Author Topic: Where should prof emeritus retire  (Read 5100 times)

Bbmaj7b5

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #60 on: December 07, 2019, 12:27:48 PM »
Sounds like a university town in a mid-Atlantic state might be what you're looking for? Friends just moved to Blacksburg, VA .

Thanks. Will add blacksburg VA to list - Never heard of it. I'ts possible mid-Atlantic is the sweet spot. new england is too cold. Not sure though if south is too hot. So maybe my short list for region that's emerging to consider based on everyones commetns is mid adlantic, south of there as well, including NC, northern florida, eastern alabama, and also the ozarks, and then in addition, the northwest, especially Washingon.

Blacksburg is where VA Tech is. It's a nice town in the middle of not a lot, and the nearest city of any size is Roanoke. I lived near Newark, DE for my doctoral degree, and being only a few miles from either Philadelphia or Baltimore had its advantages. That's in the same general vicinity of the country within a couple hundred miles.

Given your descriptions to date - yes, the South will be too hot for you.

Historymistress88

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #61 on: December 14, 2019, 12:26:44 PM »
Dear Forumites:

 I'm planning to retire in about a year, and am tired of the California fires after several evacuations.  I've been looking at Ithaca as a possibility for retirement.  Any thoughts on Ithaca?

cathwen

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #62 on: December 14, 2019, 04:05:11 PM »
I lived in Ithaca for 30 years.  It is a lovely town--very progressive, excellent restaurants, nice little shops, and now some big box stores as well.  But I hope you like cold weather and snow!  Winter is very long.  The first year I lived there, it snowed in both October and May, and a lot in between.   (May snows are rare.)  While it is not as cold as probably anywhere in Minnesota or North Dakota, you will get occasional temperatures below zero, -10 or even -20.  Because of all the snow plus the many hills, winter driving can be challenging.  On the other hand, they have mastered the art of snow removal pretty well.

But summers are glorious--the state parks (yes, plural!) are beautiful, each with hiking trails through the gorges.  (And the gorges run through the city itself.)  If you're into geology, Ithaca is very interesting from that perspective. 

It will certainly be a change from California! 

Hibush

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #63 on: December 14, 2019, 05:11:01 PM »
Dear Forumites:

 I'm planning to retire in about a year, and am tired of the California fires after several evacuations.  I've been looking at Ithaca as a possibility for retirement.  Any thoughts on Ithaca?


There is plenty of water, so fire is not a big issue (though NY bans open fires in the spring to prevent wildfires). Ithaca is full of former Californians who have adapted to the climate, which is more moderate than New England, the northern Appalachians and the upper Midwest. There is also negligible traffic.

Kendal is a retirement community for the intellectually engaged. At one time there were four or five Nobel laureates living there.

Recent Ithaca retirees who are now in their 70s were once convinced that they should not trust anyone over 30. You will find them at protests still.

That's the perspective from someone outside the 10 square miles surrounded by reality, but who sometimes ventures in.




Historymistress88

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Re: Where should prof emeritus retire
« Reply #64 on: December 15, 2019, 01:37:45 PM »
Thanks--this is very helpful!