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General Discussion / Re: The Venting Thread
« Last post by clean on May 06, 2021, 06:50:03 PM »
I am giving a take home exam this term (following through since last year when we went to Covid time).  I gave them the final exam 10 days ago (maybe 11).  The exam is not until Monday. 
Last night a student writes, "As I am working through these questions, I'm realizing that a lot of these are more advanced than anything we covered in class. What do you suggest would help? Would the homework be an okay place to study? " 
The exam is almost exclusively problems. 

Now I am finding that any questions I respond to include the page/figure/chart from the text,  the day the class discussed the issue (class recordings are available for review and all the paper notes are available as well), and I include the problems that were assigned from the text.  It has certainly slowed my response time, but the answers are now VERY thorough!

Still, I m annoyed that I am using time when I get questions that are really from prerequisite classes!  It is bad enough that some of these students (Junior level FINANCE majors) didnt learn this in the prereq class, but I covered these topics myself!  (How many times, and in How Many Courses does it take before they actually LEARN how to do things like this??)

So I get questions like, "I calculated the variance by square rooting the std dev that I got from the calculator, is that not correct? "  (note that they are allowed to use Excel if they choose).

" If we have already calculated the variance of the market and the variance of asset A, wouldn't covariance be the product of those two variances? "

"I was reviewing how to solve for standard deviation and on the in class examples the probabilities were whole like .30 and .40 so when we "tricked the calculator" as you said, we entered the numbers 3 times for the .30 and four times for .40, it makes since because it is out of 100% (10 number sets).

However, on my exam I got half percentages like 0.25 and 0.15 for probability, how do I enter the numbers in to solve it correctly? I don't get it because I can't enter the numbers 2 and a half times? Additionally, I was reviewing the first exam and on this same type of problem it gave whole probabilities like .10, .20, .30, and .40 also understandable to enter into the calculator like the in-class example. I just don't understand how to solve it with half number probabilities like 0.15 and 0.25? Please provide some guidance on this.

I replied, and was given a follow up statement - "I have divided my probabilities by "5" and am left with 5, 3, and 12 these numbers do not add up to 10? The example you gave in the last email is understandable .25, .50, and .25 would be 1, 2, 1 in the calculator. The least common denominator between .15, .25, and .60 is 300, which gives me decimals not whole numbers to enter into the calculator. "

....The least common denominator between .15, .25, and .60 is 300[.... and Variance is the square root of standard deviation....   from FINANCE majors!

THESE FAILURES ARE NOT MY FAULT!!!

While I have spent a lot of CLASS TIME to make sure that they are supposed to know HOW to do things (and not rely on preprogrammed calculator or Excel functions), they seem lost! They are unable to do them WITH OR WITHOUT a calculator!! 


Exams are Monday.  My preliminary, targeted RETIREMENT DATE is in 'only' 1334 DAYS!!!
If my portfolio holds up, and these sorts of questions, along with the students falsely claiming that the exam questions are much harder than anything done in class (which means when they get to Watch ME solve the problems!!)  Retirement may become a very welcome option!!


Bastards!
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General Discussion / Re: Herd your cats here
« Last post by evil_physics_witchcraft on May 06, 2021, 05:58:58 PM »
So, elder evil cat likes to drag one of his blankets around the house. We've noticed, in the past few years, that he also starts to hump it AND make biscuits while yowling with part of the blanket in his mouth. Does anyone else have a cat that does this?

Is my cat broken???
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I don't see the difference between bad and good art; art is subjective.

Do you mean that the evaluation of art (i.e. as good or bad) is subjective, or that what counts as art is subjective? (To show my cards, I don't agree with either claim, but if I'm going to bore you with a bunch of long posts or badger you with disagreements, it's best if they're on target!)

Please badger if you've got the time.  I'd like to know.  Suggest readings that are accessible to a non-philosopher----the summer is coming.

Quote
All Capital-A-Art has this kind of weight.  One does not look at a splatter painting and think, "You know, I will respect women after this," but Pollock is saying, This is a painting; it is up to you to discover why, and that is a moral statement about the nature of Art.  Philip Glass and Becket do the same thing.

The spit-painted hands on cave walls make us think and feel (sorry mamselle).

These are morals.

I'm sorry, but I still don't understand this use of 'moral'. Is it just in the sense of 'lesson', e.g. 'the moral of the story'? Or do you perhaps just mean something like the idea that all art uses its artistic vehicle to convey its artistic content?

I think there is a lesson.  'Rembrandt painted this way, but I am going to spatter house paint, and you will learn a new way of seeing, and you must make an evaluation of art, and that is the moral of the lesson.'

And again, I am simply suggesting that these reactions are some of the oldest experiences of humanity (sorry mamselle) which is why the humanities are primary to education. 
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Quote
I don't see the difference between bad and good art; art is subjective.

Plenty of people would say that but the artist wouldn't. It's only subjective in the sense that you can't prove it's art like you prove something in geometry. But to the artist the difference between art, not quite art, and a fraudulent representation of art is clear.
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General Discussion / Re: NYT Spelling Bee
« Last post by ab_grp on May 06, 2021, 03:31:44 PM »
Ciao_yall, yep I think the Wordplay blog is sometimes a little too much help.  I'm glad if the Shunn site is better for you as well.  And there is a word that is not in the puzzle today (missing the M) that is pretty similar to the pangram.   At least, that's how husband happened upon it.  It's more used in my line of work than his, so I was more familiar with it or maybe more primed to see it.

Congrats on the QB, Langue_doc! It wasn't that bitter of an end, though, right? :-)  And sure, if you are around and want to send some LB hints, that would be great.  I keep finding more contenders but need to figure out what to do with a couple letters that keep ending up in my remainders.
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I don't see the difference between bad and good art; art is subjective.

Do you mean that the evaluation of art (i.e. as good or bad) is subjective, or that what counts as art is subjective? (To show my cards, I don't agree with either claim, but if I'm going to bore you with a bunch of long posts or badger you with disagreements, it's best if they're on target!)

Quote
All Capital-A-Art has this kind of weight.  One does not look at a splatter painting and think, "You know, I will respect women after this," but Pollock is saying, This is a painting; it is up to you to discover why, and that is a moral statement about the nature of Art.  Philip Glass and Becket do the same thing.

The spit-painted hands on cave walls make us think and feel (sorry mamselle).

These are morals.

I'm sorry, but I still don't understand this use of 'moral'. Is it just in the sense of 'lesson', e.g. 'the moral of the story'? Or do you perhaps just mean something like the idea that all art uses its artistic vehicle to convey its artistic content?
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I don't see the difference between bad and good art; art is subjective.  Two Broke Girls, as inane, poorly written, badly acted and unwatchable as that show was, is a multicultural show about empowering women (as stupid as that sounds, those are the themes of the show).  And I don't know that Two Broke Girls' message is any less powerful than The Handmaiden's Tale, just  very different deliveries.  These two feminist statements will appeal to different audiences.

All Capital-A-Art has this kind of weight.  One does not look at a splatter painting and think, "You know, I will respect women after this," but Pollock is saying, This is a painting; it is up to you to discover why, and that is a moral statement about the nature of Art.  Philip Glass and Becket do the same thing.

The spit-painted hands on cave walls make us think and feel (sorry mamselle).

These are morals. 



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General Discussion / Re: The Running Thread
« Last post by pink_ on May 06, 2021, 03:02:39 PM »
I sterilize a safety pin, but same idea. It's gnarly.
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General Discussion / Re: NYT Spelling Bee
« Last post by Langue_doc on May 06, 2021, 02:58:18 PM »
Try rearranging the letters--you'll see the word.

I had decided not to pursue the bee to the bitter end, but once I saw the QBs on this thread, decided to forge ahead, and got to QB. I found the unrecognizable words early on, so finding the remaining four words didn't take up much time.

I'm curious about the "ship" words, ciao_yall. Let us know tomorrow.

ab_grp, let me know if you need a hint for LB.
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They are my son's go-to breakfast. Not those flavors, mercifully.
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