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#31
The State of Higher Ed / Re: IHE: Academic Freedom Batt...
Last post by Wahoo Redux - March 01, 2024, 07:26:10 PM
Quote from: ciao_yall on March 01, 2024, 05:10:35 PMThen I found this article by Chris Rufo, which tries to create direct links between Drag Queen Story Hour and BDSM, pedophilia, subversion, "necrophilia, bestiality, and race fetishism."

QuoteWhen parents, voters, and political leaders understand the true nature of Drag Queen Story Hour and the ideology that drives it, they will work quickly to restore the limits that have been temporarily—and recklessly—abandoned. They will draw a bright line between adult sexuality and childhood innocence, and send the perversions of "genderfuck," "primitivism," and "degeneracy" back to the margins, where they belong.

This is when hate boils over.

Good people who believe they are doing no harm when they deny drag queens the community room...

...because they are afraid of the community reaction...

...because they have been taught that drag queens are somehow wrong...

...because they think that God is upset about drag queens (while Israel and Gaza commit endless atrocities on each other and Putin threatens nuclear war)...

...because they have a personal, visceral reaction to drag queens (as they might a clown)...

...because they believe other people have an "ideology" (apparently unaware of their own)....

...or because they just don't like people who are different...

...feed into Rufo's fascist hysterical rage.

To deny a drag queen the community room or to stonewall a rainbow crosswalk may seem like small things, but those sorts of things hurt people very badly and encourage the deep hatemongers to act on their hatred. 

Don't be those people.
#32
The State of Higher Ed / Re: IHE: Academic Freedom Batt...
Last post by ciao_yall - March 01, 2024, 05:10:35 PM
Quote from: apl68 on March 01, 2024, 01:38:55 PMDismissing my stance regarding drag queen storytimes as impossible to explain as stemming from anything other than hate is reductive.  Every library and librarian sometimes has to make decisions not to permit a proposed library event or event in a library meeting room.  Libraries have to make guidelines and policies, and then they have to make judgement calls when it turns out the guideline or policy was unable to spell out every possible contingency ahead of time.  And every library has different guidelines and policies and judgements, because libraries and communities aren't all alike, and there's no one-size-fits-all.

In the case of community rooms, I have to tell people every year that we can't let them use our library's community room.  It's generally for reasons that don't have anything to do with hot-button culture war issues.  For example, we have a policy of not letting our community room be used for religious services, broadly defined.  The room's not really there for such services in the first place, and we don't want to give any hint of favoritism toward one or another group, and the simplest way to manage that is to have a single rule that rules them all out.  Our rule might not stand up to a court case, but we've never had a challenge to it--because, when we explain it and they have a chance to think about it, people can see that maybe the public library isn't really the best place to hold their religious service anyway.

And there are other reasons for turning requests down, which I won't get into here for lack of space.  Hate or taking stances on issues doesn't figure into any of them.  We just can't accommodate everything all of the time--sometimes for reasons considered general best practices, sometimes for practical matters involving our building, sometimes--in our case hypothetically, since so far I can't think of a time when it's ever actually been an issue here--because of community considerations.

I served my library apprenticeship in a very diverse university environment.  I've spent over 19 years as a public librarian in a small town that's probably a good deal more diverse in various ways than many would give a town this size credit for.  For two decades it has been my professional and personal commitment to give all the members of the community access to good library service.  I've worked with the local housing authority and other agencies in various ways to try to better serve under-served segments of the community.  I've spent over a decade building up the Dollie Parton's Imagination Library program in our county--we currently have over 600 children under the age of five here receiving books mailed to them free of charge each month because of that ongoing work.

All of which is to say that I have any librarian's commitment to reading and intellectual freedom.  I buy books all the time that I personally would very much rather not have anything to do with--every librarian does; it's part of the job.  Last year I stood up in the presence of our local state representative--a man it would be much in my interest to try to curry favor with--and said to his face in a public meeting that recent controversial library legislation that he supported was wrong.  I wonder how many other people at The Fora have personally done something like that on an intellectual freedom issue, instead of just griping about it at an anonymous forum?

But by all means, write me off as a hater because I won't pronounce a particular shibboleth regarding drag queen story times or the like.  Meanwhile I've got other things to worry about besides what to do about drag queen story times or where to shelve books the Legislature doesn't like.  Stuff like a chronically balky HVAC system.  And multiple vendors who've ghosted us when we've tried to get straight answers out of them.  And wondering how best to deal with declining local tax revenues that have created a structural budget deficit that's draining down our operating reserves and might eventually force me to make some tough choices about cutting staffing levels and services.  Most librarians have things like that to think about too, when they're not trying to justify themselves to people who are just so sure they know how to do their jobs that much better than they do.

apl68, I'm sure you are often caught between a rock and a hard place, balancing opinions on all sides of the political spectrum about the appropriateness of various reading materials, as well as your own beliefs about such matters.

I did a little research and learned that Drag Queen Story Hours started in 2015 because LGBTQ+ parents were bringing their children to events they found very heteronormative, and wanted their children and their friends to be able to recognize all sorts of families and gender expressions.

Then I found this article by Chris Rufo, which tries to create direct links between Drag Queen Story Hour and BDSM, pedophilia, subversion, "necrophilia, bestiality, and race fetishism."

QuoteWhen parents, voters, and political leaders understand the true nature of Drag Queen Story Hour and the ideology that drives it, they will work quickly to restore the limits that have been temporarily—and recklessly—abandoned. They will draw a bright line between adult sexuality and childhood innocence, and send the perversions of "genderfuck," "primitivism," and "degeneracy" back to the margins, where they belong.

But then, this.

Drag Brunch - Baby Shark
#33
Research & Scholarship / Re: March Research Thread
Last post by Parasaurolophus - March 01, 2024, 04:07:16 PM
Quote from: Parasaurolophus on March 01, 2024, 08:18:32 AMToday, I will do a bit more spot-checking for the translation project, start another pile of marking, and try to have a nap.

Did those things, minus the nap, which I'll try to have now. It won't be long, but every bit helps when every day is a 3-5am kind of day.
#34
General Discussion / Re: The Venting Thread
Last post by Aster - March 01, 2024, 04:01:15 PM
Why do so many car drivers in the U.S. now leave 20-40 foot gaps between them and the car ahead of them when they are at traffic stops?

Move the $%^* up.
#35
Teaching / Re: Topic: Bang Your Head on Y...
Last post by Aster - March 01, 2024, 03:57:10 PM
Quote from: mythbuster on February 29, 2024, 10:24:25 AMI have colleagues who have called the doctors office directly to confirm in these kind of cases. It's not a HIPA  violation to ask if they wrote the note.
It turned out that the "doctor's visit" was a tele-health meeting with someone on the other side of North America. And the doctor apparently was too lazy to write a proper note.

So the student called her up again for a second tele-health session, and the doctor re-submitted a proper note.

The tele-health industry does not impress me.
#36
The State of Higher Ed / Re: IHE: Academic Freedom Batt...
Last post by Wahoo Redux - March 01, 2024, 03:22:06 PM
You know, apl, I think all that was covered with my buddy the Mashbarian. 

If there is a good practical reason not to give the community room to some group, so be it.

If no religious group gets to use the community room, I think you can be sued (from my meagre understanding after a Google search) but at least you are not playing favorites or behaving in a hypocritical manner.

And, like the Marshmaster, I have no doubt you are a person of true character. 

But I would add a few things.

Nobody hates everything.  Even people who think they hate everything don't hate everything.  Hate is generally a very targeted thing.

So, a librarian who is a good, warm, wholesome person who does their job professionally, great, but if they deny the community room to a drag queen simply because that person is a drag queen then the librarian has a wee bit of hate in their heart.

I thought about it, and the problem with "serving the community" is that you play into the stereotypes and prejudices of the majority.

The other problem is making the mistake of kowtowing to the violence of bigots.

The other problem is that if a demographic in the community cannot be served because there is a drag queen in the community room it is the demographic's choice not to patronize the library, not the fault of the drag queen.

It is a choice that someone makes not to frequent the library, not that they are denied service.

If Shelly (who used to be Sam before the operation) walks into the periodicals room and sees Bob wearing a bright red MAGA hat and decides "I will not patronize an establishment which serves that kind of degenerate," the fault is on Shelly, not Bob.

Finally, this is not a question of any particular profession.  All this holds true for the manager of a Bob's Big Burger or a Walmart as well as a library, but since the library is generally a public institution paid for with tax dollars, people like me do actually have a say.
#37
Teaching / Re: Topic: Bang Your Head on Y...
Last post by MarathonRunner - March 01, 2024, 03:18:37 PM
We haven't asked for doctors notes since the swine flu, back in 2009? We didn't want sick students, who should be resting and recovering, going to health service and infecting others. Plus, here (Canada) doctors notes aren't covered by provincial health care, so you have to pay out of pocket for them, and many students can't afford it. We trust our students. Now, with COVID, it's even more important to allow COVID positive students to stay home and recover, and not infect others, since COVID can potentially damage almost every body system, including the heart and brain.

The ones who are genuinely ill get time to recover and catch up. Those that lie end up doing poorly, even with extra time or deferred exams. I'd rather trust my students than have to determine if their excuse is valid or their documentation correct.

I benefited from profs who trusted me when I said I had to be in hospital during finals, and profs either let me take the exam early, late, or in one case just gave me the class average (small, fourth year class, ten students in total). So I treat students how I was treated.
#38
General Academic Discussion / Re: NYT Opinion: I Teach the H...
Last post by Wahoo Redux - March 01, 2024, 02:58:13 PM
The ink is black, the page is white
Together we learn to read and write

A child is black, a child is white
The whole world looks upon the sight
A beautiful sight
And now a child can understand
That this is the law of all the land
All the land

The world is black, the world is white
It turns by day and then by night
A child is black, a child is white
Together they grow to see the light
To see the light

And now, at last, we plainly see
We'll have a dance of liberty
Liberty

The world is black, the world is white
It turns by day and then by night
A child is black, a child is white
The whole world looks upon the sight
A beautiful sight

The world is black, the world is white
It turns by day and then by night
A child is black, a child is white
Together they grow to see the light
To see the light

The world is black, the world is white
It turns by day and then by night
A child is black, a child is white
The whole world looks upon the sight
A beautiful sight

The world is black, the world is white
It turns by day and then by night
A child is black, a child is white
Together they grow to see the light
To see the light

C'mon
Get it
Get it
Ohh-ohhhh yeah
Yeah
Keep it up now, around the world
Little boys and little girls
Yeah
Yeah-eah, oh-ohhh
#39
General Academic Discussion / Re: NYT Opinion: I Teach the H...
Last post by Wahoo Redux - March 01, 2024, 02:52:11 PM
Quote from: marshwiggle on March 01, 2024, 12:51:29 PM
Quote from: Wahoo Redux on March 01, 2024, 12:14:42 PMI will give myself full credit for saying to my friend Marsh, "Give out hate, get hate back."

QuoteHe is then stabbed. As he falls, the others slowly
Turn away and whistle

There you go.

So who's the moral champion in this scenario?


Neither, buddy.

I know you see the world in simple dichotomies, but that's not the point of the song. 

If you let hate out, hate proliferates.  And pretty soon the non-haters become neo-haters.

The point of the song is "don't hate!"

Don't hate the drag queen in the library.  Let her do her thing.

Big-D was brilliant to point that out.
#40
The State of Higher Ed / Re: IHE: Academic Freedom Batt...
Last post by apl68 - March 01, 2024, 01:38:55 PM
Dismissing my stance regarding drag queen storytimes as impossible to explain as stemming from anything other than hate is reductive.  Every library and librarian sometimes has to make decisions not to permit a proposed library event or event in a library meeting room.  Libraries have to make guidelines and policies, and then they have to make judgement calls when it turns out the guideline or policy was unable to spell out every possible contingency ahead of time.  And every library has different guidelines and policies and judgements, because libraries and communities aren't all alike, and there's no one-size-fits-all.

In the case of community rooms, I have to tell people every year that we can't let them use our library's community room.  It's generally for reasons that don't have anything to do with hot-button culture war issues.  For example, we have a policy of not letting our community room be used for religious services, broadly defined.  The room's not really there for such services in the first place, and we don't want to give any hint of favoritism toward one or another group, and the simplest way to manage that is to have a single rule that rules them all out.  Our rule might not stand up to a court case, but we've never had a challenge to it--because, when we explain it and they have a chance to think about it, people can see that maybe the public library isn't really the best place to hold their religious service anyway.

And there are other reasons for turning requests down, which I won't get into here for lack of space.  Hate or taking stances on issues doesn't figure into any of them.  We just can't accommodate everything all of the time--sometimes for reasons considered general best practices, sometimes for practical matters involving our building, sometimes--in our case hypothetically, since so far I can't think of a time when it's ever actually been an issue here--because of community considerations.

I served my library apprenticeship in a very diverse university environment.  I've spent over 19 years as a public librarian in a small town that's probably a good deal more diverse in various ways than many would give a town this size credit for.  For two decades it has been my professional and personal commitment to give all the members of the community access to good library service.  I've worked with the local housing authority and other agencies in various ways to try to better serve under-served segments of the community.  I've spent over a decade building up the Dollie Parton's Imagination Library program in our county--we currently have over 600 children under the age of five here receiving books mailed to them free of charge each month because of that ongoing work.

All of which is to say that I have any librarian's commitment to reading and intellectual freedom.  I buy books all the time that I personally would very much rather not have anything to do with--every librarian does; it's part of the job.  Last year I stood up in the presence of our local state representative--a man it would be much in my interest to try to curry favor with--and said to his face in a public meeting that recent controversial library legislation that he supported was wrong.  I wonder how many other people at The Fora have personally done something like that on an intellectual freedom issue, instead of just griping about it at an anonymous forum?

But by all means, write me off as a hater because I won't pronounce a particular shibboleth regarding drag queen story times or the like.  Meanwhile I've got other things to worry about besides what to do about drag queen story times or where to shelve books the Legislature doesn't like.  Stuff like a chronically balky HVAC system.  And multiple vendors who've ghosted us when we've tried to get straight answers out of them.  And wondering how best to deal with declining local tax revenues that have created a structural budget deficit that's draining down our operating reserves and might eventually force me to make some tough choices about cutting staffing levels and services.  Most librarians have things like that to think about too, when they're not trying to justify themselves to people who are just so sure they know how to do their jobs that much better than they do.