mamselle

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #29 on: November 08, 2019, 06:42:37 PM »
Delaware, OH, or if you want an actual college-like town, just outside of Worthington (north of Col's) or Otterbein.

Or Oberlin, Mansfield, Athens, Miami/Ohio.

Each has a school, and each has a nearby apron of open space linked by small state routes to the nearby larger towns.

The campus towns tend to be more diverse than other parts of the state; you will get snow and cold air in winter, but that's when you're going to Florida, right?

Likewise, the areas near but not in college towns in Illinois and Indiana.

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